Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Veteran Member jimg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2,030

    Default tedders as conditions

    Last night I was talking to my horse owning neighbor and he contends there's no need for a conditioner if a tedder is used. His idea is that the tedder does the work of the conditioner (cracking stems, rubbing up the waxy layer) + fluffing for better air circulation. I must admit Id not thought of a tedder as a flail conditioner but perhaps it is the case although probably not as aggressive. Interesting idea at any rate. What do yo think?

  2. #2
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    108
    Location
    southwestern Virginia

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    I'm no engineer, but from my observations of running both machines, the whirling about of hay from tedding is nothing like the process of sending the hay through rollers for a good mashing. I bet the hay comes through a tedder without any significant trauma to the stems and therefore is not really at all "conditioned" by the process, whereas the mashing action of the rollers definitely does a number on the grasses as they pass through. I'll be quite interested to see what others on the forum think on the subject.

  3. #3
    New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    No tedders and conditioners are not the same thing at all. You can tell when you look at a bale that was cut by disc mower and tedded and cut by a mo/co and baled. The mo/co bale is softer and more palatable to the animal. It also seems to give the hay a better color. I have always used mo/co's whether sickle or disc and wont go to sickle or disc alone then hit with a tedder. More trips around the field like that and a waste of fuel. Only time I ted is if the hay gets rained on

  4. #4
    Platinum Member MFRED's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    924
    Location
    Connecticut
    Tractor
    MF 5435, MF 165

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    In New England everyone has a tedder. If you don't ted the hay you're making silage bales, wether you like it or not. We usually ted 3 times when it's not dead of summer.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member jimg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2,030

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    Im talking about flail conditioners, not roller. In that vein it seems somewhat plausible the action of the tines could act as a type of flail conditioner. Well at least that might be the case for tedders w/ > 2 baskets. While Im not convinced stems would get cracked it does seem as though theyd rub up the leaves and stems to dry down quicker. Just thought Id run it by you all and see what you thought. Just to be clear Im not asking about the wisdom of teddering just what you think about my neighbors idea that conditioning isnt required if you tedder (for the reasons I state above).
    Last edited by jimg; 05-01-2009 at 09:08 AM.

  6. #6
    Super Member Robert_in_NY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    8,423
    Location
    Silver Creek, NY
    Tractor
    Case-IH Farmall 45A, Kubota M8540 Narrow, New Holland TN 65, Bobcat 331, Ford 1920, 1952 John Deere M, Allis Chalmers B, Bombardier Traxter XT, Massey Harris 81RC and a John Deere 3300 combine, Cub Cadet GT1554

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    I do not think you would get anywhere near the results of a conditioner from just a tedder. Actually, the tedder is quite gentle on the plants (of course I am sure you can make it harsher on them). Tedders have dual spring tines that grab the hay gently and flip it where as flail conditioners are much harsher on the plants as they come through the machine.

    Ideally if you have issues with moisture then run both. I have roller conditioners on my discbine and I lay the swath out very wide. Depending on my window I usually ted early the next morning but if it is a narrow window I will ted immediately after cutting just to spread the swath a little wider and fluff the swath again. It helps but I don't think it would warrant doing it on all my acerage.


    God must love stupid people; He made so many

  7. #7
    Elite Member zzvyb6's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    2,562
    Location
    michigan
    Tractor
    jd 1070

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    Well I AM an engineer and I can tell you that a conditioner/crusher is just what it says it is. Its a pre-chewer. The stem cracking deal helps the moisture release and beats down drying time by a day or so (as tested by almost all 1st year ag students). The conditioner does this as the crop is being cut, so the plant damage is far less than beating it uo with a tedder after 2 or 3 days of partial drying. If you spin the tedder too fast (to get the "conditioning" done, there's no leaves left on the stems.
    There is no "I" in team, but there is a "Me" if you want to jumble it up a bit...

  8. #8
    Veteran Member jimg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2,030

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    Well, I agree theres no substitute for a conditioner. Still his idea was sort of interesting.Thanx for the input.

  9. #9
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    Quote Originally Posted by jimg View Post
    Well, I agree theres no substitute for a conditioner. Still his idea was sort of interesting.Thanx for the input.
    It may be interesting, but it is faulty and wrong. The fluffing action of a tedder can not cause the abrasion necessary to condition hay.


    Jim

  10. #10
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    4,144
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Tractor
    Kubota L5030 HSTC, MF 5455

    Default Re: tedders as conditions

    There are some very detailed info out there on the different drying processes, the ag engineers have studied it in detail.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.