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  1. #1
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    Default fertilizer

    I just got back from Penn State two soil sample results and need some help interpreting them. The first says "0#N/A, 120# Phosphate/A, and 100# Potash/A). The second plot results are "200#N/A, 60# Phosphate/A, 260# Potash/A".

    What do these numbers correlate to as far as buying say a 10-10-10 fertilizer. What I am trying to find out is what fertilizer I need to buy to do the job for each plot. Certainly the first plot doesn't require a 0-120-100 fertilizer does it?

    Thanx,

    Jerry

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    southwest Indiana
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    Kubota BX2200

    Default Re: fertilizer

    I would interpret it as your first plot needs 0 pounds of Nitrogen per acre, 120 pounds of Phosphate per acre, and 100 pounds of Potash per acre. I've used fertilizers rated at 13-13-13, 27-3-3, 6-24-24, and 19-19-19. See if you can find a fertilizer where the first number is 0, such as 0-13-13. Best would be 0-12-10, then you could apply 10 bags of this per acre, or however the ratio works out.

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Northern Virginia
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    2001 New Holland TC40D w/16LA loader

    Default Re: fertilizer

    I believe it is pounds/acre - at least that is what my soil analysis says.
    Anything that is the same ratio will work. Ratios are nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium (n-p-k)
    10 bags of 0-12-10 will work if applied over an acre. At least that is what I understand...... [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]
    Mark

  4. #4
    Elite Member thcri's Avatar
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    Default Re: fertilizer

    I would go out and get yourself some 6-24-24. The little nitrogen that is in there won't hurt you a bit. In fact it may even help you some. Take your analysis into a company that sells farm chemicals and fertilizers. I would not mess with the Scott's brands or it's competitors. The ag dealer that you deal with can make a recomendation and help you decide how much to put on. With the 6-24-25 you should be able to cut the amount down. I don't know of anyone that stocks a 0-12-10.

    murph

  5. #5

    Join Date
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    Delaware
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    JD 4110 HST w/410 Loader and 60

    Default Re: fertilizer

    Here's a great article on setting up a nutrient replenishment plan written by Dan Haizlett of Spyker Spreader

    Replenishing Soil Nutrients

    Good luck

  6. #6
    Elite Member hazmat's Avatar
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    West Newbury, MA & Harrison, ME
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    Default Re: fertilizer

    Pete,

    Nice link, thanks for sharing. The local Lesco (Lawn equipment & supply co) is having a 20% off sale this week. I took my soil samples tonight, going to stop by tomorrow & buy some fertilizer. Can't wait to try out my new spreader. But I'll have to wait for the lawn to dry out a bit, or I'll sink [img]/forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Super Member
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    Default Re: fertilizer

    We can all give our opinions but take it to your local farm co-op or another place like it that can mix you up exactly what you need. You won't be wasting anything and you will get a mix tailor made specifically to your soil.

  8. #8

    Join Date
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    South Weber Utah
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    Default Re: fertilizer


    <font color="blue"> "0#N/A, 120# Phosphate/A, and 100# Potash/A). The second plot results are "200#N/A, 60# Phosphate/A, 260# Potash/A" </font>

    First plot: Needs NO nitrogen (which is pretty unusual), needs 120 lbs of phosphate (P2O5) and 100 lbs of potash per acre. If you could get it blended to your needs you would need 0-12-10 fert and 1000 lbs of it per acre. If you are using 10-10-10 you are close and would need 1200 lbs per acre to accommodate your highest demand, but that leaves you with 120 lbs of Nitrogen that is wasted and will likely leach into the soil. I'd try to find something with no nitrogen.

    Second plot needs 200 lbs of nitrogen per acre, 60 lbs of Phosphate per acre, and 260 lbs Potash per acre. The ideal mix would be 20-06-26 at 1000 lbs per acre. Using 10-10-10 would get you there, but you'd need 2000 lbs per acre and would still be short in potash and VERY long on the phosphate.

    Hope this helps.


  9. #9

    Join Date
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    Default Re: fertilizer

    FWIW, the results/recommendation provided to me by my local Ag extension were recommendations for pounds per acre and pounds per 1,000 square feet. Breaking the numbers down to pounds per 1,000 square feet is a much more usefull scale.

    Also, it is very, VERY important to understand that most recommendation are for a full year. The general recommendation is to apply your annual nutrients divided equally in 3 or 4 applications over the growing season, avoiding the dog days of summer and dead of winter.

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