Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    111

    Default What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    Ok Here is the delema, I put in a garage 2 years ago and now it's time to fix my yard. As you can see from the pics I have a spot at the corner of the garage that is real high and I need to take it down to control run off. I have a 2210 with a 54 blade and you can see the results after about 2.5 hours. Not bad but considering that it was all mud and all I did was move it over but it's not great. I have very hard clay soil and my blade will not get into it. My budget is limited at the time so my choices are box blade with rippers or just the soil ripper/ sub soiler thing and use the blade to smooth things out. I need some specific answers to guide me on this one. 1. Will I be able to take off layers with a box blade effectively? I don't care if its 1 inch at a time just as long as there is progress. 2. How wide of a box blade can the deere 2210 with turfs pull? I'm thinking only 4 foot because I want to dig with it. 3 Can a box blade be put on so the teeth face back and use it in reverse? I read some where that if you really want to get the rippers working that would do it. 4. Is this a realistic project for my machine and a box blade? I don't want to buy it then find out I need to rent a tiller or something to loosen up this clay. I hear alot about these box blades being able to dig but I cannot find any pics of one in action. 5 How far in the soil will the rippers go? I would only need about 3 inches in penetration for it to be real effective for my use. Thanks for the help and let the opinions fly. Yard Photos - double click on picture for larger view.

  2. #2
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    1,683
    Location
    Northeast MA
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200 with BH77 backhoe, Kubota B50 SSQA w/ 54" & 60" buckets, LandPride FDR1660

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    Your tractor seems to be somewhat mis-equipped for this particular job. Probably your best investment at the moment if you want to move a lot of dirt would be a set of bar tires and a box blade. If you had the money for a FEL with a toothbar that would also work. But using the box blade to move the larger quantities of dirt then using the front blade to smooth things over later would work too. The reason why I mention bar tires is because you will get much better traction than with the turfs you currently have and be able to get more work done. If that is over your budget chains might help some and would probably be cheaper than a set of tires.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member cmhyland's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    638
    Location
    Woodstock Valley, CT
    Tractor
    2000 Kubota B2910

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    Hire a bulldozer and do the finish work with your machine...

    You need to have a lot of material removed and taken away or moved to another location on your property. It will take a dozer an afternoon to cut and regrade this... It could take weeks or months with your machine....

    Will the wife be willing to live with the excess dirt tracked into the house for that long?

    Regards,
    Chris

  4. #4
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    111

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    I can get chains. I want to keep the turfs because after this is done I want very little damage to the yard. I had some mudlites on my atv this winter and they look similar to a bar tire but everywhere I went on the trail was real obvious. Chunks of mud and grass everywhere. I sold them and bought ATR's, they are an all terain radial that is more like a agressive turf tire. I had no issues in the snow this year with the blower but they wouldn't hurt. Thanks for the heads up.
    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  5. #5

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    First, I'd like to suggest you go back and edit your large photos to a resolution of 620 x 480. Your file size is 1254.1 KB (1284201 bytes) which, even with broadband, took me a few minutes to view. Someone with dialup would take forever!
    You can alter the Dots Per Inch (DPI) to somewhere around 60 DPI, and that should do it as well.
    A boxblade will do what you want done. You'll have a much harder time doing it in reverse, although you could technically do it, but your tractor is designed, and hitch is designed for pulling that implement. You can turn most rippers around, set the top link so the rear blade doesn't hit, but that would be counter productive. You want the rippers to break up some dirt, and the blade to grab it up and haul it off, so go forward.
    3" should be no problem at all to take off in short order.
    Set the rippers to the second hole first, drop the box on the ground and set the top link so that the rippers will be digging in, and the inside rear blade will follow and gather soil.
    If that's not deep enough, set the rippers to the top hole, ripper all the way down, and try again.
    It may take a little experimentation to get the rippers and blade just where you want them, but not much.
    A 4' box is all that I'd use on that model tractor. Rippers "can" be difficult to pull through some soils, and roots will often stop you if you're trying to grab too wide an area, so I would not go wider than that.
    John

  6. #6
    Super Member Bob_Skurka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    7,503

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    I think Jim Wilson's recommendations make a lot of sense. If you can't spring for the bar tires, consider a less expensive alternative and put snow chains on all 4 tires. The 2210 is going to be giving it everything it has to use a 4' box blade, especially if you have the scarifiers down. I usually push for lighter tractors for lawn use, but in this case, I'll concede that a heavy tractor for traction is a better choice, as you don't have that, you might want to consider the new set of tires or snow chains. Also consider fluid filling all 4 tires (you can always drain the fluid when you no longer need it).

    As for some of the other questions, the rippers will only dig down a couple inches, they are basically used to loosen the soil so the rear blade can scrape the soil and collect it for redistribution elsewhere. If you tilt the blade forward so the rear of the blade is tilted up, the blades will give you slightly more bite and the blade won't collect as much dirt, making several passes just ripping with the scarifiers will looses the clay soil's top layer and then you can go back with the blade level so you can pull the soil to the area where you need it. It will take a bit of time, but depending on your soil conditions you might find it works better than trying to scarify and move soil in one pass.

    I am NOT the most expienced Box Blader here, but I find pulling a blade more effective, then again, I never tried pushing the box with the scarifier teeth set backwards. Something about that just sounds wrong. The blade really needs the teeth to break up the compacted soil before it can move it, with the teeth behind the blade I think it would be ineffective, but like I said, I never tried that.


  7. #7
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    955
    Location
    Jasper, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota B7510HSD

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    NOTE: All my comments below about straight blades are about a blade mounted on the rear of a tractor. I have no experience with a front mounted blade like you show in the picture.

    A box blade is much heavier than a straight blade, my 4' Howse BB weighs in at 400 pounds while my 6' straight tilting blade is 263 pounds, quite a difference. From the looks of your blade it probably weighs 200 pounds or so.

    >I have very hard clay soil and my blade will not get into it.

    I had a blade that I bolted 2 V8 engine heads to for added weight. I was using it to keep a road graded and the extra weight made a huge difference. Bolted them no the backside of the blade with allthread rod.

    The angle of the blade makes a big difference. The more tilt (top away from the tractor, bottom nearer the tractor on a rear mounted blade, in your case the top would be nearer the tractor) you have the deeper it will dig. Takes some experimenting to get it where you want it.

    >1. Will I be able to take off layers with a box blade effectively?

    Yes, it may only be 1" but a 1" layer 4' wide is a lot of dirt. If the BB is 16" high you would theoretically fill the box in 16' of travel. In reality, you will probably be able to pull 20' or so before the box fills up. You will learn to use the 3PH lift to regulate the depth of cut.

    >2. How wide of a box blade can the deere 2210 with turfs pull? I'm thinking only 4 foot because I want to dig with it.

    I have pulled a 4' box blade with a Ford 8N (26 HP gas engine), a kubota B7100 (16HP diesel), and now a Kubota B7510 (21HP diesel) and it worked OK with all of the above tractors. With your 23 HP diesel you should be fine.

    >3 Can a box blade be put on so the teeth face back and use it in reverse?

    I have never tried that but it would put a horrible amount of stress on the 3PH linkage. Personally, I would never try it.

    You can use the box blade in reverse to push dirt with but it is much less effective than pulling.

    The rippers on a box blade usually have 3 positions, up out of the way, part way down, and all the way down. I have a similar project at the corner of my garage and have used the box blade to move more dirt than you will have to move. I keep the teeth at the mid position. At that position they are about 1" below the bottom of the box blade. Depending on the angle I set the BB at they can dig 3" or 4" deep (with the BB tilted forward) or I can tilt the BB backward and the teeth are just above the ground. With the BB level the rippers tear up just about the right amount of soil (1") for removing in one pass.

    >4. Is this a realistic project for my machine and a box blade?

    Sounds like a perfect project for a BB. I have a FEL but use the BB for work like this. The FEL is nice for backdragging (smoothing) the dirt but the BB can do the same job very nicely with a little practice.

    >I don't want to buy it then find out I need to rent a tiller or something to loosen up this clay.

    I suspect a tiller might just get clay balled up in it if the clay is wet. I doubt it would be very useful in heavy clay. Please note that I am talking about really sticky clay like I have, if yours has a lot of sand mixed in it a tiller might work but I would not bother, the BB will work better.

    >5 How far in the soil will the rippers go? I would only need about 3 inches in penetration for it to be real effective for my use.

    They should go about 3" into the soil but I doubt that you will need that much. If you are ripping 3" deep the BB will fill up in just a few feet.

    I have many hours in with both a straight blade and a box blade. If I could have only one, I would choose the box blade.

    My comments are also based on the fact that I am in no hurry. If I wanted it done with a week I would hire a dozer but I enjoy my seat time so I will keep plugging away to my projects. If I got it all done in a month what would I do for a hobby?

    Sorry this is so long but you wanted specifics so I have tried to give you as much information as possible.

    Bill Tolle

  8. #8
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    111

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    Thanks btolle, That was the kind of info I was looking for. I have alot of time and I like doing things myself. I just hate paying someone to excavate and then not do it the way I want. If it takes me 100 hours that's OK. I will look into chains and loading the front tires. The back ones are already loaded. You are right about the weight of my front blade, I would guess less than 150# as I can pick it up and carry it. I'm just going to drag the dirt from the front of the garage to the back and level it out so I'm convinced this will owrk for me. I will probably get the King Kutter at TSC. If ever I get the Imatch thing will it line up with the KK box blade? Thanks again everyone.

  9. #9
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    111

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    KiotiJohn Pics resized. Thanks, sometime I forget that other people don't have fast connections.

  10. #10
    Elite Member Tractors4u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    2,542
    Location
    Athens Alabama
    Tractor
    Deere 4310, Kubota L355, John Deere SST18 Spin Steer, 2006 Polaris Ranger

    Default Re: What will fix my yard? -- Pictures

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Can a box blade be put on so the teeth face back and use it in reverse? )</font>

    You could, but it isn't the healthiest thing for your 3 pt hitch. It will put a lot of stress on it. As others have said, it is meant to pull, not push. It won't hurt it to do the occasional reverse pushing, but don't try too much with the 2210.

    I think you could do what you are asking with a box. With a 4ft box behind a 2210 with turfs it will take longer than with a larger tractor but it isn't impossible. I have moved a lot of dirt with a boxblade. Drop the scarifers all the way down on the box blade and make multiple passes. Get the dirt really broken up. Raise the scarifers up and then drop the box and start dragging the dirt away. It's too bad you don't have a loader, but you said your funds were limited and I can understand that. Keep at it and you can get this job done.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.