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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    303
    Location
    Amelia Va.
    Tractor
    John Deere 790wFEL

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    Maybe your spreader does not have an agitator inside the hopper ? The spreaders I have seen work are red cone spreaders with 750 lb capacity and I think the brand was cosmo?

  2. #12
    Elite Member RalphVa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    3,838
    Location
    Charlottesville, VA, USA
    Tractor
    JD 1025, previously Gravely 5650 & JD 4010

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    I've used the little hand spreaders to spread dusty lime. However, the granular is better. That's what I'd get for a big spreader. It'll take the lime almost a year to work its way into the soil anyway, granular or dust.

    Ralph

  3. #13
    Super Member greg_g's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    6,028
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Tractor
    JD3720 Cab, 300X loader with 4-in-1 bucket

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Maybe your spreader does not have an agitator inside the hopper ? )</font>

    Maybe Teddy's doesn't, but mine (a Caroni, I think) has a removeable agitator. The first time I tried it with crushed lime, I removed it - haven't used it since. The agitator compressed the lime at the bottom of the funnel - the last foot or so - to a consistency where nothing would come out. I had to dump the lime out on the ground, and basically chip the agitator out.

    And yes, the lime was dry - the spreader was dry - the day was dry. That's the point at which I went to granular lime, and never looked back. It costs about $30/tn more, a difference I consider worthwhile just to avoid the aggravation of a bunged-up spreader.

    Don't get me wrong, there might be better agitator designs out there. In my case I had to find out the hard way, that I bought one that was apparently not designed with crushed/powdered lime in mind.

    //greg//

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    303
    Location
    Amelia Va.
    Tractor
    John Deere 790wFEL

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    Man, sounds like a pain. I also use granular,but he asked about powder , and I have seen it done without any trouble, must be the exception to the rule?

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    532
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Tractor
    Kubota L4610, BX2230

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    I have a small manual push spreader, a garden tractor sized one, and a 500 lb. 3pt PTO spreader. The lime pellets work fine in all of them. Also, way less dust than the crushed lime powder!

  6. #16
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    48,626
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    The powdered ag lime is cheaper.. but doesn't broadcast very far.. peletized lime speads nice.. but cost more.. etc.

    That dusty lime runs pretty good thru a drop spreader though...

    Soundguy

  7. #17
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    285
    Location
    NW Wisconsin
    Tractor
    NH 1920 w/7308 Loader

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    I talked to co-op today about lime. They will come out to my place and spread ag lime for 19 bucks a ton. The 50 lb bags of pellets run 5 bucks a bag (200 dollars a ton) I pick-up, haul, and spread. Ummmmm........I think I know which route I'm taking!

    Also, someone mentioned that both will take about a year to change soil pH. I don't think thats true. I've always read that pellitized lime will effect the pH MUCH faster than ag lime. Because of the fast breakdown I believe the max application rate for pellets is 50lb/1,000 sq ft. If you're soil test calls for more you should apply in two applications sepatated by approx 6 months.

  8. #18
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    718
    Location
    Maine
    Tractor
    Cub Cadet 7360SS & Craftsman GT3000 23 HP w/50

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( Also, someone mentioned that both will take about a year to change soil pH. I don't think thats true. I've always read that pellitized lime will effect the pH MUCH faster than ag lime. Because of the fast breakdown I believe the max application rate for pellets is 50lb/1,000 sq ft. If you're soil test calls for more you should apply in two applications sepatated by approx 6 months. )</font>

    I was told the same thing by my local supplier, but if you google on 'pettitized lime' you will find reports from numerous universities that are similar to this quote from the UKy Extension Service

    "Contrary to popular belief, the speed of reaction of pelletized lime is no faster than that of bulk ag lime. "

  9. #19
    Veteran Member
    Approved Advertiser
    HayDR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    1,864
    Location
    Johnson City, TN
    Tractor
    JD 2040,2240, 2355, 2755, 4055

    Default Re: lime/fertilizer spreader questions

    Hydrated lime or often called burnt lime works immediately when applied to the soil. Pelletized lime and agricultural line needs 6 months to one year before the lime starts to react in the soil. It often takes 2 years for agricultural lime to realize its full benefit in the soil.

    CCM fertilizer spreaders available in 3 sizes from sub-compact to utility tractors. Prices Start at $275

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