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  1. #11
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    588
    Location
    Augusta, AR
    Tractor
    05 CASE IH D35 W/FEL

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    The Howse rotary cutter that I bought did not have the chains that you mentioned. The shield turns with the pto shaft . If you get against it or grab it it stops turning instantly though. It has the 3 tabs that were mentioned to connect the bells. it does not have bearins only a plastic ring that runs in a machined grove on the pto shaft. It the shield were chained so that it could not spin with the shaft it would most likely only last about 1 hour

    jim

  2. #12
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    I was thinking about trying the idea of trying to install an eyelet through one of those plastic gussets near the end of the shafts. I'll keep you posted on the fix. Will likely work on it later this week. Lawn needs mowing first. Thanks for the help

    Derek

  3. #13
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    Jim

    I did try to stop the shaft will it was spinning freely. I did use a stick first! Then tried it with my hand. It does not take much effort at all to keep the shield stationary (not turning). The reasoning for my original question. I thought the chain was to keep the pto shaft from pulling apart after you remove the implement. I still need to find out if I have bearings or plastic ring running in a machined grove.

    Derek

  4. #14
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    Glen

    My pto shaft says made in Italy too. I basically hooked up the chain as you describe but must not of left enough slack for lifting the chipper up as high as I did [img]/w3tcompact/icons/frown.gif[/img]. I have noticed the three tabs too. I run it to stuff like that in my automotive work, yes it is a real pain!

    Which Valby chipper do you have? Do you have the hydraulic feed?

    Derek

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    281
    Location
    Fredericksburg, TX
    Tractor
    John Deere Model 670

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    Rowski - I have the Model 140; in other words, the stripped-down, direct-drive model. I recently completed a project that took over 80 hours to complete, so I have some experience with it. I like the chipper. It's heavy duty and works well with my little tractor (16.5 PTO). The manual feed obviously is more labor intensive, but it also allows me to easily control the rate of input. The only problem (and it's a significant one) is that juniper needles, small vines or leaves will quickly clog up the machine--especially if they are damp and decomposing. It's really frustrating to have to stop the tractor, open up the shroud and remove the gob of vegetation that is blocking the output chute. I have never seen a Model 160 in use, but I suspect that the greater speed of the disk eliminates some if not all of this problem. Before purchasing my Valby, I considered a BearCat. It was interesting to read a posting recently in which a BearCat owner mentioned that his machine clogged easily, too, even though it had the separate belted impeller, so I guess that some problems are universal. Chipping brush is not one of my favorite pastimes; however, I treasure the mulch as if it were gold. I spread it on areas that are bare or eroding and it is wonderful. It stays in place well, slows down or stops further erosion, keeps the soil cool and moist, and allows vegetation to get a foothold. It's perfect for our caliche hills here in central Texas. I do wish that I could have seen a Model 160 in action before I had to make a decision.




  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    94
    Location
    Western New Hampshire, Conn. River Valley
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 Hydro, Turf Tires

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    Rowski,

    All of the PTO Covers I've seen have the Plastic bearing into a metal groove. Not all bearings have balls! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/blush.gif[/img]

    With reasonable lubrication, it should still last pretty well - after all, there's not a big weight load on the bearing, just the weight of the plastic PTO shaft cover. I throw grease at mine occasionally, they continue to run without screaming... [img]/w3tcompact/icons/cool.gif[/img]

    and BTW, I have a BearCat 70554 Chipper/Shredder. I finally got to do some serious chipping with it this weekend - it's the proper monster! It had no problem eating everything I put into it, although it did spit out a few pieces - it apparently didn't like the taste! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img] Threw 'em back in though, and it choked them right down. Sure does make nice mulching material. Mine does NOT have a hydraulic feed, but the design of the chipper helps to self-feed. I was very happy that we didn't have to stand there and keep pushing the limbs into it - I'm very pleased with it. In the end, we pays our moneys, and takes our chances - nice to have it work out well. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]


    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PTO shaft Shielding-5-46682-image009.jpg  

  7. #17
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
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    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    <font color=blue>Not all bearings have balls!</font color=blue>

    That's for sure! But I think technically if they don't have balls then the are considered bushings.

    The Vably works well too. I love the hydraulic feed. If I'm working by my self, I can throw smaller limbs in the hopper and in they go! Here's a pic..

    Where about are you in Western NH?



    Derek <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by rowski on 05/23/01 01:09 PM (server time).</FONT></P>

  8. #18
    Veteran Member Rowski's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,478
    Location
    North Central Vermont, Jay Peak Area
    Tractor
    2004 New Holland TN70DA with 32LC loader, 2000 New Holland 2120 with Curtis cab, 7309 loader

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding


    Glen

    Fixed up the shielding the other night. Used a small eyelet, drilled a hole right next to the original hole, tightened it up and put some J-B Quick Weld on the threads. Worked great!

    One thing I did notice with the tabs to get the PTO shielding off is to insert a small thin screwdriver in the little slot on the black tabs. Just put a little pressure (like you would to pull it apart) and pry the lip down one at a time. Hopefully your's is like mine. Also I noticed that on one of those plastic tabs has a hole. It seems to me like a needle fitting on a grease gun end fits into this hole and lube the sheild bushing (one on each end). Take care. Happy Chipping!!

    Derek

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Posts
    3,371
    Location
    California - S.F. East Bay & Sierra foothills
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT Standard Transmission

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    Jim -

    I have the Howse rotary cutter, too. I have been following this thread very closely 'cuz I hadn't had a chance to use the cutter yet. Unfortunately, my tractor and cutter live over a hundred miles from me, so I had to wait until this weekend to see what y'all were talking about.

    Now that I've actually seen it again, hooked it up and used it, I can only add the following questions:

    What chains?
    What eyes?
    What ears?
    What tabs?

    My shaft cover is as smooth as a baby's bottom all the way around the end flanges. No sign of a chain nor any way to attach them if I had them. Like you say, the shield is free to rotate independently of the shaft, but I saw little choice but to let 'em both spin as much as they want.

    I've attached picts of my setup. Am I missing something? Not all PTO shields are created equal?

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PTO shaft Shielding-5-47454-ptoshaft.jpg  

  10. #20
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Mar 2000
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    36,981
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: PTO shaft Shielding

    Yep, Harv, I think most of them have a little chain, and a place it's hooked into the shield on each end and you attach the other end of each chain to the implement or 3-point so the shield doesn't turn, but I, too, noticed that the Howse comes without the chains, or a place to hook them. As long as you check it periodically to see that it will turn easily, independently of the driveshaft, I don't see that it makes a big difference.

    Bird

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