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  1. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    39
    Location
    Nampa, Idaho
    Tractor
    BX 24

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    You'll need a manure spreaded, check this out.
    Enviro Spreader

  2. #12
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    118
    Location
    San Marcos, CA
    Tractor
    John Deere 4320, Kubota B2710HST

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    Quote Originally Posted by RWolf View Post
    BoxBlade uses, there are many.
    Also good for spreading sand in and leveling an arena.
    Bill Walker, San Marcos (San Diego County), CA
    '08 JD 4320 eHydro, '00 Kubota B2710HSD, caretaker of a '44 Ford 2N

  3. #13
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    17,728
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    We don't have the budget to afford all kinds of expensive implements
    Why not start with the post hole digger, Fel, and a diamond harrow for dragging.

    Fel for collecting and stacking manure for compost. Later it can be used to spread the compost. It's not the best for spreading but will work. You may also want to look into forks and or hay spears for moving fence posts and bales and other such stuff.

    The diamond harrow for dragging the arena and pastures.

    On the arena some folks get quite fussy about preparation so do some investigation in that area as the diamond harrow is not ideal.
    Egon
    50 years behind the times
    Livin in a
    Worn out skin bag filled with rattlin bones

  4. #14
    Veteran Member pitt_md's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    1,030
    Location
    Pine Island, MN
    Tractor
    Kubota MX5000

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    I have 30 acres and two horses. A few acres of that are hay.

    I don't have a arena but I do have a 60' round pen. My round pen is just dirt at this point. I use my boxblade with the teeth down to dig it up a bit and level it out. It's not ideal but it works. The tractor and boxblade are to big for the round pen so I have to move the panels out to allow the equipment room to do a good job.

    I use my landscape rake with gage wheels to rake the pasture. Once again this is not an ideal setup but it does work.

    I have a 50 bushel belt driven manure spreader. I am not very impressed with this spreader. I tried to save money and get the less expensive unit. Do not get a spreader that uses belts to power the beaters/conveyor.

    My PHD is from fleet farm. I use the 9" drill for fencing. This has been a good buy to this point.

  5. #15

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    Quote Originally Posted by Egon View Post
    Why not start with the post hole digger, Fel, and a diamond harrow for dragging.
    This is probably the way we'll go for now. We have the FEL (and already got it dirty ). A PHD is next, because we already have plans for it Just gotta decide on which one to get. I think a diamond / chain drag is also going to be purchased shortly just to be able to do the basic stuff for now.

    Sounds like a box blade should also be in our future. Besides the stuff i mentioned, we also have some grading work to do where we want to reroute / rearrange a dirt driveway a bit and do some work on our trailer parking lot.

    And then a mower of course, although our neighbor has a tractor & both a bush hog and finishing mower, and he said he's happy to help us out mow the pastures, so we may be able to hold off on those for a little bit longer.

    So many implements!

    On the arena some folks get quite fussy about preparation so do some investigation in that area as the diamond harrow is not ideal.
    I had noticed! It seems there are a ton of different tools out there to do footing maintenance. Makes it hard to figure out which one is good for our situation. So for now i think we'll start with the chain drag and go from there.

    I have a 50 bushel belt driven manure spreader. I am not very impressed with this spreader. I tried to save money and get the less expensive unit. Do not get a spreader that uses belts to power the beaters/conveyor.
    Thanks, i think we'll and up going with a PTO driven one. The rotating drum ones (like from jmarotz's post) seem nice too, but they're not cheap either. I'll have to do a little more reading up on 'm.

  6. #16
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    48,583
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    You've got a CUT sized machine... Cat 1 implements are what you'll want to look for. 5' should be about right for rough mowers and box blades.

    A flexible-tine drag harrow makes a great pasture drag and will smooth the riding areena as well.

    soundguy

  7. #17
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    236
    Location
    Fairbanks Alaska
    Tractor
    Kubota B8200, 1953 International "Super C"

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    I have horses and have found a local rental company that handles 3 pt impelments. I have rented several items, and they have a tiller that they rent for 120 a day. I buy impelments that I can't rent first, and after using a couple rentals have found that I don't need some as much as others.

    I really want a manure spreader, but new is expensive and there are no used ones for sale in alaska. The small horse farm ones are $2000.00 very quickly, and they go up from there. So I am waiting. manure is the biggest item that I have to deal with, I mow ounce a month, drag the Paddock 3 times a year, push snow when needed (a rear blade was my first impelment) but I have to deal with manure every week.

    good luck and enjoy your new tractor

  8. #18
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2,943

    Default Re: For a small horse farm?

    From your initial post I suggest.
    Chain harrow - (not sure how that equates to "English harrow", maybe same/similar but I'm not familiar with the term) for arena dragging and pastures, breaking up manure in pastures and paddocks.

    Post hole diggers - the 3 point ones aren't necessarily the huge labor saving devices they are sold as.
    I am in rocky New England and 3 pt PHDs get screwed in here, typically with a flight wedged around a rock.
    UN-screwing them is a 3 ft pipe wrench job, plus sweat.
    This is MONEY, but if you are in a rocky area at least consider a REVERSIBLE hydraulic unit - maybe ~$1700 from Wildkat.
    That would also need hydraulic power to the FEL bucket area - MORE money.
    Once you have the power up there a grapple is but a short step away - not that you NEED one for a small horse farm.
    If you have SSQA loader you can probably rent one from a local Sunbelt or other skid steer rental outlet.

    On the general question of fences on horse farms;
    Post and rail LOOKS nice, so do posts and boards, but they restrict you (once the holes are drilled/dug).
    It can be worth while to buy electric fences and "step in" posts.
    The advantage being that you can MOVE these to rotate paddocks, or just to try different divisions of your property.

    I like flail mowers, for any given width they are shorter than rotaries and usually lighter, they don't chuck rocks either.

    Not to boast, but I am fairly confident that I could drag a 60 ft round pen with a Cat 1 tractor and 8ft wide chain harrow without painting myself into a (err, there are no corners).
    One way is to hang the chain harrow from the bucket and drive backwards, it sweeps OUT on the curve and it can be completely picked up.
    I don't know the tractor you mentioned, but even the smallest ones should be able to get a 4 ft long section up off the ground so you can maneuver.

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