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  1. #11
    Veteran Member wedge40's Avatar
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    Oct 2007
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    2,149

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    I've seen some "screens" on here that would let you scoop a layer of dirt and rock off the top, run it through the screener and the dirt falls through and the rock stay on the top. If the rock is small this would be a smaller screen and more work get the dirt and stone separated.

    Wedge
    1967 Ford 4000, Box blade, straight blade, FEL, Rake, Bushhog, Backhoe, Jinma chipper, KKII tiller, Grapple.

  2. #12
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    3,974
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    Raleigh, NC Hillsville, VA
    Tractor
    L2800.

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    What are your plans for the rock after you it pick up? If you don't have a need for it and want to get rid of it... dig a big hole next to it, push the rock in and it cover up...

  3. #13
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    416
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    Kubota GL3830/GL5030

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    So...after failing with several tries using a power rake, tiller, York rake, other misc tools and even kids to pick up these loads of rock, I now see that there are tow behind rock picker tools (see attached).

    I am now trying to decide between a used tow behind picker and a rock bucket (see attached).

    The idea is to use the tool both for reclaiming this 1100' path (and re-using the rock on a new section of driveway), but then also use it annually to reclaim the rocks that inevitably get pushed to the sides of my 800' driveway (especially due to plowing activities).

    I like the bucket idea since there are no moving parts to maintain, but am concerned about the amount of time that I'll need to spend with it to get the 1100' job done along with the reclaim work each year. I also like the idea of the portability of the bucket and the fact that you can "shake" the bucket using loader hydraulics to minimize dirt pickup. The big concern continues to be the amount of time it will take to use the bucket.

    Any ideas?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -rock-bucket-jpg   -rock-picker-jpg  

  4. #14
    Super Star Member IslandTractor's Avatar
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    Sep 2005
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    15,422
    Location
    Prudence Island, RI
    Tractor
    2007 Kioti DK40se HST, Woods BH

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    I have not used either rock collecting device but based on my experience with other implements I'd go for the 3PT mounted drag rather than the FEL mounted sieve to do a project such as a 1100 foot driveway. That sort of work would be very hard on an FEL. I'd guess that the 3pt rock collector would be much more expensive though.

  5. #15
    Platinum Member BarryinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    860
    Location
    Minnesota
    Tractor
    JD, Allis-Chalmers, Zetor

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    I have settled on a skidloader run by my brothers kid.

    The bucket is a modified manure fork - welded on 12"-15" tip extensions. She spent the weekend in it and went home tired, muddy and grinning from ear to ear.

    Also have a rock bucket similar to your picture but with a grapple. Tines are too close together heavy clay/sod will not drop thru. 6" spacing works better but is easier to bend. Other problem is tractor hood blocks sight lines for smaller rocks >500lbs.

    I have a tow beside melroe type picker for sale if your interested.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -dscn0432-704-x-528-jpg  
    Veneer Tree Farmer

  6. #16
    Gold Member
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    Dec 2005
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    416
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    Kubota GL3830/GL5030

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    The rocks that I am looking to pick in the 1100' temporary drive are only 3". There isn't any vegetation there, only the rock. Six inch tine spacing won't do me much good there.

    Sadly, the rocks that I would be clearing annually are mostly going to be only 3/4". I expect that the drive edges will eventually be lawn, so am half hoping that an angled York rake will pull the rock up out of the grass without dropping earth onto the drive.

    FEL wear is an interesting concern - can't say I thought of that one. I wouldn't expect to be doing this work at any appreciable speed (likely 1mph or less, really, especially for the 1100' run). I imagine that would help on the wear.

  7. #17
    Elite Member CurlyDave's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    4,098
    Location
    Grants Pass, OR
    Tractor
    JD TLB 110

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    I am now trying to decide between a used tow behind picker and a rock bucket (see attached).

    I tried using a rock bucket to essentially "mine" the rock out of about a 40 yard pile of dirt with many many rocks in it, maybe 10" and below.

    While I got about 3 yards of rock out of it, I decided it was not worth the effort and will willingly pay the $15-20 per yard for trucked in rock.

    The main problem is that if the dirt is dry enough for the rock to separate easily it forms a huge cloud of dust with you and the tractor right in the middle.

    A second problem is that shaking the bucket to separate the rock from the dirt looks to me to be very hard on the machine.

    In your situation, I would far rather scoop up the rock dirt mixture and use it for very deep road base somewhere else, adding more base rock and then gravel on top of it. Then import topsoil. Not the least expensive, but I decided my lungs were not going to take sitting in that dust cloud for weeks on end.
    40 Acres on a hill - fantastic view. JD 110 TLB, 4-n-1, 12" bucket, 18" bucket, Addington thumb, rock bucket (doubles as root grapple)

    Not only do we not understand the universe, if someone explained it to us, we would not know what he was talking about.

    Isaac Asimov

  8. #18

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    Quote Originally Posted by 5030tinkerer View Post
    The rocks that I am looking to pick in the 1100' temporary drive are only 3". There isn't any vegetation there, only the rock. Six inch tine spacing won't do me much good there.

    Sadly, the rocks that I would be clearing annually are mostly going to be only 3/4". I expect that the drive edges will eventually be lawn, so am half hoping that an angled York rake will pull the rock up out of the grass without dropping earth onto the drive.

    FEL wear is an interesting concern - can't say I thought of that one. I wouldn't expect to be doing this work at any appreciable speed (likely 1mph or less, really, especially for the 1100' run). I imagine that would help on the wear.

    In general 3/4 rock that goes off the road is just gone. You can pull a portion of it back onto the road with a rake or blade. In general, I have not noticed that the rake was better than the blade for this job. Either way, you are going to pull a lot of dirt and organics onto the road. The organics will dry and blow off the road, the dirt will be incorporated into the road. Most of the rock that leaves the road becomes incorporated into the surrounding sod.

  9. #19
    Epic Contributor jinman's Avatar
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    Feb 2001
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    21,014
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    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: Tool for picking up rock

    Quote Originally Posted by 5030tinkerer View Post
    . . . I now see that there are tow behind rock picker tools (see attached).

    I am now trying to decide between a used tow behind picker and a rock bucket (see attached).
    For your application, I think the rock picker might work better. It will shine on large flat and consistent areas with baseball to football size rocks.

    The rock bucket is something you can use on hillsides and gulleys. It allows you to dig and pry out large rocks as well as small ones. I consider it a more flexible tool for that type of work. The picker would be no use at all on these jobs.
    Jim


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