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  1. #21
    Veteran Member Mike476's Avatar
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    Annapolis Valley, Nova Scotia
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    MF 135 Z134 Continental, MF 1660 Cab

    Default Re: hauling logs

    Definitely cut the logs to the lengths needed. I use chain around the tunnel of my BB, the blade is a safety that keeps me from getting too ambitious and prevents the front end from coming off the ground when I do.

    Handling is key, not only for skidding but also for milling, especially if you plan to mill the logs yourself. I've found I'm comfortable hauling those size butts out one at a time (especially fresh cut white pine, very heavy) but the tops I can sometimes take two or three at a time so the job isn't as lengthy as you might think. The key is not to be in a rush, any time spent working in the woods is time well spent, and as many have said, safety above all else!

    Good luck, stay safe and enjoy!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -massey-mill-013-jpg  

  2. #22
    Elite Member 300UGUY's Avatar
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    Apr 2004
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    3,398
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    Howell, Michigan
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    Kubota L3400, Farmall H

    Default Re: hauling logs

    I've yanked around some logs that size, I use my 3 pt boom pole. Using the hook point closest to the tractor. I don't lift the end of the log much, just a couple of inches, so that it is dragging, but not plowing. You will tear up the ground pretty good. I go slow, and keep the bucket low. I don't want to be field pizza.

  3. #23
    Veteran Member sparc's Avatar
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    NJ
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    JD 4410, NH TC-25, Bobcat M610, JD X534, Dig-It Model 158

    Default Re: hauling logs

    Quote Originally Posted by grnspot110 View Post
    Make yourself a log arch! You'll want it a little bigger than mine, but they work great. ~~ grnspot

    Didn't know what a log arch was but now that I see one it is along the lines of what I was thinking.

    Ever seen a grasshopper? Used for moving lengths of pipe. Difference is it has a long arm on it about 12' and its placed near the center of the pipe (or log in this case) so its got all the load.

    Grasshopper

    you can clobber one together for cheap. go to a junk yard and get a couple front spindles from a car with wheels. one 20' length of 2"x4"x1/4" tube steel and some scraps of other steel plus some chain and you are in business. If you don't have a welder you should be able to find someone who does and could put it all together for you.

  4. #24
    Veteran Member Gordon Gould's Avatar
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    NorthEastern, VT
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    Kubota L3010DT, Dresser TD7G Dozer

    Default Re: hauling logs

    Quote Originally Posted by monheganview View Post
    thanks all for the suggestions, images and comments...
    I will re-read the posts... but here are a few notes.
    I have "surveyed" the trees as best I could and at about 5' off the ground level the largest trees are 22 inches... so my initial 24" was for the butt end +/-.
    Comments that the B3030 is a smaller tractor are obviously correct, I go to the dealer and look at some of the bigger machines and they do have more weight and steel than what I have, but I am fortunate to have what I have and so am attempting to not trash the machine.... that's why I posted.
    The specs say the 3ph will lift 2139 pounds at the lift point and 1300 pounds 24 inches behind the lift point... so these logs at 16 ft. would be very close to maxing out the lift arms with the box blade option... there is better geometry with the log closer to the lift arm pivot points. I have an "old farm" with virtually no buildings left, just old foundations and 15 acres of field and 70 of woods. The pine will be cut to build a shop-barn of a modest size....mostly for sheathing... so YES I can cut the logs shorter... and likely it will be a necessity with my machine... maybe go to a 9 - 11ft log if it is needed.
    I guess I am a bit concerned about chaining directly to the 3ph, with the likely shifting of the log pressure. Am I being penny wise and pound foolish with wear and tear on the hydraulics... hauling logs... or are these rear hydraulics VERY strong... seals etc. I am new to tractors with only about 100 hours in the seat since I bought the used tractor, and that was mostly bush hogging....
    I hear you all when you say take it slow and you will know in the first 2-3 ft of hauling. Within limits it is reasonably powerful tractor, but beyond limits things happen fast. I will keep my hand on the pto lever for sure.
    I will try to haul when the ground is frozen.

    A reasonable concern for a new tractor owner. - You will not wear out your hydraulics. They will only do what they can do. There are pressure reliefs in your hydraulic system to protect it. I think the log will have less shock leverage if it moves when chained to the hitch than if chained out on the box blade. Being farther aways gives a longer lever arm.

    You are thinking things thru which is good. Handleing 10' or 12' logs makes it a much more reasonable job. Figure what lengths you need and cut to that as said above by Mike476. There will be less waste and it will be easier on you and the miller. You will need to be able to estimate board feet in a log. I would use the International 1/4" log rule.

    Another thing you might consider - and I dont know your woods or your plans for your woods so I am just throwing this out. But nothing says you have to use your biggest trees. You can actually improve the quality of you wood lot by taking out smaller, stunted, or ill-formed trees and leaving the nice big ones grow. It is like money in the bank. I would select a tree to cut based on how easy I can fell it in the open and get to it with my tractor.
    "If you're not making any mistakes then you're not doing anything"

    L3010DT, Farmi JL290 Winch, ATI Grapple, BearCat 5" Chipper, 6' Rear Blade,
    7' Sickle Bar, 5' Land Plane Grading Scraper, Dresser TD7G Dozer

  5. #25
    Platinum Member Army grunt's Avatar
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    Georga
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    TC 30 Newholland

    Default Re: hauling logs

    Are you cutting timber for fire wood, or saw timber?
    Army Grunt
    "Be who you are, say what you will, those that matter wont mind, those that mind don't matter".

  6. #26
    Bronze Member
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    Default Re: hauling logs

    In my expirience dragging logs through the dirt some of that dirt sticks to the log and then has a bad effect on the sharpness of my saw. Like it wont cut nuttin no more. I got an old retired manure spreader with a long box removed the beater and sold the apron chain for scrap. the old nurr spreader can hold alot of logs. they can stick way out the back no problem. Plus the low box is ideal. this one has nice steel sides and is very sturdy. Or if you have a old pickup truck and wide open spaces you can haul them crosswise on the box. Might wan to chain them down.

  7. #27
    Gold Member wcampbell47's Avatar
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    Texas Coast
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    Kubota 7510 and B3200

    Default Re: hauling logs

    Back in the day I skidded logs one summer to haul to the sawmill. I had a pair of log tongs much like ice tongs. Sharp points on the end dug into the log as I lifted or moved forward.

    Basically I could back up over the log, lower the 3 point and many times the tongs would catch without much ado. Occasionally had to get off the tractor.

    Lift and drive forward. Keep your foot ready to clutch the tractor or get off the propel pedal at the first indication of front end going airborne. Weight in the front end loader will keep the front down and the wheels engaged with the ground for better traction. You will be surprised at what you can move.
    Caution: Some of my posts may be politically incorrect.
    Kubota B7510 & B3200

  8. #28
    Elite Member Baby Grand's Avatar
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    Windsor, CT.
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    Kubotas: L3240GST B2320HST B5100D & G5200H

    Default Re: hauling logs

    Quote Originally Posted by Wyobuckaroo View Post
    <snip>
    I backed up tight to the log, and picked up the end with the chain hooked to the top of the arm the top link hooked to. Once off the ground, I chained the log up close to the draw bar. That is the chain on the top link arm only lifted, and the chain on the draw bar pulled.

    There was enough slack in the pulling chain that the log rode a few inches behind the draw bar so turning wasn't a problem. And yes, it was a little more time consuming to do hook ups and unhooks..........
    <snip>
    Quote Originally Posted by 300UGUY View Post
    I've yanked around some logs that size, I use my 3 pt boom pole. Using the hook point closest to the tractor. I don't lift the end of the log much, just a couple of inches, so that it is dragging, but not plowing. You will tear up the ground pretty good. I go slow, and keep the bucket low. I don't want to be field pizza.
    Quote Originally Posted by sparc View Post
    <snip>
    Ever seen a grasshopper? Used for moving lengths of pipe. Difference is it has a long arm on it about 12' and its placed near the center of the pipe (or log in this case) so its got all the load.

    Grasshopper

    <snip>
    Here's my hitch ala Wyobuckaroo & 300UGUY (sorry for the blurry image):

    -pc290033-jpg

    I'm working on modifying a $69 Harbor Freight quick hitch into a skidder. The boom pole works, but has it's limitations. It really needs an attachment point about where the two stays are welded for better lift strength and to get the weight closer to the rear axle to reduce front axle lifting. The stays interfere with the log and the bottom cross between the 3PH pins always seems to interfere with the chain to the drawbar.
    Working in the woods yesterday I made a real mess dragging this one log. I've been waiting for a good, hard freeze, but it's not here yet. I really need to make a log arch - or grasshopper - thanks for that link, sparc.
    That's the problem with trouble.
    It always starts out as such fun."
    - Randall Brown

  9. #29
    Elite Member
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    adirondacks

    Default Re: hauling logs

    I see what your up against and can write what I did. 1st off nothing worse then trying to mill logs that are full of dirt, sand, rocks. Tractor Supply has a "CountyLineŽ Carry All" that hooks to the 3pt hitch. I used my Jinma 254 to haul logs up to 12 foot long with this setup, key to doing it is make sure you have room and keep the load balanced. This worked quite well, I milled thousands of boardfeet this way. You'll have to learn what your machine is capable of handling. This setup works good for miiling because it keeps the weight close and the log out of the "mill dulling compounds". Your B3030 looks to be slightly bigger then my jinma was so you should be able to carry these logs {@9-11'} easily. The down side to this is the fact you'll need a path that is wider then the length of your log. You'll be carrying the log not dragging it. I also used a small strap once in awhile to help hold the load secure, this was not allways needed.

    If you have to drag just remember dirt is a pain when it's milling time{not miller time}. I have refused to mill logs before because of the way the guy pulled them out through a swamp. He didn't want to wait for me to come get the logs, so he took it upon himself to pull the logs out. I took one look at the logs and said "well,..... clean them 1st before they go on my mill" He said "never mind I'll find someone else" long story short NO ONE else would even touch the logs, now he has a nice big pile of compost.

  10. #30
    Veteran Member Mike476's Avatar
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    MF 135 Z134 Continental, MF 1660 Cab

    Default Re: hauling logs

    Another scale that I've used is the Doyle scale (link attached). Depending on what your milling and the aggressiveness of your blade you can better the scale by 20%.

    Doyle Log Scale portable sawmill williamsburg virginia

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