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  1. #11
    New Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    5
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Tractor
    Kubota 2920

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    Sounds like a disk may be my best option. Will I also need some type of drag harrow behind the disk if I am only disking "lightly"?

    Some disk appear to have notched blades on both the front and back and others have notched blades only on the front set. What difference does this make?

    I originally was shying away from buying a disk since I already have a tiller.

    Steve

  2. #12
    Super Member N80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    5,264
    Location
    SC
    Tractor
    Kubota L4400 4wd w/LA 703 FEL

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    Quote Originally Posted by sedmond View Post
    Sounds like a disk may be my best option. Will I also need some type of drag harrow behind the disk if I am only disking "lightly"?
    Probably not. But, if you disk heavily, then seed, you might need a drag harrow to lightly cover the seed. I've gotten good results (cow peas, sorghum, sunflowers, oats, etc) by disking heavily (usually after plowing), then broadcasting then disking with the disk gangs straight and not using a drag harrow at all. YMMV.

    Some disk appear to have notched blades on both the front and back and others have notched blades only on the front set. What difference does this make?
    I've ben told that notched disks are better for chopping clods and turf etc. All the disks on mine were notched and they seem to work well. I've seen disks where they are all un-notched. Others mixed. For most of us it probably makes no difference.

    I originally was shying away from buying a disk since I already have a tiller.

    Steve
    They do similar things. A tiller almost certainly 'tills' better and is great for smaller areas. A disk can cover a lot more ground a lot faster and in general you can probably find more tasks to do with a disk.

    I think a disk will serve you well, but definitely consider all the responses you've gotten here.
    George
    South Carolina

    The size of government is inversely proprotional to the degree of freedom it affords.

    "What is truth?" Pontius Pilate

  3. #13
    Veteran Member kthompson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,057
    Location
    South Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota M 6800; Kubota B 2710; Gator; Bushhog ZTR; Volvo Mini Excavator EC45

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    sedmond, agree with N80 very much.

    The notch blades are for crop trash. Crop trash will get caught in the notches and get cut where often will just keep being pushed by the round blade. That is why you see them on the front and round on the if you see both on a disk. The more trash you have the more valuable they are. As to clods, no idea there. If the dirt were right clean think you get more complete cut with the round blades as you get the full depth all the way around the blade.

  4. #14
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    115
    Location
    Smarr Georgia
    Tractor
    L5030 cab, JD 2940

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    When I worked on the dairy we would overseed our pastures every fall, about 300 acres worth. We would adjust our harrows so that the disks were straighter, then we would broadcast the seed and lightly disk over it pulling a drag behind the disk. We too have classic red clay but in the fall we would have to keep the wheels on the ground to keep the disk from going in to deeply. Of course we were using a pull disk which has more weight on the disks but I have done this also with my 3pt disk with good results.

  5. #15
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    23
    Location
    central Illinois
    Tractor
    CaseIH DX34 FEL,Farmall 31

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    Here is a little unit I have on order and looking to do very similar things you are looking at doing.

    Aerator Products

    I'm thinking I will either disk or use my scarifier to lightly scratch open the dirt.

  6. #16
    New Member
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    Mar 2008
    Posts
    23
    Location
    central Illinois
    Tractor
    CaseIH DX34 FEL,Farmall 31

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    oops.. its the Ferguson 3pt yardmaker.. just realize the link had several pieces of equipment on it. darn mouse clicking.. it does what I tell it to do and not always what I want it to do..

  7. #17
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    248
    Location
    Indiana
    Tractor
    TC40DA

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    you're not gonna grow sqat after discing and waste your money on seed. good luck.
    your question is like this one, i have a hammer are screwdriver and a pocket knife, which one is the best to mine salt with?
    use the right tool for the right job.

  8. #18
    Super Member N80's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
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    5,264
    Location
    SC
    Tractor
    Kubota L4400 4wd w/LA 703 FEL

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    you're not gonna grow sqat after discing and waste your money on seed. good luck.
    You might be right, but no more likely to be right than anyone else who has answered so far. I have done what he is talking about, using a disk. Not only did I get a good yield (although it was not clover) it also did not significantly damage the existing grass. When a disk is set with the gangs out straight, it does little more than put a long grove in the ground. It does not go deep and does not move much dirt. It does not 'turn' any sod.

    Quote Originally Posted by Skerby View Post
    your question is like this one, i have a hammer are screwdriver and a pocket knife, which one is the best to mine salt with?
    That's correct. So why would someone then answer that he needs a $100,000 saltminer? He has what he has, or what he can resaonably aquire. Which of those is best?

    use the right tool for the right job.
    A no-till drill would be the right tool for the job. If he can rent one and if his tractor can pull it and if it can handle his soil, then that would be a good option. But those are 'ifs' that he has to answer, not you or me. And, when he's done renting it, he has nothing to show for it but the crop. If he gets a disk or a cultivator then he will get years of additional use from them.
    George
    South Carolina

    The size of government is inversely proprotional to the degree of freedom it affords.

    "What is truth?" Pontius Pilate

  9. #19
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Aug 2005
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    7,514
    Location
    Mt Washington, Kentucky
    Tractor
    Where do I begin.....

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    Quote Originally Posted by Skerby View Post
    you're not gonna grow sqat after discing and waste your money on seed. good luck.
    your question is like this one, i have a hammer are screwdriver and a pocket knife, which one is the best to mine salt with?
    use the right tool for the right job.

    There's a whole bunch of us old farmers who've re-seeded pastures and hayfields by discing, broadcasting seed, then cultipacking, and done so with amazing success for a bunch of years. I'd question your knowledge and reasoning for making a statement of "absolute" nature, knowing full well myself that it WILL work in most cases.

    There are BETTER alternatives in some instances, IF available and IF afordable and IF conditions are right. But often the BEST alternative is the one you can afford.
    There are three kinds of men;
    1.) The ones that learn by reading
    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  10. #20
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    278
    Location
    Ohio
    Tractor
    JD 6330, JD 5055e, Ford 4000,

    Default Re: cultivator, disk, or spike harrow

    Those who say there are better options available than the three you have described are correct. However, as noted by FWJ, we often have to select the best option that is reasonably available to us. As far as I am concerned, the best option would be to HIRE SOMEONE to spray the pasture with Roundup, wait a few weeks until the weeds and grass start to grow again, spray with Roundup again, wait a few more weeks and spray a third time. Then hire someone to plant grass and clover with a no-till drill. Wait for the mixture to grow and pay someone to raise your goat and do all of the other work that needs done around your farm/home while you enjoy your family, friends and life in general. However, that isn't an option that is available to most of us.

    To answer your question, I believe the disc harrow would work best. Like FWJ, I have reseeded a lot of ground with a disc harrow. I wait until the ground is moist enough to expose some soil by disturbing the ground ever so lightly. Straighten your discs out while using the disc - a little angle goes a long way. Then broadcase your seed and cultipack. It works very well and should not damage your grass; provided you do not try to do this during the heat of the summer.

    You have indicated that you have Alabama clay and plan on planting white clover. Keep in mind that white clover does better in bottomland or areas that do not dry out too much during the summer. Red clover is a perennial that you might want to consider depending upon how much soil mositure you have throughout the year. The down side of red clover is that it will not likely last as many years as white clover.

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