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  1. #1
    Bronze Member Cade's Avatar
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    Northeast PA
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    Kubota L2650GST

    Default WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    I am considering the purchase of a log splitter to split wood to heat my house and garage. Which do you have make/model etc and what are the pros/cons between an electric/gas and 3pt hitch?


    THANKS for any responses.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member gordon21's Avatar
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    Feb 2006
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    Lake Lure NC
    Tractor
    JD 790

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    3PT:
    pros: cheaper, harder to steal, no one wants to borrow it, you can set work height at waist level to save your back, easily taken to the wood site via tractor, cheap to run (tractor diesel), quieter than most self contained ones, one less engine and hydraulic system to maintain, more compact to store

    Tow behind:
    pros: you can loan it to friends, easy to move from lot to lot


    Neither one will have an advantage over speed, capacity, etc. That is a function of the model you buy (HP and pump capacity).

    Most will also tilt up vertical or work horizontal. The 3PT can be raised in the horizontal position. To me, that is probably the single best reason to buy one. You do not get an aching back when you are standing up to split.


    If you later decide to get a 3PT splitter, then there will be another set of pros and cons about which type of 3PT.
    Lewis Gordon

    JD 790, 300 FEL, 5' KK rotary mower, 5' boxscraper, Huskee 3PT logsplitter, JD#39N sickle mower and a Jinma 6" chipper in JD colors.

    My XUV gas Gator wants a brother !!!!!!!! (the diesel kind)

  3. #3
    Bronze Member Cade's Avatar
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    Northeast PA
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    Kubota L2650GST

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    Thanks for the input. I like the idea of less back aches with the 3pt hitch. Excellent point!

  4. #4
    Super Member greg_g's Avatar
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    Western Kentucky
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    JD3720 Cab, 300X loader with 4-in-1 bucket

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    Quote Originally Posted by Cade
    Which do you have make/model etc and what are the pros/cons between an electric/gas and 3pt hitch?
    If money is a factor, it makes a difference whether your tractor already has at least one set of hydraulic remotes. The lower end TPH splitters rely on the tractor's hydraulic pump and remote valve to work. Higher end TPH splitters have their own pump, which is driven by the tractor PTO. But they'll likely cost more than the tow behing gasoline powered type.

    So - if your tractor already has the right plumbing - I'd say TPH is the splitter of choice. Spend the extra few bucks to get one that works both horizontally and vertically (I got mine for under $600, less hoses and fittings). If you don't have the right tractor plumbing, it would likely be cheaper to get the tow-behind gasoline powered variety

    //greg//
    USN (Ret)
    Former Chinese tractor owner (x4)
    Current John Deere owner

  5. #5
    Bronze Member Cade's Avatar
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    Northeast PA
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    Kubota L2650GST

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    No plumbing on mine. I guess I will lokk into the tow behind. Anyone out there have or used the DR electric splitter. There was a commercial on tv the other night on this.

  6. #6
    Elite Member Gittyup's Avatar
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    Oct 2007
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    Mid Atlantic
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    Kioti CK25 Shuttle Shift, loaded tires, JD X739

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    Others have talked about an advantage of the tow behind: You can work your tractor to bring wood to the splitter, take split loads out (say on pallets), and use the tractor as a saw buck. Search for threads on 3ph log splitters. There has been much discussion already.

    Both have advantages. I'm still undecided as to which is "better". One problem with this new lousy ethanol gasoline is that you have to continually start all your machines or risk having a gummed up carb if you let it sit too long. For me it's a chore now, with tiller, lawnmower, ATVs, garden tractor, CUT, lawn vacuum, chainsaws, blower, weedeaters, hedgetrimmers, etc. etc. to have to maintain and keep in good running order.

  7. #7
    Elite Member Gittyup's Avatar
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    Mid Atlantic
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    Kioti CK25 Shuttle Shift, loaded tires, JD X739

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    Quote Originally Posted by Cade
    No plumbing on mine. I guess I will lokk into the tow behind. Anyone out there have or used the DR electric splitter. There was a commercial on tv the other night on this.
    I'd still lean toward adding the rear remotes. Cost wise, it might be a wash between new remotes/pto splitter vs. a standalone. The rear remotes are so very useful for many attachments anyway. I like them so much that I added a set to my garden tractor too.

    The electric splitters are light duty from what I've seen.

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
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    North of the Fingerlakes - NY
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    Ford 4000; Ford 2000(both 3cyl.);JD40; 2004 Kubota L4300; 2006 Kubota B7610; new 2007 Kubota MX5000

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    I've got one of the TSC 35 ton Briggs Stratton (12.5HP) powered tow-behinds. For the most part, I like it. I often split big and gnarly stuff and this splitter has never lacked for power....if the grain is crooked and the wood doesn't want to split, it'll get sliced. Maybe they're all that way; only other splitter I've used is a home-made one that was lacking in some respects.

    What I don't like is the starting problems brought on by bad gas and/or low temperatures. Like Gittyup said, it needs to be run frequently to start easily. Then there's the kick-back on the starter rope when it's feeling balky. That can hurt; but it usually just makes me mad and a battle of wills ensues. Once it's run a little, you can shut it down and it'll start easily the rest of the day.

    I've got remotes on the B7610 but the tractor's hydraulic flow rate is only about half what the pump on the TSC splitter can deliver. I figured this would mean that any tractor hydraulic powered splitter would either be much weaker or much slower than the TSC splitter, so didn't pursue it. Didn't think of using a PTO powered pump. That would deliver plenty of flow. Might go that way when the Briggs dies.

    Still, I sometimes tow the splitter behind the pickup truck to an elderly neighbor's place and help him split his wood. Nice not having to take the tractor along to power it. At home, the tractor's FEL is often needed to deliver big pieces to the splitter. Also, the hookup to the ball hitch is easier than a 3PH hookup and the thing can be moved easily without the tractor when it's in the way. So the standalone splitter does have some significant plusses.
    FWIW
    Bob
    New Kidz: '04 L4300 w/BH-90X, '06 B7610, '07 MX5000 Old Pros: '75 Ford 4000, '54 JD40

    Romans 8:28

  9. #9
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
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    South Puget Sound, WA
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    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    The typical prince pto hydraulic pump is over 400$ to buy plus shipping. Super cool though. The smallest of the the typical stand alone hydraulic log splitters use an 11 GPM pump and a 4" ram for 18-20 tons of pressure at 3000 psi. Your tractor will probably have less psi and lower flow rate for a slower ram and lower overall force.

    Go standalone.
    Kioti CK30HST, FEL w/toothbar, 60" RC, 60" BB, PJ 10k trailer. Weekend warrior hauling 50 miles each way.

  10. #10

    Default Re: WHICH LOG SPLITTER

    I looked and looked, used and new. I decided a tow behind-style made more sense for me.

    I finally bought the tow-behind TSC (SpeeCo) 22-ton model with 6.5hp B&S new for a really good price due to a 10% TSC coupon they mailed me plus an in-store discount. It ended up being less than many used splitters I'd seen advertised.

    Overall, I have to say I'm very impressed. Up to that point, I had mostly been splitting all my wood by hand, but the ugly pile was getting big. It split the gnarliest pieces I had.

    I've been burning about 5 cords/year. I had rented a splitter once a couple yrs back, but at $60/day plus the trip/reservation hassle, it wouldn't take too many rentals to justify the purchase and convenience.

    Look for a deal, (ask about floor models, etc. and look for coupons) and you can find a new one for less than a used one.

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