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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    29
    Location
    pa
    Tractor
    NH 1520

    Default log splitter

    i have been thinking of getting a 3pt log splitter to run off the tractor hydraulics, any input about brands, also what is a closed center vs open center hydraulic valve, how would you tell the difference, my tractor has a loader and i had an aux valve installed on the tractor when i bought it. i have a NH 1520, but i cant figure this center deal out. any help would be appreciated.

    alex


  2. #2

    Default Re: log splitter

    Alex,
    I'm going to piggyback on your post, because I am also looking for a hydro log splitter. We can both benefit from the responses


  3. #3
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    126
    Location
    CA, Placer County
    Tractor
    1999 Kubota L4310 HST 4WD, R4 Tires, Folding ROPS, Kubota Canopy

    Default Re: log splitter

    Hi Alex,
    I have a new Gearmore 3PH log splitter that works well. Very heavy construction. I use mine on a L4310 kubota but any Catagory 1 3PH should work. I like the models that stand straight up verse horizontal so you can roll the heavy pieces onto the base. The horizontal models you have to lift the logs in place or use some sort of table. I have split about 4 cords so far. I paid ~$1300. Attached is a photo.

    The model I have has open center hydraulics in series with the loader and Tip-N-Tilt valves. On a open center system the Hydraulic fluid flows at the max GPM rate with no back pressure through the valve until you pull the control lever. When the lever is pulled, the oil is diverted to the cylinder making it move and creating pressure. Most Loaders work this way. If in doubt, ask your dealer. I paid $50 to have the neccessary quick couplers installed by the dealer. Hope this helps.

    -Roger

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -5-32049-gearmorelogsplitter2-jpg  

  4. #4
    Veteran Member hayden's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    1,709
    Location
    MA/VT
    Tractor
    Kubota L5740 cab + FEL, Cat D5G dozer, Kubota KX121 excavtor

    Default Re: log splitter

    Does anyone own one fo the Northern Hydraulic's 3PH splitters? They are $400, but I think don't include the control valve which woudl add $125 or so.


  5. #5
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    340
    Location
    Fairfax, Franklin County, Vermont
    Tractor
    1999 Cub Cadet 7260

    Default Re: log splitter

    RMulkey - Wow, I'm jealous! That must be the Harley Davidson of splitters (I'm making that Tim Allen sound)![img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img][img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img] I've never used a vertical splitter. Have you had experience on the horizontal kind as well? How do they compare? Is one harder on your back than the other? Is one safer than the other? Sorry for the questions, but I've been looking lately, and am interested in your perspectives. Thanks in advance.


  6. #6
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,444
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: log splitter

    I've used the horizontal kind, but if I ever bought one, it'd be the vertical type. Some of those logs get heavy to lift onto the horizontal ones.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/frown.gif[/img]

    Bird

  7. #7
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Posts
    126
    Location
    CA, Placer County
    Tractor
    1999 Kubota L4310 HST 4WD, R4 Tires, Folding ROPS, Kubota Canopy

    Default Re: log splitter

    Corm, I have used a horizontal splitter once. I do not consider myself a log splitter expert. I just own one. The problem I had with the horizontal splitter was you have to lift the big logs up on to the bed to get them on the splitter. When the log splits, you have to lift the large pieces up on to the bed again to split them again. I admit I am lazy and this got old. With the vertical splitter, you roll the log in place and split off a piece. Then rotate the log again and split some more. There are some splitters that have a 4 way spliter on the base, but the prices were about $2.5k and I could only find a horizontal model. I really don't know if there is any safety differences.
    Hope this helps.


  8. #8

    Default Re: log splitter

    The log splitter we have can swing between horizontal and vertical. This makes it the best of both worlds. For large logs we stand it vertical and just roll them into place saving the lifting. For smaller logs we have found that having it horizontal is easier since we are standing to run it instead of all that bending and squatting. Can normally catch the logs as they split to either split them again or toss into the truck.

    Of course, when we have lots of help, one person uses a log for a chair and sets there running the splitter. Someone else feeds them the log while someone else loads the splits.

    Ours is a tow-behind though not a 3pt.


  9. #9
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2000
    Posts
    10,079
    Location
    Triangle Of North Carolina
    Tractor
    JD 4700

    Default Re: log splitter

    I spent a summer working on a farm splitting farmwood hour after hour after hour bent over one of the horizontal splitters. I think its a device made for torture... 8-)

    One of my thoughts on using the tractor was to get a splitter that the JD could run. I'm having second thoughts about all this. For the last couple of years I have been splitting firewood as I need it with a simple splitt'n wedge on a stick. This seems to work real well. I only have to split a little at a time as I need wood. My father split roughly a third of a cord in an hour or so of work. I really think this wedge on a stick is faster on most logs than a log spliter. Logs that have a bend or fork can be a bit tougher.

    The problem with most log splitters is that the operator is bent over all the time and that is real hard on the back. I saw some sort of a timber tool, and I think it was a splitter, in the ad section of Small Sawmill and Woodlot magazine. What caught my eye was that the operator was not bent over.

    It kinda of hit me that I could use the FEL to load up a bunch of wood, I do this all the time anyway, and use it to hold the wood at a comfortable level. If the wood spillter was waist high then you could run the thing for along time without having to bend over except to pick up the splits. There just needed to be a way to keep the splitter at the right hight.

    Tain't figured that part out since I don't have a splitter and I think this part will be very splitter specific. I suppose you could build a bench to hold splitter and use the FEL to hoist it into place. Then use the FEL to bring in the logs.

    I noticed how easy it was to us the FEL to load the truck. I don't dump the wood in but stack it by hand. This is very easy with the FEL at just the right hight. Since I don't have to really lift UP there is very little work.

    If I ever get a log splitter I don't think I'll have one to hook up to the rear of the tractor.

    Just my thoughts....
    Dan McCarty


  10. #10
    Silver Member kiphorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    112
    Location
    Central PA
    Tractor
    TC 24D

    Default Re: log splitter

    I'll soon be purchasing my first tractor. One attachment that I was considering was a log splitter.

    If the tractor has one of those safety devices that shuts the tractor off when you get out of the seat [img]/w3tcompact/icons/frown.gif[/img] , how do you operate the splitter?

    I couldn't trust my 3 year old to sit in the seat. The power windows in the back of the car get a work out, I can't imagine what he'd do in the drivers seat of our tractor. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]

    Kip


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