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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    127
    Location
    Oklahoma CIty, OK
    Tractor
    John Deere 4300 HST

    Default Tractor Accident

    I heard on the news just now that a farmer was using a hay rake behind his tractor. The rake hit a tree jolting the tractor and throwing the guy off and the tractor ran over him killing him. It sounds like a seat belt might have saved his life.


  2. #2
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    1,591
    Location
    Western Connecticut
    Tractor
    2003 Kubota L3430

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    I wonder if HST would have saved his life, since it brings the tractor to a stop so quickly unless cruise control is on. A cutoff switch connected to the seat may have stopped the tractor in time, also. On the Seat Belt Survey thread there were posts indicating that no kubota's had this feature but that some NH's and some JD's did.

    Glenn


  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    120
    Location
    SW MI
    Tractor
    TC33D 7308 loader 757C backhoe

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    By Mark Fisk Kalamazoo Gazette 10/13/00

    Paw Paw - A Kalamazoo man trying to hoist a tree onto a large brush pile with a tractor was killed Thursday when the tree slipped off the tractor's bucket and fell on him. At 6:45 pm XXXXX, 24, was found sitting on his tractor with his upper body pinned between the steering wheel and the large tree, according to a news release from the Michigan State Police . . .


  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    127
    Location
    Oklahoma CIty, OK
    Tractor
    John Deere 4300 HST

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    Your're right, an HST would have stopped immediately. When I take my foot off the pedal it is almost like applying the brakes my tractor stops so quickly. The seat switch would have killed the tractor immediately. It may have been an older tractor and possibly didn't have these safety features or a seatbelt. Somebody in the office mentioned that seatbelts are a relatively new addition to tractors. Does anybody know when they started putting seatbelts on tractors?


  5. #5

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    569
    Location
    Central Maryland
    Tractor
    Kubota BX 2200

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1928_0051.html
    OSHA Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) Roll-over protective structures (ROPS) for tractors used in agricultural operations. - 1928.51
    "Equipment manufactured on or after September 1, 1972. Material handling machinery described in paragraph (a) of this section and manufactured on or after September 1, 1972, shall be equipped with rollover protective structures which meet the minimum performance standards prescribed in 1926.1001 and 1926.1002, as applicable."



  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    610
    Location
    Ontario
    Tractor
    Ford 1710: Loader, Hoe, Snowblower, Box scrapper & 3ph Forks

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    There are some real tragic accidents reported here: It's sad, because the prevention always seems so simple after the fact. Wear seatbelts, know about ballast and slopes, keep body parts away from anything that moves when the tractor is running, keep out from under anything hydraulic, including when the tractor is off to name a few preventions.

    I'll comment on the loader/log accident, because it took me awhile to realize how a loader lifts. Loaders, and 3ph's, lift in arcs, not in true verticals. When the bucket is high, the bucket is over the tractor, there is nothing between the load and the operator. The bucket also rolls back on lift--even self-leveling buckets don't keep exactly the same level. It would be real easy trying to put a log on a high pile to keep raising the and forget that the bucket may be rolling back as well. Eventually the log can fall off the back of the bucket .

    I think it's very important to realize that loader buckets are for stuff like gravel and not intended for material handling. There are various loader accessories that can turn a loader into something intended for material handling.

    There are grapple forks (clam shells, or what ever they're called will lock a log onto the bucket). I went the route of 3ph pallet forks rather than a fork or other replacement for the loader bucket. However, each would have a backrest so the load can't fall off the back. It's real comforting when you've got a thousand pounds over your head to know that there's a steel frame (and in my case, a ROPS bar as well) between me and the load.

    Anybody who needs to lift and move heavy bulky loads around, PLEASE invent in equipment intended for the job so we don't get any more of these reports. If you have to rely on just a bucket, at least chain the load securely, but remember that a simple loop of chain around the bucket and a load can slide. Actually, with a tall load up high, there really is no safe substitute for forks with a back rest and a carriage tilt.



  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    425
    Location
    New York state
    Tractor
    Kubota B1700 HST

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    Eddie - same thing happened here in Central N.Y. a week or so ago, but this time it was a tractor and loaded hay wagon that rolled and crushed a guy. The common thread in all of these accidents is how dirt simple it would have been to prevent them. A seatbelt put on and buckled, a parking brake applied, a tiltmeter installed and observed...and a life could be saved. I for one hope to NEVER lose the fear (call it respect if you want) that I have for my tractor and implements, and I think as long as I have this constant vigil, I won't die in an easily preventable accident.


  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    532
    Location
    SE Michigan - between Pontiac and Flint
    Tractor
    Kubota B7100 HST - 1995

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    PaulB, wise words for all of us regarding safe and thoughtful operations. I'm a firm believer that operator education, awareness of what they are doing or are about to do, and incredible respect for the power of the equipment we run is the foundation for safe operation. I strongly contend that it only takes a minute more to be safe rather than sorry.

    Bob Pence

  9. #9
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    Most of the features you guys talk about would not work in real farming. The only way to prevent accidents like what was mentioned is to be careful. I do not know how hst works but the way you describe it, it is like a gas pedal which when you are disking or plowing over rough ground you get too much lunging everytime you go over a bump. As far as a seatbelt working, it becomes a real pain if you have to hop on and off the tractor when you go thru pens and gates or when you are changing equipment. Most farmers who have been farming have had close calls by being ignorant and have learned from them and are now conscience enough to put the tractors in neutral and apply the parking brake. The guy who ran his rake into a tree was not paying attention to his implement like he should have been and that cost him his life. The guy lifting a tree onto a brush pile was ignorant enough to try something dumb like that and paid the price also. When ever you try to lift with a front loader you should have a fork lift attachment or at least bucket forks and pay attention to your buckets level. I have had some close calls because I did something stupid but was lucky and have learned from them. I never use a seatbelt because I have to hop on and off of the tractor so much it would get in the way, but when I do hop off the tractor I always put it in neutral and apply the parking brake. All the safty features in the world will not stop ignorant people from doing stupid things.


  10. #10
    Super Star Member Thomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    13,863
    Location
    Lebanon,NH.
    Tractor
    Kubota L2800HST w/Frontloader & CC LTX1046 & Craftman T2200 lawn mower.

    Default Re: Tractor Accident

    turkster,
    I grow up on a farm and had some close calls,and Im sure I still will until I can't turn the key anymore.
    One can be as careful but still accidents shall happen,for equipment shows no feelings towards the operator.

    Are todays tractors more dangerous than yesterday tractors..yes and no.

    There are more tractor being sold today and were hearing about the accidents compare to the 50's&60's,but on the other hand yesterday tractor didn't have the safety devices nor information on safety.

    Its sad to hear or read about accident and may we all learn from that mistake from another.



    Thomas..NH [img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

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