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  1. #1

    Default Dumb digging question

    Ok, so Iíve pretty much decided on and L3010, but I still have a fairly basic question. One of the (many) things I want a tractor for is to spare my back when digging various sizes of holes for planting trees as well as for digging trenches for laying wire, etc. Obviously, a backhoe could do this really well, but at great cost. A posthole digger would be less costly but lacks flexibility for different types of digging projects and probably wouldnít work too well anyway in my rocky clay soil. It seems to me that with all the hydraulic power at my disposal either up front at the loader or in the back at the 3 point there ought to be some simple way of digging various size holes and trenches without buying a backhoe. There seems to be a key missing implement in the compact tractor arsenal, perhaps something akin to the new Bobcat digger attachment http://www.bobcat.com:80/products/at...tt_digger.html. Has anyone used this attachment? Alternatively, can a rear scoop dig holes and trenches? Or should I just consider strapping a shovel onto the front of my bucket? (only half kidding about the shovel!)


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    179
    Location
    central Indiana
    Tractor
    L3010 HST

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    I have not used that Bobcat attachment so I can't comment on that. A rear scoop can dig a little but not worth the time and effort. I used one for a little while until I got my loader on my old tractor.

    I actually have dug some holes here in the past couple weeks moving small trees and bushes for my wifes landscaping project with my front loader. Of course every hole is 60" wide. That worked ok for me. Its amazing how deep you can go if you do it right. You could do the same for trenches. It's just not the best way to do it. I think there was another thread on this a couple months ago. Of course you are not going as deep compared to using a backhoe. Yes backhoes are expensive but if you have A LOT to do it may be worth it to bite the bullit and get one. It's OK, I give you permission and then theres about a hundred guys here that would love to borrow it! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    Brad, kubota L3010HST, loader, R4 tires
    Pictures at http://albums.photopoint.com/j/Album...9207&a=9183978

  3. #3
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    1,344
    Location
    West Virginia (Eastern Panhandle)
    Tractor
    '78 Kubota B6100DT

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    Steve:

    Another thread (or was it over on the compact tractor board?) described the use of a middle buster plow for digging trenches. That's what I'm going to try when I run the power out to my barn in a couple of weeks.

    Bill


  4. #4

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    610
    Location
    Ontario
    Tractor
    Ford 1710: Loader, Hoe, Snowblower, Box scrapper & 3ph Forks

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    It's an aggravation I suppose. There are 3ph versions of just about every known type of equipment. A tractor is a mobile power source. However, when you get the tractor, you get the power but not the tools to use the power. I think most people always want another implement, and have to confine themselves to an annual implement budget or go bankrupt.

    Trouble is that most tractor equipment is designed for commercial duty. It's supposed to last for a long time and be worked fairly hard, and it's not manufactured by mass-production methods. As a result it's real expensive stuff to have for a person who uses it part time. By the same token, it's priced right for somebody who makes a living from it.

    I had to get used to the idea myself. I have to work the tractor for it to make me happy, and to do that I need the tools. Between new tools and maintenance, the tractor is going to take a chunk out of my wallet each and every year, and probably a bigger chunk than the money I save by not having to call contractors. If I try to scrimp and get by with something that's not really the right tool, then I end up struggling with a job, and probably not too happy. My tractor budget keeps the tractor working and me happy. If I want to scrimp a bit, I go for 'after market' brand equipment, look for used equipment or go to farm sales.

    Regarding your digging question. A backhoe is the most general purpose digging tool available. For some types of jobs, you can get by with other things, like plows to trench, but they're not going to work for every kind of trench. If digging is a main reason to get a tractor, then a back hoe will probably pay for itself (at least in terms of time and aggravation) in the long run. Regarding the shovel, it looks like it would need the same hydraulics as a loader. Plus, it would need side-shift to dump the dirt. It probably doesn't dig too deep and likely would be almost as expensive as a backhoe. Keep in mind that you might trench down 4' for electrical line under a drive or a well line below frost level. You do need a hoe lots of times.




  5. #5
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    340
    Location
    Fairfax, Franklin County, Vermont
    Tractor
    1999 Cub Cadet 7260

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    Hi Northern Dave

    I don't know exactly where you are located, but up here in northern Vt, there is a used implement dealer that usually has a few used 3 point hoes for sale, along with lot's of other stuff. Something like this may be an alternative to buying new and completely blowing your budget. If you want the name of the outfit send me an E-mail.

    Corm


  6. #6
    New Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Posts
    22
    Tractor
    Ford 1220 4WD HST; John Deere GT235

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    Northern Dave: Digging projects (planting and transplanting large shrubs and trees, digging stumps, trenching, building drywells, pulling up larger rocks) were one of the main categories of work I got my Ford 1220 for (in retrospect, a larger machine would have been better, but that's a different issue). Hoping to avoid the cost of a backhoe, I originally got a post-hole digger with the idea that it would at least do the grunt work of punching the holes I needed, even if I ended up doing some shoveling of the loosened dirt by hand. Frankly, it didn't work. I have also used my FEL for some digging. If there's a large enough area, you can gradually excavate with it, but I still didn't eliminate a lot of hand digging. I considered a rear scoop, but my dealer advised that they weren't terribly effective (more of a carrying tool than a digging one). I finally threw in the towel last year and got a NH 756C backhoe (subframe mount, manufactured by SMC). It isn't perfect; the reach is somewhat limited, my tractor is a bit too light (gets dragged around when digging hard), and mounting it is pretty involved, since the subframe turned out to be incompatible with the mid-mount mower linkage. Those quibbles notwithstanding, the backhoe really is the answer. While I'm still appalled by the cost, I wish in retrospect that I'd bought it years ago.

    AndyH


  7. #7
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    10,157
    Location
    Triangle Of North Carolina
    Tractor
    JD 4700

    Default Re: Dumb digging question


    I'm afraid AndyH is correct.

    I ended up getting the JD 48 backhoe with my 4700 tractor. It was very painful to purchase. When I make the first payment 12/1/2000 I'm sure it will be even more painful! 8-)

    But, I have put 32 hours on my 4700 in the last two weekends and I realise that the backhoe was needed as well as the correct tool for my use. Which as this point is digging ditches for culverts/cleaning ditches and removing stumps. I'm not having problem removing the 12 inch and smaller stumps but I have a 24 inch pine tree with a root ball that is 5 feet in diameter and 2-3 feet deep. Well my little JD 48 ain't moving this bad boy. But it did allow me to dig 3-4 feet deep all around the stump. I have a couple more ideas on how to remove the stump from **** and then I'll be calling the dynamite man. 8-) I ain't kidding either! 8-)

    I'm also learning quite a bit about different tree's root systems.

    If you have serious digging to do a back hoe is the answer.

    The JD 48 is VERY simple to mount to the JD 4000 series tractors. It only takes five minutes or so which is one of the reasons I bought JD.

    Hope this helps...
    Dan McCarty


  8. #8

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    OK, I get the idea, and I should probably just shutup and get a backhoe! I still can't help wondering, though, if the Kasco Uni-Hitch, which enables a tractor loader to use skid steer attachments, could be used effectively with something like the Bobcat digger mentioned above (watch the video!) or perhaps the New Holland tree spade by FFC http://www.newholland.com/constructi.../treespade.asp (see the bottom of this web page). Would using an implement like this on the loader of an L3010 put too much strain on the loader?


  9. #9
    Elite Member Richard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    3,161
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Tractor
    Fullsized JCB Loader/Backhoe

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    NorthernDave

    Guess your summation on just getting a backhoe is right on. I don't own a tractor, but a full sized construction loader/backhoe. First thing like this I have *EVER* owned and do I love the backhoe. It is FAR more versital and fun than I would have thought. When I bought this beast, I was primarily interested in the loader so I could transport cut wood and push things around on the ground, hoe was gravey. I knew I had some use for hoe, but now, after having it, I probably use the hoe 40% of the time.

    Have you looked into renting one? I rented a kubota L-35 for a weekend. It came with loader/backhoe and box blade. My $250 (included delivery/pickup charges) bought me 10 hours of clock. Though I never knew to look, I *SWEAR* that I spent more than 10 hours of "watch" time on it without clocking in 10 hours of it's "clock" time. I think that was because when I was using the backhoe, it was at, or just above idle. It was MORE than enough for my needs at that level, not to mention it is a VERY fast swinging hoe. Really took a while to get used to, and NEVER really got "in control" of it. Really a zippy unit, but I got loads done with it.

    Just a thought (that I'm sure you've already thought of)


  10. #10
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    460
    Location
    Goochland & Fluvanna Counties, VA
    Tractor
    NH TN90F; BX-2200; Bobcats 430 & A300; Liebherr 621C, Exmark XP

    Default Re: Dumb digging question

    11/13

    Hi, Richard,

    I have a Kasco Unihitch (model UH-II, to give me SSL attachment capability) on the Alo/Quicke 3000# lift capacity loader with my NH TN90F, a much heavier combo than your 3010, and it ain't designed to take the kinds of stresses you could put on it with that tree spade in front. SSLoaders are, even though their lift capacities might fool you in comparison to compact & ag tractors.

    Backhoe (preferably with subframe) is your best solution, though a used TLB might cost less, if your use is occasional. Or the rental Brutus's master suggested (but what would be the fun in that?).

    Or you could get an excavator like I want.

    [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img][img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img][img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img][img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img][img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Good luck,
    Jim

    Want to scare your wife? Show her the attached pic!
    [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]


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