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  1. #31
    Platinum Member bironacad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    659
    Location
    Southern Ontario, Can
    Tractor
    New Holland 3045/2010

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    Belasoarass? That is what I first read the name as lol. Seems to work well for my cousin.
    “If at first you don't succeed, you are running about average.”
    M. H. Alderson

    New Holland 3045 with cab

  2. #32
    Gold Member Hollow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Posts
    496
    Location
    Tuscumbia, Al
    Tractor
    New Holland TT45A

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    They seem to have their good models and bad. I know a man who bought one about 16 years ago that has never had any problems out of it other that a few leaking seals that the model he has is notorious for. I don't know how many hours he has on it now but he pulls a 15' batwing with it a lot.

  3. #33
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    2,870
    Location
    Iuka Mississippi USA
    Tractor
    3550 Fard Backhoe and a 1948 Farmall Cub,

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    Most of the 2wd tractors can be switched to a high crop in a few hours. I have a friend with a 250 that didnt know that. THe rear final drive housings have check plugs on the top and side. Unbolted they can rotate down. Then the front spindles have holes to let them adjust down.

  4. #34
    Advertiser Mark @ Everlast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,091
    Location
    South GA

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    The 250 and the 400 series were the only two that could do it. The AN version was actually a lower profile version of the 400, which the way it was set up sort of permanently in a low profile position, due to the tire configuration. The 4wd version was permanently fixed, and in the AN version, it had a "reclining" look to it. The regular 400 had only two positions, while the 250 had 3. The 310 version of the 250 had to be built in high profile position, since the front driving axles were so massive and the tires were so tall, to get the correct drive ratio.
    Mark Lugo
    Everlast Welders
    http://www.everlastgenerators.com/

    Need a welder? Give me a call at (877) 755-9353 ext 204!

  5. #35
    Advertiser Mark @ Everlast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,091
    Location
    South GA

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    Quote Originally Posted by foreman Etexas View Post
    I had a 804 and just sold it but it was a tank. Shifter hard to find a gear(gotta turn knob this way or that way,never knew what gear was in),hyd.leaked down,brakes were always a problem but it sure would pull and the 3point power down would bend a bit before it stopped,there frontends on the 2wheel drive models are the weakest thing about them,mine was worn out with only 600hrs on tractor,tires turned all over the place but hey was my first tractor,better than nothing

    Gotta look past the orange,shes setting back thereAttachment 252540
    The front ends that I have had experience with never gave much issue, other than a sagging spring in the king pin housing sometimes. IF you didn't re-tighten the nuts on the ball joints, they would get loose. They were sort of soft, so sometimes they needed to be replaced. Also, an important note, the ball joints are adjustable, and you can take up play and slack by turning the adjustment down to tighten them. Never had a center pivot pin issue that I can remember. The Dan Foss power steering system was an excellent design, and rarely had issues with the MTZ tractors, though it could feel a little "indirect" in steering at times.

    The tractors were no better than the local dealer, and the service given. The incredible thing is I know where some of the earliest models ever brought in the country in the late 60's and early 70's are still plugging along. One of the issues, is that I saw, was because the tractors were cheap as dirt, they got treated like dirt. People used and abused them, and never changed the oil or followed the service schedule. How many of them ever saw a transmission oil change? Never it seems. Yet people complained. Yes, the electricals were not so great, but if sheltered, they'd be much better. As shown in the picture, they were generally left out in the elements, where rats, birds, and other critters would use them for nests. The Hydraulic leak issue was largely a result of a couple of issues. 1) The units used straight 30 weight motor oil. Most guys would toss in a can of extreme pressure, and expect it not to leak. 2). The banjo fittings required a good tightening after a couple hundred hours ( or just a couple of hours in some cases). Once correctly tightened and if necessary, the copper washers were replaced, leaks were usually kept at bay, unless the Hydraulic cylinder blew an oring. They key to the Belarus system though was that it was 100% external. If you saw the kind of leakage you can get in an internal system, you'd realize exactly why they were made to be out of sight!

    The gear in the transmission, with the selector knob was loved by some, hated by others. The old style center located shifter never gave much issues. The side shift, confused a lot of people particularly with the spitter in the floor. When selecting high and low range, a lot of people could not remember that these gears were self polishing, and the tractor needed to be rolling slightly when ranges were changed, or getting the tractor into any gear could be difficult.
    Mark Lugo
    Everlast Welders
    http://www.everlastgenerators.com/

    Need a welder? Give me a call at (877) 755-9353 ext 204!

  6. #36
    New Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    2
    Location
    karachi-pakistan
    Tractor
    balrus

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    I have balarus in my use for quite sometimes. I am satisfied by its performance. If some one can me how to use it as a back-hoe or excavator. I also want to know what type of gadgets other than usual can be atached to it for farm use.

  7. #37
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    206
    Location
    SC
    Tractor
    long 2460 - belarus 250 - JD 4230 - Kioti DK40SE

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    I have had a 250 for a few years that I paid 1200 for just to leave an implement attached to and in case my long went down for whatever reason. Its definitely not fun to drive and the non power steering sucks, but it starts everytime and does what I need. It all depends on what you pay for it. I have gotten my moneys worth out of mine for sure. I like the cab also in case I want to go mess around in the rain or whatever. The 3pt downpressure is a great feature and the lift cylinder can be rebuilt for $20 in about an hour. When it does need work, it's very easy to work on. no complaints here

  8. #38
    Advertiser Mark @ Everlast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    2,091
    Location
    South GA

    Default Re: Belarus tractors

    Have you tried to shorten the steering arm? A factory approved modification way back when was to remove a 2 inch section out of the steering arm, just above the joint, and reweld it. This would greatly reduce the steering effort, but increase the turns on the wheel to about 1.75 turns from center to lock instead of the normal 1. Some of the newer steering boxes weren't so great and the lower or upper bearing would go bad. It is replaceable, but a difficult job for a novice. A new steering box isn't bad. But if you remove the piece out of the steering arm that comes from the steering box, don't remove too much or your worm gear may run out of travel before it's completely turned.
    Mark Lugo
    Everlast Welders
    http://www.everlastgenerators.com/

    Need a welder? Give me a call at (877) 755-9353 ext 204!

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