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  1. #11
    Super Member Scooby074's Avatar
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    BX 25, ZD 326

    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    POR 15. UV may fade the paint, but its superficial only and wont effect the protection. Its relatively non hazordous relative to paints with ISO hardeners and its easy to get.

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    I use a steel spreader for fertilizer and what works for me is an air hose clean-out immediately after use followed by a wash, blow dry and spray with diesel fuel&oil mixture. It's five years old and looks new.
    I cannot speak of the other methods since I have never done the coating thing so I am not sure. But I do know the clean and oil approach has worked for me for a long time.
    ******

    May I be the kind of person my dogs think I am,

  3. #13
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    There are some other post treatments that will be a tad friendlier than the oil mix.

    soundguy

  4. #14
    Super Member
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    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    Quote Originally Posted by Soundguy View Post
    There are some other post treatments that will be a tad friendlier than the oil mix.

    soundguy

    But how doyou get the covering in and between all the nooks and crannies? How doyou coat something and be sure no rust trapped underneath?

    I know you understand paints and coatings from reading your prior posts on things so you have a good track record and I have learned from you. How would i treat my fertilizer spreader, for example? I am all ears to a better idea and cleaning like I do each time is a pain.
    ******

    May I be the kind of person my dogs think I am,

  5. #15
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    Remove rust, then paint.. don't paint over rust.

    things like naval jelly eat rust.

    soundguy

  6. #16
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    http://www.melrosechem.com/english/data_eng/hs0420.pdf

    A product like this is maybe what you are looking for.
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
    Livin in a
    Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones

  7. #17
    Super Member
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    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    Having spread a lot of fertizer over the years I would like to offer a partial alternative to some of the above posts. Yes, for protecting solid panels of steel these are the right things to do with coatings and such. Most of the rust, however, won't form there.

    The nitrogen-urea-fertilizer that we use and is the topic at hand is like sulfuric acid in it's ability to eat steel. I have found it is not so much the solid surfaces that are the problem but the connectors BETWEEN them and all the small parts associated with these low-priced spreaders.
    The inability to coat all of these parts and the tendency of them to vibrate usually cleans them to bare steel shorty after use. Even if a coating would stick to them initially, it would vibrate off from sharp edge contact and the urea would certainally attack or wick under those connecting parts and surfaces without being wash removed and re-coated with something that would wick into the tiny surfaces to protect the clean bare steel. No one suggests a slathering of motor oil but an air-pressure cleaned, washed and air-pressure dried spreader sprayed with a small about of diesel fuel and oil (synth if you want) will do the job better than other methods I have seen. I've found it to be the only way.

    Even the plastic/metal Vicon small parts will rot if not properly cleaned. The Vicon I had had a lot of carbon steel and castings blended in with the plastic and stainless.
    Just my two cents here but coat away at the solid surfaces but spray some sort of wicking oil into the nooks and crannies after clean and dry would be my personal opinion.
    ******

    May I be the kind of person my dogs think I am,

  8. #18
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
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    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    Just my two cents here but coat away at the solid surfaces but spray some sort of wicking oil into the nooks and crannies after clean and dry would be my personal opinion.
    That does sound like sound advice.

    Would a commercial undercoating for vehicles work for this purpose?
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
    Livin in a
    Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones

  9. #19
    Silver Member
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    Elmvale Ontario Canada
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    Kubota L245dt

    Default Re: Preserving a steel spreader

    Thank you all for your ideas. I think a combination of all is what I'll go for as soon as I source out the products
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.
    Benjamin Franklin

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