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  1. #41
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    17,521
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Tiller

    Bird:
    That's the way I plant onion sets. Works a lot easier than going along on hands and knees. Have you ever tried planting onions in late Sept. or early Oct. and leave them out over winter for a real good spring start? This works well for spinach too.

    Egon

  2. #42
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,281
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Tiller

    Egon, I haven't left any onions out over winter, but my dad used to do that; not a bad idea.

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,807
    Location
    Sharpsburg, Md
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 HST

    Default Re: Tiller

    Bird/Egon,

    You guys plant your onions the same way we do. Works like a charm. If you are planting leeks, just dig the furrow a little deeper to get than good white stalk.

    Terry

  4. #44
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    1,301
    Location
    Alberta
    Tractor
    Kubota B2410 with turfs

    Default Re: Tiller

    Chuck,

    <font color=blue>The KK yellow clashes rather badly with kubota orange</font color=blue>

    Don't worry about that!! If your garden is really too wet then your tiller will soon be dirt brown! That ought to match fine! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

    Kevin

  5. #45
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    2,387
    Location
    Mid-Missouri
    Tractor
    Kubota L210

    Default Re: Tiller

    Kevin,
    I could swear I repied to this....must be old timer's disease again. Anyway, I think I said or meant to say that my tiller already had some nice rust brown to it. It had set out over the winter at the store. I didn't argue about the spots because as you say it should be dirt brown soon anyway. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Bird and onion folks:
    Are those the Texas sweets you plant? I think I'll do some of what I call slips this year too, mainly for use as green onions. The sets, or bare bulbs, make OK bulb-type green onions, but you have to let them grow a bit bigger than the scallion-type green onions. For this area, I can probably put out the sets now, but the slips should probably wait a month or so. I'd like to try some leeks too. The wife has a killer leek soup recipe, and leeks are expensive.

    I guess this has wandered off from the Attachment topic a bit. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/tongue.gif[/img]

    Chuck



  6. #46
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
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    37,281
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Tiller

    Chuck, I've tried a few other varieties, but now I only use the Texas 1015Y onions; makes good sweet onions, good size, and keep well. And I don't know for sure, but I've been told they named them 1015Y because the nursery has to plant the seed by October 15 and they're yellow, although only yellow on the very exterior layer of course; white the rest of the way through.

  7. #47
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Tiller

    Bird - Pleez tri tu hole the lingth uv yor posts down. [weenk]

  8. #48
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,281
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Tiller

    Thought I wuz, Mark - tryin' that is.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

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