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  1. #1
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    Default Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    Can anybody clearly explain the difference between a rollover box scraper and a "standard" box scraper....Does anybody have any experience with a rollover type? Why are they better than the standard ones. They seems to be quite a bit more money.

    Also on the box scraper topic: What are the benefits of a floating tailgate on a standard box scraper and is it a worthy addition?

  2. #2
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    Jim, you might read this thread and this thread for prior discussions on this topic.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    Bird,

    Thanks. I will read both. I should have searched before posting.

    Jim

  4. #4
    Gold Member gabby's Avatar
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    Default Re: Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    Jim,

    Rollover blades are much beefier than a typical box blade, and much more useful too.

    The reverse blade position is very good for "back-blading" to dress off fresh dirt or gravel. You drive forward with the blade in the reverse position so it floats and feathers out the dirt or gravel without you having to be a hydraulic magician.

    I have used the rippers for many things including ripping out old wire fences, roots, small stumps, etc. When you're finished ripping you just trip the lever and roll over to the forward or reverse blade position without leaving the seat.

    It acts like a box scraper in reverse if you have enough tractor to push it. FWD makes a big difference in reverse pushing. The wings keep the dirt from spilling out the sides.

    In forward blade position it also acts just like a box scraper.

    The additional weight vs. a box blade improves its bite, although in hard ground you won't get any bite without ripping first.

    I know it's a cost vs. features tradeoff but you'll do more work quicker with a rollover blade.
    Gabby

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    Jim,

    I think part of the controversy surrounding box blades on this board stems from what we are each trying to do with them. This post reflects my own experience, observations, and conclusions, right or wrong. I’m sure they conflict with other’s.

    If you have hard packed dirt to move, you need the box blade to act as a true cutting instrument. If spreading gravel or fluffy dirt is the task, a box blade acting merely as a pushing/smearing device is adequate.

    For true cutting, the fixed front blade/fixed rear blade style of box blade is an awkward compromise unless you are willing to manually or hydraulically adjust the top link with each reversal of direction. Either way, you need to get the leading blade much lower than the following blade. My former box blade with 2 fixed blades, when leveled from front to back, had the front blade slightly lower than the rear blade. That seemed right since most use is forward and the front blade will dominate the rear. Going forward in hard clay, the front blade would penetrate and cut aggressively for a short distance until the rear blade started dragging. At that point, the box blade just skated along without picking up much more dirt. In reverse it was worse. The rear blade being higher, never had a chance to penetrate. Instead, the lower, front blade dragged and smeared, leaving the higher, rear blade to only push loose stuff. Eventually the box blade would slide up out of the bite. I had no hydraulic top link to get the secondary blade out of the way and manual adjustment was impractical.

    The other disadvantage to double fixed blades is the dead volume between the blades. When that volume packs with dirt, pushing and smearing is about all you can do since the cutter clearance is gone. Its not obvious what is happening unless you get down on your hands and knees. Its tough to scrape that dirt out since 2 sets of blade retaining bolts protrude into that dead volume. I think this is a problem with or without top link adjustment.

    A roll-over blade addresses these issues by only having one (double edged) blade. It can be rolled over to provide a single blade oriented to cut in the opposite direction. No tag-along secondary blade to interfere with the primary blade. No dead volume between two blades to clog up. A bonus is an intermediate position for “scarfiers only” operation. Expensive and you still have to throw a lever with each reversal of direction unless you buy an even more expensive hydraulically actuated lever.

    The option I ended up with is the fixed front blade/hinged rear blade. The way it seems to work is going forward, the front blade is low and the rear blade hinges up as required to keep from interfering with the front blade penetration. Going backward, the hinged blade bottoms out at a lower level than the front blade so that the front blade does not interfere with the rear blade penetration. Also there is no rigid dead volume between the blades to pack up with dirt. And, all this happens automatically when reversing direction-no operator effort required.

    I'm not up to speed yet with this hinged blade but my first impression with finish grading is that it penetrates in reverse so well that you can easily take off more than necessary. That’s quite a contrast from my old blade/technique and will take some getting used to. Its also heavier, on a different tractor, and there is a hydraulic top link too. At this point I can't say for sure why its better than the old one, only this it is definitely much better.

    John

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    Gents,

    Thank you for your input. Do you have any comments on Woods vs. Landpride RO units?

    I need it for a road I'm building in reasonable soils, so it's not that much when you consider the alternative (paying somebody else to do it).

    Jim

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    So it would seem that the order of preference would be:

    1st Roll over blade

    2nd Fixed front blade, hinged rear blade

    3rd Both front and rear blade fixed.

    Of course this list also is most $$, more $$, and $$! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif[/img]




  8. #8
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    Default Re: Rollover Box Scraper / Floating Tailgate

    Gabby,

    I was quoted $1900.00 for the 77" Woods and $1600.00 for the 72" Woods. Land Pride no longer makes a rollover model. Too bad they are so darn much money. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img]

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