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  1. #1
    New Member bstnh1's Avatar
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    Massey Ferguson GC2300

    Default Log Splitter Question

    I recently picked up a used MTD 31 ton splitter. It doesn't appear to have been used much, but it seems to have a lot of play between the sides of the wedge plate and the edge of the beam which allows the wedge to move a bit from side to side. Anyone know if play in this area is required or if there should be only a minimum amount?

  2. #2
    Veteran Member bigtiller's Avatar
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    central Iowa
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    JD 2720

    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    How much play are you talking about?
    HAVE FUN

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    2720

  3. #3
    New Member bstnh1's Avatar
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    Massey Ferguson GC2300

    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    With the ram extended there's probably a half inch either way.

  4. #4
    J_J
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    Power-Trac 1445, KUBOTA B-9200HST

    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    If the material that rides the edge has worn down that is sandwiched the two clamping assembly's, you could replace it and be as tight an when new. You need some play, and it should be lubed often.
    J.J.

    When I works, I works hard. When I sits and thinks, I goes to sleep.

    Git er done.

  5. #5
    Gold Member soulasphil's Avatar
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    JD 3520 powerreverser

    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    Half an inch seems to be about right. On my 2009 13 ton splitter the play is about one centimetre.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Log Splitter Question-dscf3063-r-olution-de-l   Log Splitter Question-dscf3067-r-olution-de-l   Log Splitter Question-dscf3070-r-olution-de-l   Log Splitter Question-dscf3072-r-olution-de-l  
    3520 PR

  6. #6
    Veteran Member JDGreenGrass's Avatar
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    John Deere 770

    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    Quote Originally Posted by soulasphil View Post
    Half an inch seems to be about right. On my 2009 13 ton splitter the play is about one centimetre.
    Wow.!! Beautiful wood.

    Is that truely a 13 ton splitter.??

    I would like to have a 22 ton splitter, I just don't know how this "ton" rateing relates to splitting. In other words, if yours is a 13 ton, I am thinking a 22 ton splitter would be more than adequate for most firewoods.

    Does your 13t split Oak.??

    Nice unit, by the way.
    JD770 '92 4x4 SMC FEL JD Ballast Box 6' CountyLine Back Blade 6' CountyLine Rake CountyLine CarryAll
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  7. #7
    Gold Member soulasphil's Avatar
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    JD 3520 powerreverser

    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    Quote Originally Posted by JDGreenGrass View Post
    Wow.!! Beautiful wood.

    Is that truely a 13 ton splitter.??

    I would like to have a 22 ton splitter, I just don't know how this "ton" rateing relates to splitting. In other words, if yours is a 13 ton, I am thinking a 22 ton splitter would be more than adequate for most firewoods.

    Does your 13t split Oak.??

    Nice unit, by the way.
    13 tons is the pressure applied by the hydraulic cylinder, it is one of the elements to take into consideration. But you must also take into account the rigidity of the frame, the shape of the wedge, the knots in the wood, etc.
    This splitter does split oak, the difficulty is not the wood being hard but the fibers not being straight. I get into trouble when there are lots of knots and branches stemming off the main piece of timber.
    I chose the model because it appeared to be compatible with the performance of the 3520's hydraulics. I think a 22 ton splitter would split anything, but do you have enough oil flow to feed such an enormous cylinder ?
    3520 PR

  8. #8
    Super Member clemsonfor's Avatar
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    Yanmar YM2000

    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    My gosh is that wood for your home fire place its huge, length and diameter still, must be the big final pieces once its hot.
    YM2000. MF dirt scoop,4' Jbar bushhog,boompole, LMC 12-16 disk harrow, 4' Atlas boxblade (with rippers). 1980 chevy K10,1990 ford ranger 2wd (285K miles),1997 saturn SL2 (twin cam!!),2001Toyota Higlander
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  9. #9
    J_J
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    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    The pressure is the driving force. Same cyl with different pressures.

    4 in cyl, 2 in shaft, 3000 psi = 37,699 lbs = 18.84 T

    ------------------- 2500 psi = 31,416 lbs = 15.7 T

    --------------------2000 psi = 25,133 lbs = 12.56 T

    GPM will dictate the speed of a complete cycle. The more GPM's, the cycle time is reduced/shorter.

    Fast extend will decrease the cycle time also.
    J.J.

    When I works, I works hard. When I sits and thinks, I goes to sleep.

    Git er done.

  10. #10
    Veteran Member JDGreenGrass's Avatar
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    Default Re: Log Splitter Question

    Quote Originally Posted by soulasphil View Post
    13 tons is the pressure applied by the hydraulic cylinder, it is one of the elements to take into consideration. But you must also take into account the rigidity of the frame, the shape of the wedge, the knots in the wood, etc.
    This splitter does split oak, the difficulty is not the wood being hard but the fibers not being straight. I get into trouble when there are lots of knots and branches stemming off the main piece of timber.
    I chose the model because it appeared to be compatible with the performance of the 3520's hydraulics. I think a 22 ton splitter would split anything, but do you have enough oil flow to feed such an enormous cylinder ?
    I should have been more clear....I am wanting a stand alone unit, not pto.

    Thanks.
    JD770 '92 4x4 SMC FEL JD Ballast Box 6' CountyLine Back Blade 6' CountyLine Rake CountyLine CarryAll
    64" Frontier Snowblower

    Favorite Color....Green

    The sky was yellow and the sun was blue.

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