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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,390
    Location
    South Central Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4610HSTC

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    I forgot to mention: My neighbor (the really good one not the jerk) had two tractors go down on the 4th. I couldn't get any sympathy from him. He too got a flat while brush hogging and on tractor two a failed tie rod end. Of his three, the newest is over 30 yrs old.

    It must be something about working on a holiday. WE GOT TO QUIT THAT!!!

    Patrick


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,390
    Location
    South Central Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4610HSTC

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    Thanks for the additional comments, Matthew. I was aware of the nature of CaCl but assumed (and you know what that does) that there must be a coating inside the wheel for that. I will be leaving in 5 min to go to dealer. we will discuss this, you betcha. This is the first and only tractor I have ever driven. They treat me like I knew something, they shouldn't. Every little bit I learn is a big percentage of the total 'cause the total is so small.

    Patrick


  3. #13

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    128
    Location
    Central Massachusetts
    Tractor
    JD 870

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    It's not like you have much of a choice when you have a "real" job. I swear that I'd die if I didn't have a "real" job to go to so I can rest up from the weekends[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    So that would be four tractors down on the Fourth: his two, yours and mine.

    Matthew


  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    128
    Location
    Central Massachusetts
    Tractor
    JD 870

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    FWIW, I've discussed loading the tires on my tractor with my service dealer. His attitude has been to give everything a try before loading the tires. He says that if I can do everything I need to do without loading, then I'm ahead of the game. I've been following his advice and haven't found reason to doubt him.

    He says the same thing about chains in the snow. He figures that my oversized turf tires, snowblower and MFWD should be able to handle everything but ice. My experience is that _nothing_ handles ice.

    Matthew


  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,390
    Location
    South Central Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4610HSTC

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    Matthew, et al, We just got back from the kubota dealer where we discovered the parts that came in are the wrong thing. Seems two Kubota guys didn't really understand what I wanted but ordered what Kubota had, so it was the tractor side of the quick disconnect coupler for the FEL rather than the bucket/fork lift blade side (which is apparently not sold by Kubota).

    Anyway, we discussed the most experienced guys knowledge of brush hogging, tire punctures, liquid in tires, tire weights, 3pt weights, etc. Seems that Kevin of Chaprell Dodge/Kubota in Ada, OK financed a good part of his college education by contract brush hogging ( with a 21 ft brush hog with 3 blades) He got paid by the acre + client paid for tire repair. He's been there done that.

    He says that with good paint intact inside the wheels that corrosion is not a problem. Putting liquid in tubes is not a problem. If you want to be super careful you can coat the inside of the wheels with the DIY Rhino Lining stuff. You can get into trouble with anti-freeze (enviro hazzard), local tire shop has been forbidden to handle tires with liquid fill inside the city limits, and it is expensive and a hassle if you get a puncture. He says wheel weights do the same thing with no enviro hazzard and a 3ph counter weight is a fine thing as well, maybe a couple, one near your 3ph weight limit and one 1/2 to 2/3 of that if you want something lighter for less demanding jobs. He cautions that you should not extend the 3ph points of the weight to the rear but have the CG of the weight as close to the back of the tractor as is practical.

    He mentioned the reason tires began to be filled in the first place was 2 wd farm tractors pulling plows. They needed more traction not a counter weight. Wheel weights are more for traction than a counter weight but give fair counter weight action. 3ph weight is a counter weight with a bit better leverage than wheel weights or liquid fill and can be a DIY project much cheaper than buying wheel weights. He sells wheel weights but just told me the info that indicated that they were not a good choice for my application. I like it when I find good honest folk.

    He said that in agricultural applications he has seen tires in use down to 2 ply and that if he himself were upgrading from 6 ply it wouldn't be to 8 ply but 10 or 12. He concurs that the inserts with tubes (no problem adding tubes to tubeless tires) will stop tread punctures but that in brush hogging ahout 10% or so of punctures are in the side wall and not prevented by inserts. Foam fill doesn't care where the tire is punctured. In discussing the economics he pointed out that his dad's 100+ hp PTO tractor has over 3000 hours on the original tires which have about 25% of tread left but that it rarely sees pavement mostly just dirt, sand, and gravel.

    Given the likely life of my tires, perhaps I need to readdress this issue with my budget analyst. Even $1500 over 3000 hours is only $0.50 per hour for essentially complete flat protection. AAA roadside service were it available for tractors would still entail delays, inconvenience, and being stranded a good walk from civilization in the heat and bugs. Gotta give this some thought.

    About traction on ice. You can put ice studs, not the passenger car tungsten studs but the ice pick looking studs used in ice racing on your tires and get better traction than you would get on dry pavement. Probably would require tubes and the inserts to protect tubes from back side of studs.

    And finally, whew... Encouraging recycling versus litering. I get a lot of no deposit no return beer bottles
    A N D a lot of paper and styrofoam containers, thanks to the convenience stores about a mile to a mile and a quarter away. I wish I could positively ID the source, I'd give them back. Considering roadside video surveillance coupled with phone calls from a cooperative sherrifs deputy. One of my least favorite things in these parts is litter and it isn't just beverage containers but includes couches, refrigerators, and on and on. So far not along my hwy frontage but nearby in several locations. Still think a bounty on literrers is a viable approach.

    Patrick



  6. #16

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    128
    Location
    Central Massachusetts
    Tractor
    JD 870

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    Wow, thanks for the extensive treatise. I didn't know about the studs for tires, but I would imagine that getting them would put me into having a winter set of tires as well as the turfs. Chains would be cheaper, but ...

    There is one more point on the foam filled tires. They can't be removed with tire irons. When the time comes to get new tread, you can either have them retreaded on the rims (if retreading is affordable in your area and the carcass is safe) or you have to have the old tire cut off the rims, which adds to the expense. Retreading isn't really an issue for me as I expect that dry rot will claim the tires before tread wear does. That's what happened on my Cub Cadet 147. After 28 years the factory tires turned into air filters. They still had about 60% tread.

    I've used both my backhoe and box blade as counterweights for the FEL. On my steep slopes, the backhoe is too much as the tractor tends to want to get the front wheels off the ground when starting upslope with an empty bucket. The boxblade isn't enough when trying to dump a full load downslope. The tractor stays safe, but the bouncing is disconcerting, at best. Adding weight to the front tires is appealing as I've had things hanging from the backhoe that have lifted the fronts off the ground (see attachment). That's the granit billet that caused me to get the flat. The front tires are just touching as the backhoe had relaxed enough to touch the ground as well. The door I placed it in front of is the one in the photo.

    One of the reasons I was looking at filling my tires was for side to side stability on my slopes. CaCL+H2O fill lowers the CG of the whole system because the tops of the tires are filled with air. What I've been finding is that my pucker factor tolerance is far more sensitive than a tiltmeter[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]. I've been really unhappy in situations in which the tractor was quite stable.

    AS far as littering goes, I live in a very small town (2300) which has no convenience store, grocery store, pizza shop etc, but my parcel is within two house lots (450 feet) of the town transfer station (use to be a dump). For the last two years the bridge on the other side of the transfer station has been out so all of the traffic headed there went by my house. You can imagine what I've found on the side of the road. The bridge is open now and most of the traffic uses that approach so things have gotten better for me and worse for my further neighbors.

    Matthew

    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,390
    Location
    South Central Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4610HSTC

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    Matthew,

    We have had the "rot off before wearing out" problem on many wheeled vehicles incl Mercedes sedans, dune bugies, motorhomes etc. I have regroovable 19.5 Michelins on my Ram 3500. 50,000 on them and if wear were linear (it isn't) they'd go well over 250,000. I unfortunately expect them to rot off before being regrooved for additional miles. At least with foam, sidewall crazing from age-ozone near the rim won't leak air.

    Dry rot: Forget Armorall and 303 protectant. Check with Camping World. They sold (I bought) sun guard stuff for tires. Comes in can like brush on paint. Really protects against UV and ozone. Don't know if they still sell it. Wasn't cheap but seems to be working. Worth it if your tires are expensive but rot before they wear out.

    The heaviest and longest implement I have is a super HD 6 ft brush hog. It barely kept me from taking a nose dive on level ground unloading 200 6 ft T posts. I SHALL make a 3ph counterweight like the guy posted pix of in the projects section.

    3ph counterweight has better leverage so is better counterweight for FEL even with less pounds and the CG can be even lower than a 75% or even less fill.

    Patrick


  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    128
    Location
    Central Massachusetts
    Tractor
    JD 870

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    <font color=blue> you can coat the inside of the wheels with the DIY Rhino Lining stuff.</font color=blue>

    I'll have to call my local Rhino Lining dealer. I had no idea they had a DIY product. I've been thinking of taking my snowblower chute down and having the inside sprayed. Can they put down a smooth finish? (or more importantly, can I?).

    Matthew


  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Posts
    1,390
    Location
    South Central Oklahoma
    Tractor
    Kubota Grand L4610HSTC

    Default Re: L4610 with a wounded paw.

    W H O A, Easy there big fella, I'm sorry, I meant "rhino lining" as in facial tissue NOT "Rhino Lining" as in Kleenex. I meant some generic Rhino Lining like product. The diy product isn't Rhino Lining brand as far as I know. Don't know about using this stuff in an appliaction where you want Teflon (there I go again) like smoothness. I've never seen a bed liner that was intended (or wanted to be smooth). The makers/applicators brag on the non skid traction their products provide.

    I suppose you want the snow to slide off easily and not stick. You need something else I think. Powder coat can be quite smooth and durable. Powder coating is also available as diy equipment and supplies but you need an oven or other means of baking it on and your part might not fit in a regular oven. Some guys buy a used range or oven for little to nothing just to bake powder coatings.

    Maybe a good epoxy paint job carefully applied would be the most cost effective diy SLICK coating. After it is well cured and between uses, wax the surface.

    Anybody? What is a cheap, durable, and really slick coating to use with snow?

    Patrick


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