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  1. #1
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    Default dearborn plow

    I have a two moldboard 16" dearborn plow I think its either a model 101 or
    10?1(the model # is sort of scratched out) with coulters. Anyway i've never used this plow and was wondering if it was any good.

  2. #2
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Where do I begin.....

    Default Re: dearborn plow

    101 is a FORD plow, manufactured by Oliver or Pittsburg Plow for Ford. Dearborn plows are of an earlier era. They're decent plows but not nearly as good as a 101. The 101 has much greater clearance and a stronger, stiffer frame. If it's a Dearborn, the numbers will be 10-XX depending on model/size.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: dearborn plow

    Okay it definitely 10X1 then because I'm sure its a dearborn. There is a little metal plate that has all the information on it except the third digit of the model number is unreadable.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: dearborn plow

    I have a Dearborn model 10-1, that I modified a little bit to use 101 Ford wear parts. My plow was worn out and original points were way to expensive to buy-for me at least. My Dearborn pulls much easier than the newer cheaper generic type plow that I used before I rebuilt this one. My plow is 2x14 inch bottoms. I don't know what makes it pull easier, but it does.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: dearborn plow

    Yeah it looks like the model number could be 10-1. how do you set yours up to plow because I have no idea?

  6. #6
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    Default Re: dearborn plow

    Try the thread titled 2 bottom plow. It has lots of good info. Get back here with questions if you need more help.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: dearborn plow

    Backdoor, that link doesn't work but that's okay because instead i searched "2 bottom plow" and found that thread and a bunch of other great ones. They helped a lot but as always it gave me more questions. First, how do I measure my plow to find whether its a 14" or 16"? I thought I was measuring right but now I'm not sure. How does the size of the moldboard affect the HP requirements of the plow? Also when did they stop designing tractors for moldboard plowing because I was talking to my great uncle and he said he Moldboard plow for all his farming days and he retired in the 1990s.

  8. #8
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    1987 Ford 2810

    Default Re: dearborn plow

    You can measure the width of your plow from the left side of the left beam to the left side of the right beam on top of the plow. Be sure to measure at a 90 degree angle to the beams-shortest distance between the left sides (or right sides, or center to center) is what bottom you have. A single 14 inch plow will cut 2 inches less dirt width in the furrow than a 16 inch bottom. A 2x14 will cut 4 inches less than a 2x16 plow. In other words, you have to cut and throw 4 inches more dirt with a 2x16 than a 2x14, and in hard or fairly dry dirt that makes a big difference, especially if you are about maxed out with your tractor size. I have heard a "general" rule of thumb of 1 HP per inch of plow bottom-2x14 will need about 28 HP. I guess sometime in the '70's when no till farming was being pushed by the thinkers of farming, everyone was going to chisel plows, V plow subsoilers, or they were planting no till for several years before loosening the land by one of the above methods.They sprayed the weeds down. At least they did it that way around here. Now they use super heavy disks to work their fields. I have a Ford 2810, 33 HP, bought new in '87, that I use for plowing about 6 acres a year, and the only problem I have with adjusting my plow just right is that I have a ROPS with a canopy, and I would have to remove the ROPS to get my tires close enough together to get my plow to hit the open furrow exactly right, and I really like the canopy. I'm only wide by about 2 inches, so I don't bother with it at all. You have to live with what you have. Hope this helps.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: dearborn plow

    I should be good then I have a Ford 2600 (40 hp). I just hope I'm able to adjust the tread of my tires because that sounds better than having to adjust everything else. Fortunately my uncle who is an experienced farmer will be there to help me.

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