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  1. #1
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    2011 John Deere 5055E

    Default Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    I've got a 5055 John Deere and am considering buying a King Kutter 6.5 Foot Box Frame Disc Harrow to work on my food plots. Any experiences with the durability of this particular Kink Kutter disc? I've read some reviews that caution on the durability particularly the welds. My farm terrain is slightly sloped and has quite a few rocks.

  2. #2
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    Deere 110tlb, 4520, x749, L130

    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    There are lots of good equipment manufacturers out there but I have looked at these and like them. I like the TH series with pillow block bearings and would consider the 20 or 22" blade model, it is offered in a 6'8" size.

    Agriculture TH Series Tandem Discs - Monroe Tufline

  3. #3
    Elite Member bullbreaker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    Quote Originally Posted by jenkinsph View Post
    There are lots of good equipment manufacturers out there but I have looked at these and like them. I like the TH series with pillow block bearings and would consider the 20 or 22" blade model, it is offered in a 6'8" size.
    Agriculture TH Series Tandem Discs - Monroe Tufline

    Agree ! Lots of other brands out there for a little extra money.(a@b eagle-line,leinbach,Howse,Landpride,etc).
    I could be wrong but some frontier disc might be made by Monroe/Tuff.
    Also "Chief" every King Krutter,Countyline,disc I have ever seen "in person" has round disc in rears not serrated knotched discs like on front.Even though here on TBN site I have seen King Krutters with rear knotched disc.Not saying ones better than others I hear they both have there pro's and con's.
    Have you also checked on Craigslist for a good used one ?

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  4. #4
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    JD2010

    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    I've read many concerns about the angle-frame model and better reviews of the box-frame model. I bought one used recently. The welds looked decent and the weight was impressive. The guy before me claimed to do ~150 acres with it over 6 years. I checked it over and the unit had no repairs. I have only had the chance to work about an acre of plots and another 1/2 acre worth of test areas just to see how well it'd work.

    On previously worked ground without tall vegetation it worked great in a single pass.

    On previously worked ground with weeds over knee high, it sort of worked, but I decided it'd be better to hook up the mower and disc in a single pass afterwards.

    On non-worked ground that was short cover, I was impressed with how well it worked.

    Based on my research I think it's a great value overall for what it is. A 3pt of this size is seemingly trendy these days. I could find a bunch of 12'-14' transport discs of name brands for only slightly more than I paid, but there just a bit large for a 40-50HP tractor.

    I think it will hold up for you unless you're really ramming it at fast speeds through the rocks or making tight turns with it still in the ground.

  5. #5
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    The secret to success with ANY disc is lbs per blade....Obviously, the heavier, the better they'll work. Old school thinking used to be having disc blades about 6" apart. Later on, they moved 'em out to 7" +. Some larger disc's will have 9" or even 11" spacings. Typically, the wider the spacing, the larger diameter the blades SHOULD be. Larger diameter blades will also typically have more "dish" to them.

    Just about all "modern day" 3-point disc's are set with 7-1/2" disc spacings, although I've seen a few with 6-1/2". A very few will have 9" spacings. Those are generally (but not always) higher end heavy duty models. Most old "drag disc's" had narrow spaced blades. They tended to try to roll on top of the ground rather than IN the ground, creating the false sensation of being "easy to pull"....In fact they ARE easier to pull, but at the expense of not working very deep. Simple "fizzix" tells us that the less work you're doing the easier it is/the MORE work you're doing the more effort it requires....

    Frame weight is somewhat relative to frame strength (but not as a hard and fast rule...) As with ANY ground engaging tool, there is a great deal of stress and frame loading when working. In many cases, BOLTED frames will allow some flexing without cracking welds. WELDED frames are so rigid, there's just not any "give" in most cases. With that. welded frames CAN crack.

    Also worth attention is the upper 3-point structure. With mounted tillage tools, they tend to want to rotate up and over the lower link pins.....That puts top link and upper 3-point structure of the disc in compression. I've seen a few instances where the strut running from the top link attach point down to the rear of the disc will bend or buckle, allowing the rear of the disc to raise up (and over) When applying extra ballast on a disc, it's good to equally distribute the weight front to rear for this reason. Putting all the weight on the front of the disc frame will compound the problem in many cases.

    Without a doubt, the best 3-point disc I've ever been around is an old design....The Massey Ferguson #25. It has enough built in weight, and is well balanced, so it does a great job without piling on additional weights.

    3-point disc's, if set correctly and weighted sufficiently will do an excellent job. Their rigid frame levels better than a flexible frame (such as was common on older drag type and some early wheel disc's with floating gangs) After all, it's about doing the best job, not creating the easiest way to spend time....

    Just make certain the frame is strong enough to handle additional ballast (if needed) and you have enough lift capacity to handle a ballasted disc.

    Notched blades have an advantage when tearing up hard soils/turf. They have a DISadvantage with regards to strength and wear. If you have a lot of rocks, notched blades are more prone to breaking than solid blades. Also, with less metal to begin with, notched blades will wear down quicker. It's a common practice to put notched blades on the front gangs and solids on the rear as sort of a compromise. (As I have done on all 3 of my disc's......MF25 3-point, IH350 wheel , IH496 wheel)

    Roller bearing/ball bearing disc's are great IF YOU HAVE SEALED BEARINGS....Open roller bearings need constant attention. Cast iron "boxings" can continue to function way beyond the point when wear is beginning to show. I've seen boxings with 1/2" of wear still operating with no issues. Just pump 'em full of grease before each days use and life goes on.
    There are three kinds of men;
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    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  6. #6
    Platinum Member KYDan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    Quote Originally Posted by Farmwithjunk View Post
    The secret to success with ANY disc is lbs per blade....Obviously, the heavier, the better they'll work. Old school thinking used to be having disc blades about 6" apart. Later on, they moved 'em out to 7" +. Some larger disc's will have 9" or even 11" spacings. Typically, the wider the spacing, the larger diameter the blades SHOULD be. Larger diameter blades will also typically have more "dish" to them.

    Just about all "modern day" 3-point disc's are set with 7-1/2" disc spacings, although I've seen a few with 6-1/2". A very few will have 9" spacings. Those are generally (but not always) higher end heavy duty models. Most old "drag disc's" had narrow spaced blades. They tended to try to roll on top of the ground rather than IN the ground, creating the false sensation of being "easy to pull"....In fact they ARE easier to pull, but at the expense of not working very deep. Simple "fizzix" tells us that the less work you're doing the easier it is/the MORE work you're doing the more effort it requires....

    Frame weight is somewhat relative to frame strength (but not as a hard and fast rule...) As with ANY ground engaging tool, there is a great deal of stress and frame loading when working. In many cases, BOLTED frames will allow some flexing without cracking welds. WELDED frames are so rigid, there's just not any "give" in most cases. With that. welded frames CAN crack.

    Also worth attention is the upper 3-point structure. With mounted tillage tools, they tend to want to rotate up and over the lower link pins.....That puts top link and upper 3-point structure of the disc in compression. I've seen a few instances where the strut running from the top link attach point down to the rear of the disc will bend or buckle, allowing the rear of the disc to raise up (and over) When applying extra ballast on a disc, it's good to equally distribute the weight front to rear for this reason. Putting all the weight on the front of the disc frame will compound the problem in many cases.

    Without a doubt, the best 3-point disc I've ever been around is an old design....The Massey Ferguson #25. It has enough built in weight, and is well balanced, so it does a great job without piling on additional weights.

    3-point disc's, if set correctly and weighted sufficiently will do an excellent job. Their rigid frame levels better than a flexible frame (such as was common on older drag type and some early wheel disc's with floating gangs) After all, it's about doing the best job, not creating the easiest way to spend time....

    Just make certain the frame is strong enough to handle additional ballast (if needed) and you have enough lift capacity to handle a ballasted disc.

    Notched blades have an advantage when tearing up hard soils/turf. They have a DISadvantage with regards to strength and wear. If you have a lot of rocks, notched blades are more prone to breaking than solid blades. Also, with less metal to begin with, notched blades will wear down quicker. It's a common practice to put notched blades on the front gangs and solids on the rear as sort of a compromise. (As I have done on all 3 of my disc's......MF25 3-point, IH350 wheel , IH496 wheel)

    Roller bearing/ball bearing disc's are great IF YOU HAVE SEALED BEARINGS....Open roller bearings need constant attention. Cast iron "boxings" can continue to function way beyond the point when wear is beginning to show. I've seen boxings with 1/2" of wear still operating with no issues. Just pump 'em full of grease before each days use and life goes on.
    I totally agree with Farm with junk about the old MF25, I had a set and let them get away from me which was a big mistake. I bought a new set of the King Kutter discs and returned them to the dealer as for my use they were unsatisfactory. If you find a set of the old MF discs and they are in decent shape you won't find a better cutting harrow, however, a lot of them you find on the used lots are pretty ragged out and will require some work to be useful. Replacing the discs can be something of a chore. I am looking for a good set of 3pt. harrows in the 7' range and following this thread. I found a local used dealer that has a set of the MF 25's, but they are rough and I don't want to refurbish them. Is anyone aware of new harrows that approach the effectiveness of the old Masseys?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    How about some advice on the angle adjustment of the gangs.

  8. #8
    Super Member Farmwithjunk's Avatar
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    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    Quote Originally Posted by Bartcephus View Post
    How about some advice on the angle adjustment of the gangs.

    Not every brand of disc will work the same way, but with all of 'em I've ever used, they seem to work best with the front gang set one notch less than fully "aggressive" and the rear gang TWO notches less than full tilt..... Set fully aggressive, they seem to dig plenty well enough, but leave the ground too out of level for my benefit. And personally, I prefer front and rear gangs to be operating at the same depth. Usually, front gangs will try to dig in and rears raise up to where the rear isn't as deep. That'll throw more dirt towards the outside than what the rear will bring back towards the center (if that makes any sense...) Play with speed to see what nets the best results too. I prefer 4-1/2 to 5mph in most cases. Too slow and you get little soil action. Too fast and the disc will try to ride on top of the ground instead of digging.

    Long story short, I like th eresults from a good RIGID FRAME disc, running level side to side and front to rear, with gangs set not quite as aggressive as the maximum settings.
    There are three kinds of men;
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    2.) The few who learn by observation
    3.) The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    Plenty of good advice has been given. All that I will add is that I owned the 6-1/2' KK Disc for nearly 7 yrs and it hasn't crack or broken yet although I did replace a couple of bearings and I bought them from Agri-Supply. My experience is exactly what one of the posters said about previously worked ground. My last job was for a neighbor that had raised corn this year and wanted the ground ready to plant some kind of grass. Well I went over it twice and left, the fellow came to my house later and wanted me to do more, he said it wasn't soft enough and the harrow didn't go deep enough. I had told previous to starting the work that depending on how the disc cut that it might take rototilling after the disc, but, that would be extra. and I repeated what I had said earlier that I did primary tillage and secondary with the tiller would cost him extra. He went away mad. I do think get the heaviest disc you can find that you can pull with your tractor. bjr

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Buying a 3 point hitch disc

    Quote Originally Posted by Farmwithjunk View Post
    The secret to success with ANY disc is lbs per blade....Obviously, the heavier, the better they'll work. Old school thinking used to be having disc blades about 6" apart. Later on, they moved 'em out to 7" +. Some larger disc's will have 9" or even 11" spacings. Typically, the wider the spacing, the larger diameter the blades SHOULD be. Larger diameter blades will also typically have more "dish" to them.

    Just about all "modern day" 3-point disc's are set with 7-1/2" disc spacings, although I've seen a few with 6-1/2". A very few will have 9" spacings. Those are generally (but not always) higher end heavy duty models. Most old "drag disc's" had narrow spaced blades. They tended to try to roll on top of the ground rather than IN the ground, creating the false sensation of being "easy to pull"....In fact they ARE easier to pull, but at the expense of not working very deep. Simple "fizzix" tells us that the less work you're doing the easier it is/the MORE work you're doing the more effort it requires....

    Frame weight is somewhat relative to frame strength (but not as a hard and fast rule...) As with ANY ground engaging tool, there is a great deal of stress and frame loading when working. In many cases, BOLTED frames will allow some flexing without cracking welds. WELDED frames are so rigid, there's just not any "give" in most cases. With that. welded frames CAN crack.

    Also worth attention is the upper 3-point structure. With mounted tillage tools, they tend to want to rotate up and over the lower link pins.....That puts top link and upper 3-point structure of the disc in compression. I've seen a few instances where the strut running from the top link attach point down to the rear of the disc will bend or buckle, allowing the rear of the disc to raise up (and over) When applying extra ballast on a disc, it's good to equally distribute the weight front to rear for this reason. Putting all the weight on the front of the disc frame will compound the problem in many cases.

    Without a doubt, the best 3-point disc I've ever been around is an old design....The Massey Ferguson #25. It has enough built in weight, and is well balanced, so it does a great job without piling on additional weights.

    3-point disc's, if set correctly and weighted sufficiently will do an excellent job. Their rigid frame levels better than a flexible frame (such as was common on older drag type and some early wheel disc's with floating gangs) After all, it's about doing the best job, not creating the easiest way to spend time....

    Just make certain the frame is strong enough to handle additional ballast (if needed) and you have enough lift capacity to handle a ballasted disc.

    Notched blades have an advantage when tearing up hard soils/turf. They have a DISadvantage with regards to strength and wear. If you have a lot of rocks, notched blades are more prone to breaking than solid blades. Also, with less metal to begin with, notched blades will wear down quicker. It's a common practice to put notched blades on the front gangs and solids on the rear as sort of a compromise. (As I have done on all 3 of my disc's......MF25 3-point, IH350 wheel , IH496 wheel)

    Roller bearing/ball bearing disc's are great IF YOU HAVE SEALED BEARINGS....Open roller bearings need constant attention. Cast iron "boxings" can continue to function way beyond the point when wear is beginning to show. I've seen boxings with 1/2" of wear still operating with no issues. Just pump 'em full of grease before each days use and life goes on.
    I thoroughly enjoy reading your posts.
    RJJR

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