Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 70
  1. #31
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    381
    Location
    Florida Ma.
    Tractor
    Ford 1720 SSS 4x4

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    I built my splitter in 1976 and I didn’t have a tractor at the time.
    I built my splitter with a 10 hp cast iron engine and a 22gpm pump that will cycle the piston out and back in 7 seconds. The pump will build 2500 psi on a 4” cylinder. It has wheels and a trailer hitch for transport.
    30 years of use have use tell me it was a good build and rarely gets stuck.
    Fast forward to today; I still have the same splitter with no changes or repairs, still runs like the day I built it. I also have a FORD 1720 tractor with pallet forks that I use to move it with.
    It became very inconvenient to install the hitch just to move the splitter and I liked the idea of mounting it on the 3pt hitch but I also didn’t want to have to remove my forks so I modified the splitter so it accepts my pallet forks.
    When I want to split I back under it, pick it up and carry to the work site. With it on the forks I can place it right in the middle of the pile and just pick it up to move verses needing to dig it out so I can tow it to the next pile of wood. I also can adjust the height to save my back.
    My suggestion to you is buy or make a splitter that has its own power source and that is fast and powerful enough to make it pleasant to operate, waiting for the ram to reset is very aggravating.
    I would suggest a self powered splitter rather than running your tractor at PTO speed all day.
    That way someone can be splitting while the tractor is fetching more logs or you can throw the split wood into the bucket to eliminate handling.
    30 plus years; that’s my take on it!!
    90cummins

  2. #32
    Platinum Member adirondackmtnman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    841
    Location
    Black Brook, NY
    Tractor
    JD 5045D

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    Quote Originally Posted by vtsnowedin View Post
    I have a stand alone splitter that I can pull behind the 4wheeler or the tractor but spends most of it's time next to the wood pile. I like to bring blocks from wherever I bucked them up with the JD bucket and park close enough with the bucket waist high that I just swing the blocks over and let them drop a couple of inches onto the splitter beam. That saves a lot of lower back strain and I'm getting creaky enough to not want to accelerate the ageing process.
    Good idea...I've got the creaks too!!!
    "Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far." ~Theodore Roosevelt

  3. #33
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    245
    Tractor
    Oliver 1655

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    I started off with a piece of I-beam with 2 pieces of flat welded on one end with 3/4 holes for half a hing a wedge welded to the other end, an 8" length of 2" sq tubing which had a 5" piece of 3/4" pipe welded across the end of it that slid into the 3pt hitch mounted receiver for the other half of the hinge & a 4x24" cylinder mounted to the beam with the push plate which was powered by the tractor remote/valve.To raise the beam I would hook a short chain to the top of the receiver hitch where the center link connected and the push plate. When I extended the push plate it would lift the end of the beam off the ground.
    Pro: 1 - Less than $200 invested.
    2 - Very little time invested in fabrication.

    Con: 1 - Length of hoses did not allow the hydraulic fluid to circulate from the hoses/cylinder & caused heat build up.
    2 - Required someone to sit on the tractor to run the valve or you had to hook a stick to the valve to move it. If someone else was operating the valve you had to be very careful they made sure hands were clear before cycling the cylinder.
    3 - Too much bending over. I while I liked being able to roll large rounds onto the beam while it was on the ground, my back said to find a better option.
    4 - As many have said: higher fuel usage, wear on tractor, & it tied up the tractor.

    So --- I decided:
    1 - Once I picked the round up off the ground it would not hit the ground again until it hit the wood pile.
    2 - It would be a stand alone.
    3 - Have a log lift. No bending over to split!
    4 - Dedicated horizontal splitter. (Wedge welded to beam.)
    5 - Have out feed tables.
    6 - Use a single wedge. (Elm & hedge - Not good candidates for 4 way wedges.)
    7 - Be heavy & wide enough wheel base to pull a trailer with. (Carries the saws, gas/oil, accessories, & holds 1/2 cord of wood.)

    Built my own using the initial setup. Added an oil cooler with box fan to allow for splitting in 100 degree plus heat. Later added a wheeled hydraulic jack stand. (Makes hooking it up a snap!) The 2" coupler screws out and a pintle eye can be screwed in or just leave it without any hitch to deter theft/ borrowing.
    (The attached photos are before I moved the hydraulic oil filter to the suction side and added the wheeled hydraulic jack stand.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -img_1141-jpg   -img_1132-jpg  

  4. #34
    Super Star Member murphy1244's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    16,564
    Location
    Ohio
    Tractor
    Kioti DK 40-Massey ferguson 135-Ventrac 4500 Diesel

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    Oliver, That is the best splitter I've seen yet.
    Murph ------------

  5. #35
    Platinum Member spruce Deere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    706
    Location
    Northmost Idaho
    Tractor
    John Deere 790 w/ 300 loader

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    Oliver, that is one heck of a splitter!!!!
    790 JD W/ 300 loader
    Lots of implements for loader and 3pt
    Can't do it burn'n diesel, is not worth do'n

  6. #36
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    665
    Location
    Northern, NJ
    Tractor
    Kubota L45

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    Quote Originally Posted by John_Mc View Post
    Is that a pro or a con?
    YES, YES IT IS.

  7. #37
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    1,002
    Location
    Vermont
    Tractor
    NH TC33D

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    While we're on the subject of saving backs, these Timber Tongs (sometimes referred to s Lifting Tongs) are the best $35 I've spent on my firewood handling. You can pick up a round without bending down, using one hand. They release easily with a flick of the wrist. They are also helpful dragging longer logs around, or repositioning them for cutting.

    They make both 8" and 12" tongs. I use the 8", since they are compact and easy to carry in the woods. The 8" model will pick up most 10" diameter rounds, and a lot of the 12" logs I run in to (sometimes with a bit of "persuasion").
    -lifting-tong-png
    If the only tool you have is a hammer, you tend to see every problem as a nail.
    - Abraham Maslow

  8. #38
    Epic Contributor
    R.I.P.
    jinman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    21,014
    Location
    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    Quote Originally Posted by likeOwlNotCrow View Post
    hours on the tractor engine...it's basically just idling and pumping hydraulic, right? i have no plans to sell this one so not worried too much about resale value and running up the hours.
    I have a 3PH splitter on a 45 hp tractor with 9.8 gpm hydraulic flow. To get satisfactory power and speed to my splitter, I need to run the tractor at 2000 rpm or higher. That's much higher than idle. The tractor is good for my splitting because I only split about twice per year at most and don't heat my house with wood. If I split on a regular basis, I would not even consider the 3PH splitter in the long run. If you need an inexpensive splitter just to get by until you find a good stand-alone, then I'd say go with the 3PH one because they are much cheaper. You can resell the 3PH later or keep it as a standby. I just can't recommed one for anyone who splits a lot of wood or does it on a regular basis. You tie up your tractor, use more fuel, and put hours on the clock while having a much bigger area needed for the tractor to fit. All-in-all, the standalone would be my choice.
    Jim


  9. #39
    Epic Contributor
    R.I.P.
    jinman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    21,014
    Location
    Texas - Wise County - Sunset
    Tractor
    NHTC45D, NH LB75B, Ford Jubilee

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    Quote Originally Posted by spruce Deere View Post
    Oliver, that is one heck of a splitter!!!!
    That's no splitter. It's a firewood FACTORY! Wow! Tim the Tool Man would love that.
    Jim


  10. #40
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    7
    Location
    Amissville, Va
    Tractor
    John Deere 4400

    Default Re: 3-pt Hitch Log Splitter or Gas standalone?

    i just ran into town for some errands and picked up their last 12" timber tong for $39.99 at TSC. can't wait to use them - thanks for the tip!

Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 3PH log splitter or standalone?
    By tkappeler in forum Attachments
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 03-16-2013, 06:31 AM
  2. Gas or Electric Log Splitter?
    By pajoube in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 09-05-2011, 09:12 AM
  3. Electric motor (5HP) on gas log splitter?
    By jas67 in forum Hydraulics
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 08-03-2011, 01:53 PM
  4. Questions: gas powered log splitter hydraulics
    By atlkep1 in forum Hydraulics
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-22-2011, 08:29 PM
  5. Gas log splitter or 3PH?
    By Lineman North Florida in forum Attachments
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: 02-24-2010, 01:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.