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  1. #11
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    23,297
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: log splitter

    That's a good question.

    <font color=green> MossRoad </font color=green>

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    184
    Location
    Gig Harbor, WA.
    Tractor
    JD 4300HST 4x4

    Default Re: log splitter

    Kip
    On my jd4300 the engine will run just fine without anyone being in the seat. The only time the engine will shut down when pressure is released from the seat is when it's in gear or in my case when the hydro peddal is engaged. I can also run the pto without being in the seat. Just start it up, make sure the parking brake is set and pull the pto lever - round and round she goes.

    Jerry

  3. #13
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,665
    Location
    Cedartown, Ga and N. Ga mountains
    Tractor
    1998 Kubota B21, 2005 Kubota L39

    Default Re: log splitter

    Alex,

    I would agree with Roger and like the vertical splitters. I have a Bush Hog splitter that is horizontal and it does get old setting the logs if you are splitting a large amount of wood. Bush Hog no longer makes splitters and I picked mine up for under $400 from a dealer that was closing his doors. For the price I decided I could live with the horizontal unit.

    MarkV


  4. #14
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    63
    Location
    Hartland VT
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT-425 (new June 26, 2011)

    Default NorthernTools splitter

    I bought their splitter in Sept 2000 for my NH TC40D. Their catalog description is pathetic. It DOES include a control valve (though it doesn't have the auto-return when done feature), and so all you need are two hoses, a couple of 3/4" pipe elbows, and quick connectors (and any reducer couplings). Both hoses are 1/2" two-wire, with 3/4" male pipe fittings (got these from Northern Tools as well).

    For the past 7 years I have rented a towable splitter from the rental store, and because I was paying by the day, felt compelled to do all the splitting in one very long day (2 people slaving, unable to stand up the next day). Although not as fast as a dedicated splitter, I got the job done just fine, and was able to spread out the work....cut some, spit some, stack some, take a few days off, repeat.

    I split about 5 cords of mostly maple this year, spreading the work out over a two week period. This is the greatest benefit of owning your own splitter!

    Now, the details about the NorthernTools splitter:

    - It is very wide at the bottom of the 3-point hitch (~33" but 39" at the end of the lower pins), wider than any other implement I have, almost rubbing on my tires. So no rough-riding. You don't want to be pushing logs around in the woods with this thing attached! Plus it is kind of long, so you have to watch where you are going.
    - The vertical height of the 3-pt attachment seems wrong for a CAT-1 hitch. I have a hydraulic top link, which at its shortest length is about 1/2" longer than the standard top link. As a result, the splitter isn't level unless when at chest high. When I put the hitch down to the ground to load those huge logs, it has a 10 degree slant downwards. No big deal, and actually an advantage, as the weight of the log sliding against the wedge keeps the log in place. At normal splitting level, there is probably a 5 degree slant down. It wasn't worth swapping out my hydraulic top link to see if that would decrease the angle.
    -It is very powerful. The huge 24"+ base cuts didn't slow it down a bit. The rental units would choke at this point.
    -It is 1/3 slower than dedicated units. I attribute this to less gpm. Even the rental-type units turn out 14 or so gpm, and my tractor only 9.8 (in theory).
    -The control valve is very robust, so after about an hour, you get tired of pushing it back and forth. So I added an 18" copper pipe cheater bar which fixed that problem! Again, you have to push both ways, and because it is a bit slow, it seems to take forever (those arms are a bit rubbery after a while!).
    - I run it off of a second rear remote valve (the first being for the hydraulic top link), which is controlled by a center-open valve in the fender. Center open (as far as my limited knowledge and experience can determine) means that if you let it go, there is neither "in" or "out" pressure on the piston. It stays where you last put it by pushing the lever up or down. While a center-open valve works great for the top link, it doesn't work so well with the splitter, which has its own control valve. To solve that problem (don't tell anyone), I jam the seat belt end into the slot in the fender to keep the valve all the way open (works great!). That pushes the hydraulic pressure to the control valve on the splitter. The only downside is that to lower/raise the 3-pt hitch, I have to release the valve on the fender.
    -The 3-pt hitch doesn't go down far enough to attach it, so you need to raise it about 12-18". It is only 200 or so lbs, so I put it on a nursery cart and roll it around that way.
    -Keep the neighbors away...no borrowing! This is a very expensive log splitter to run when attached to an expensive tractor! 30-40 hp tractors with an attachment + loader rent for $250 to $325 per day, while a splitter alone rents for $75/day. And, of course, none of the other neighbors' tractors have rear-remotes, so it is useless to them.

    So the bottom line for me? It is a good long-term investment because I only split at most 6 cords per year (I cut the trees down myself), and seasoned cords go for about $130 around here. The rest of the time, it is idle. Frankly, I have enough other engines to worry about, so this is one less engine to maintain. Plus, it is small and easy to store. I like using the tractor's hydraulic supply as well (the PTO-driven splitter models have their own pump and tank). By the way, the splitter piston and hoses didn't drop the hydraulic level any noticeable level.

    If you are in the log-splitting business, then by all means, go for a better unit. But then you would also be looking at automatic feeders, cutters, etc., and be spending $50K. For the price and what I need it for, the NorthernTools splitter was a true value.

    <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by Kent on 12/14/01 01:56 PM (server time).</FONT></P>

  5. #15
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    990
    Location
    Winchester, New Hampshire
    Tractor
    Kubota L3000

    Default Re: log splitter

    I have heated my house totally by wood stove for the last 27 years, a few years before that I helped a friend put up his winter wood. I burn around 1000 cubic feet of wood, about 8 cord. My mother has a horizontal hydraulic wood splitter that I have used to split two winters worth of wood.

    This splitter sits very close to the ground, good for rolloing large pieces on but very hard on the back after 20 minutes for me. One solution was to build a platform and place the splitter on it so I could stand up straight, I also made a couple of catch shelves for the pieces that had the be split twice so I didn't have to bend over to pick up the once split piece.

    I prefer to split my wood with a mall, sometimes a problem piece gets started with the chainsaw. I will admit there are some pieces of wood that I just leave in the woods because they would not be worth the effort to try to split. Most times it is faster to split my wood by hand than if I used a splitter. I have learned to split for a while, pile for a while, maybe cut for a while and I can still get about 8 hours of work out of this 50 year old body.

    If Iwere to purchase a splitter it would be self powered so I could use the tractor to bring wood to it and take the wood away.

    Randy


  6. #16
    Veteran Member hayden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    1,709
    Location
    MA/VT
    Tractor
    Kubota L5740 cab + FEL, Cat D5G dozer, Kubota KX121 excavtor

    Default Re: NorthernTools splitter

    Excellent review - thanks. A number of us have been wondering about this splitter and nobody has been able to talk about it until now. THanks again.


  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    10
    Location
    Richardsvlle, VA
    Tractor
    TC29 & Agco Allis 5670

    Default Re: log splitter

    I have a model KLS 24XE log splitter from C.C. Kelley & Son. I have been running it lately off my remote hydralics on the TC29. It more than handles the splitter and is as fast as running off my larger tractor. It isn't that heavy and easy to hook to the 3pt. It is their economy model but I have used it split about 8-10 cords per year for heating the house.
    They come in both open and closed hydralic systems and in a larger size than mine. I split oak, cherry, and other hardwoods with no problem. Even the gnarly trunks and limbs give in to the splitter. They don't look pretty but burn very nicely.
    When the dealer installed the remote ($250), they put the little screwdown knob in that channel on the fender. So when I use the splitter, I push the remote handle all the way forward and hold it with the screwdown. The other hydralics don't work but I am stationary and don't need them.
    The cost as I remember was around 300-400 and from my backs perspective worth every dollar even tho I use it mostly in the fall.
    Bill


  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    336
    Location
    Summerside, OH
    Tractor
    NH TC33D; RTV900; Gravely Professional

    Default Re: NorthernTools splitter

    Kent--thanks very much. I've been on the fence re. one of these for a good while, and your information helps push me toward going ahead. Question for the board---does anybody have one of the newer TSC three-point splitters which has a stand and can switch from horizontal to vertical?

    Rick

  9. #19
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    562
    Location
    NC
    Tractor
    NH TC35D4

    Default Re: log splitter

    here's an option for you too, runs off the PTO.
    Looks like a good HD splitter.
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.timberwolfcorp.com/splitters>here</A>

    gary

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    415
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota B7100HST & Kubota L4610HST w/FEL

    Default Re: NorthernTools splitter

    rmorgan
    Have the Huskee 34 ton from TSC. 9hp gas engine, works great. I prefer seperate from tractor, use fel to bring in chunks and tote the split wood away.
    regards
    Mutt

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