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  1. #11
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    11,197
    Location
    PA
    Tractor
    NH TC25D

    Default Re: Tiller

    ddl, your post would have conveyed the same information had you left out the <font color=blue>pejoratives</font color=blue>. They were hardly in the spirit of TBN.

    <font color=blue>this is the worst advise to give someone learning about tractors.</font color=blue> You need to buy the size of tiller that your tractor can control. The idea of buying the tiller the same width as your tractor tires is <font color=blue>not only wrong but</font color=blue> very unsafe. Unsafe in that the tiller will push the tractor all over the place, hard on 3p system. A one dealer told me only people interested in repairs will over size their equipment for the tractor they have. Manufacturers give the size guide to keep people from damaging the tractor. Use a little common sense and follow people who have to stand behiond their words( the people who privide the warrenty). <font color=blue>Everytime I read the statment of buy a tiller to cover your tracks I laugh because I know I am reading a response from someone with little experience. Sorry if this is hard sounding but some people are asking for input, at least give them smart input.</font color=blue>

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    349
    Location
    Peculiar, MO
    Tractor
    B2400 Kubota

    Default Re: Tiller

    several things you are missing, the biggest part is that the soil type that you have is propably different from a different area. As an example I have a 42 inch tiller behind a B2400. I was tilling up sod around my home and I had a wild ride. The tires of the tractor was even going in revrse trying to hold the tiller pushing the tractor. But the biggest problem is the stress you are putting on the tractors three point system by over weight. You hear some people say, the over pressure value will open and stop any damage. What they do not understand is this value will only work a few times and it will stop working correctly, just like a circuit breaker will only trip a few times. One thing I never thought of was the force put on the 3p when traveling or driving with the tiller up. You say you used the tiller for four years, how many acreas did you till in that period that was not yours?

    We get alot of good ideas from this site but sometimes the advisors need to remember that who they are talking to is not their next door neighbor and they will not pay for the results of that person taking the advise offerred.

    If you want to use a tiller or any other piece of equipment make sure your tractor can handle the piece of equipment. You ask what size the person should buy, the largest til;ler their tractor can handle, which may not be as wide as the tractor. What size does the tractor manual suggest for a tiller. Why do you think they may suggest a certain size, trying to limit the amount of money a tractor operator may spend for a tiller, I think not. After using my undersized tiller in many different soils, I think I will keep my 42 inch tiller, the finished job is well worth the time spent.

    Dan L

  3. #13
    Banned RonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    430
    Location
    Worcester, Massachusetts
    Tractor
    Caterpillar 416C IT, Caterpillar D3G, previously owned a Ford 1910

    Default Re: Tiller

    Dan

    Circuit breakers will only trip a few times? Wow!

    RonL

  4. #14
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    1,317
    Location
    Alberta
    Tractor
    Kubota B2410 with turfs

    Default Re: Tiller

    Dan,

    <font color=blue>But the biggest problem is the stress you are putting on the tractors three point system by over weight. </font color=blue>

    I have the same (almost) tractor as you do, a B2410. I have a 56" tiller that I use. It has tilled up a lot of very hard virgin clay with the sod on top. I could certainly feel the tiller moving around behind me, but I was in NO WAY being pushed forward by the tiller! I was definitely having to feather the accelerator to continue forward motion. The tiller weighs 379lbs so I'm really not sure how that can be considered to be putting stress on the 3ph when the B2410 is rated for much more than that!!

    Kevin

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    477
    Location
    Fort Kent, Maine
    Tractor
    B6100D Kubota

    Default Re: Tiller

    Just for the record, circuit breakers, like pressure relief valves will trip way more than a few times. The biggest problem from circuit breakers comes from inactivity, not over activity. It's recommended, in some areas, to manually toggle the breakers of, then on every six months, to make sure they are able to disconnect the circuit.

    Place I used to work at in Ct, OSHA came in and found that the breakers wouldn't trip at five times the rating. Told us to cycle them twice a year to keep them from sticking. Same for T/P (temperature/pressure) relief valves.

    Just my $.02

  6. #16
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    175
    Location
    rural illinois
    Tractor
    jd 4100

    Default Re: Tiller

    the electricians in st. louis tell people to cycle the breakers when we change the clocks [that stupid ritual of screwing with the time is insane, anyway -]

    you should also test your smoke/CO detectors at the same time of year.

    the method of exercising your circuit breakers:
    turn off each small breaker
    turn off the MAIN breaker

    cycle the main breaker a few times

    turn the MAIN OFF

    cycle each smaller breaker a few times and leave in the OFF position.

    turn ON the MAIN with ALL of the smaller breakers OFF.

    turn ON each smaller breaker one at a time.

    there is a significant hazard in throwing the MAIN ON with all of the smaller breakers in the ON position.
    [so don't do that!]

  7. #17
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    175
    Location
    rural illinois
    Tractor
    jd 4100

    Default Re: Tiller

    good words mike!
    thanks for the wisdom &amp; thanks to BIRD too.

    bird and i do not always see eye to eye, but bird has always shown respect to me and others for our differing opinions.

    i thank all of you for your tolerance of my position and opinions

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,806
    Location
    Houston, TX.
    Tractor
    2001 TN65, 1951 8N Ford

    Default Re: Tiller

    I probably shouldn't jump in with this in the middle of what looks to be developing into a low grade pissing contest, but, it's been my experience that breakers that have been tripped a few times due to overload seem to get progressively weaker. My personal theory, and I'm sure that someone will gleefully correct me if I'm wrong [img]/w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif[/img], is that when the contacts get arced because of the repeated overload it causes a voltage drop, causing the metal strip in the breaker to remain heated. That, plus the higher amperage created due to the lower voltage ( have I mis -interpeted Ohm's Law again?), will cause the breaker to trip at a lower than rated amperage. Of course, we all fix the overload before it comes
    to that, don't we? [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  9. #19
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    175
    Location
    rural illinois
    Tractor
    jd 4100

    Default Re: Tiller

    no issues here!

    thanks for the input!

  10. #20
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    1,927
    Location
    Home-1+ acres New Hope, TX / 24 acres-Fannin County
    Tractor
    JD 950

    Default Re: Tiller

    Not to get nit picky, but, yes you did misinterpret ohm's law again. Lower voltage results in lower current, not higher. You are probably right on, however, with the increase temp. An increase in resistance would cause a higher voltage drop and an increase in temperature.

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