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  1. #11
    Gold Member
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    Kubota B3300SU

    Default Re: disc vs spring tooth harrow on plowed land

    Quote Originally Posted by tessiers View Post
    rototillers do a nice job as well but are harder on the soil,
    Could you explain?

  2. #12
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    Apr 2011
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    New Haven, Vermont
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    Kubota Grand L3540 Kubota BX2230 Land Pride FDR 2572 Land Pride LR1584 Woods BB 720X Kubota L3400HST /Kubota M7040 / Kubota BX2230

    Default Re: disc vs spring tooth harrow on plowed land

    I plow first with my Ford 101 - then use my JD 681 Roto-Tiller. When I am done we take a cultipacter next. Just a great job.
    David Pidgeon
    New Haven, Vermont

  3. #13
    Platinum Member tessiers's Avatar
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    Central Maine
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    05' JD 790 - 49' Ford 8n - 53' Ford NAA - 70' Massey Fergusen 135 diesel - 1950 John Deere MC - 1992 Thomas T-83 skid steer

    Default Re: disc vs spring tooth harrow on plowed land

    Rototillers work the soil excessively, causing it to break down into smaller pieces. Through wet dry cycles rototilled soil will compact much faster and harder than plowed and harrowed soil. The result is the need to work the soil more starting the process over. This is OK for a garden spot, because you rototill twice a year anyway. It also disrupts the microb's and bacteria in the soil. Plowing and harrowing works the soil less and is not as harsh, although no till is the best option for the soil. There is a lot of good info out there on the subject, I am by no means an expert.
    check us out at www.tessiersfarm.com

  4. #14
    Veteran Member D7E's Avatar
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    Default Re: disc vs spring tooth harrow on plowed land

    Quote Originally Posted by tessiers View Post
    Rototillers work the soil excessively, causing it to break down into smaller pieces. Through wet dry cycles rototilled soil will compact much faster and harder than plowed and harrowed soil. The result is the need to work the soil more starting the process over. This is OK for a garden spot, because you rototill twice a year anyway. It also disrupts the microb's and bacteria in the soil. Plowing and harrowing works the soil less and is not as harsh, although no till is the best option for the soil. There is a lot of good info out there on the subject, I am by no means an expert.
    It also makes soil wetter soil as overworked soil will not tolerate as much rain . Ocasional use realy is'nt going to make a difference though .

  5. #15
    Veteran Member D7E's Avatar
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    Default Re: disc vs spring tooth harrow on plowed land

    We try to work as little as possible in spring to avoid compacted wheel tracks and bringing up nasty lumps of clay . Chisel plough 4-6 inches deep twice in the fall in two directions then once over in spring with a tine harrow to warm and dry the soil whilst incorporating fertilizer ahead of the planter .
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -img_2547-jpg   -p1010026-jpg  

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