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  1. #31
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Disk vs tiller revisited

    Alan,
    My neighbor has a 10 foot hydraulic disc for sale for $175. Around here they rarely go for alot more than that.



  2. #32
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    3,611
    Location
    Grayson County, TX
    Tractor
    Kubota B2710

    Default Re: Disk vs tiller revisited

    Wish I could find a similar deal. Maybe I just don't know where to look. Do the hydraulics hook up to the tractor? I don't think I've got a place to plug into on my 2710, plus unfortunately my little tractor might not be able to budge a 10 footer.

    Alan L., TX

  3. #33
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Disk vs tiller revisited

    Yes the hydraulics hook up to the tractor. Those discs like you are talking about from KK though go really cheap at the farm sales that I've been to, like $100.


  4. #34
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    1,573
    Location
    Waco, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910; Kubota T1670

    Default Re: Disk vs tiller revisited

    Alan,

    My dad had a Ford 1100 for about 20 years and serviced about a 1 acre garden with it. Actually, I did most of the work 'cause I thought it was COOL,[img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img] and it was! It had 11 drawbar hp (4wd) and it pulled a single bottom plow and a 4 foot disk. We weighted the disk with a large piece of railroad steel that must have weighed 200 lbs, don't know, because I wasn't big enough to take it off. Changing the angle of the top link caused it to cut more or less, and also allowed you to throw dirt to the center to make terraces to control erosion. Call it a "toy" disk if you like, but it busted up the soil fine enough to use a walk-behind planter. But folks are right, the soil moisture is very important, too wet and it clumps between the disk's blades. To dry and you have to make umpteen passes to break up the clods. Just a matter of experience. If I were in your shoes and were buying new, I would go for the tiller, given the small price difference you are seeing. But if I could get a used plow and disk for cheap, I know they would do fine. I second Bird's opinion that you would need to plow it first, and you would not be happy with the results from just disking.

    Also, one more thing. If the plow and/or disk you buy is severely pitted from rust, it will not sluff the dirt very well and you will be unhappy. Plows and disks require periodic washing and coating with a rust inhibiter, in my experience. We always used old motor oil. Maybe a tiller wouldn't be as bad about that.


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