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  1. #1
    Platinum Member
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    Jun 2004
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    Mahindra 2615 4WD, Ferriz 1500Z ZTR, Craftsman GT5000

    Default Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    I'm thinking of upgrading to wider Box Blade. Currently I have a KinkKutter with a fixed rear. I noticed that Howse has two types of Box Blades - Hinged and fixed.

    What's the difference? What would be better/worse with a hinged Box Blade?

    Thanks,

    Paul

  2. #2
    Silver Member
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    Jan 2005
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    152
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    Jennings,LA
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    Case IH D40

    Default Re: Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    I used a hinged box blade last week and it really helpsto loosen up the dirt inside the box when it slams into the back of the box when you pick up on the bow blade. Moist dirt that usually sticks in the box usually falls out when the blade slams againt the back of the box. It is somewhat annoying though due to the slamming of the blade. Other than that they work like any other box blade. Good Luck.

  3. #3
    Super Member Henro's Avatar
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    Jul 2003
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    Few miles north of Pgh, PA
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    Kubota B2910, BX2200, Yardman 20HP pos...

    Default Re: Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    I have not used one, but I think having the rear blade hinged may make allow the box to be more aggressive.

    Some units with the hinged rear blade are supplied with a provision so they can be bolted/pinned solid if/when desired.

    I am pretty sure the rear blade on my KK box rides on the ground somewhat at least some of the time. I am not sure if it does so enough to affect cutting ability. This question is probably more of an issue with a light weight box like the KK if at all.

    Initially I ordered a Woods BB (with hinged rear blade) but it could not be delivered soon enough so I got the KK. With use, I have concluded I kind of like NOT having the rear blade hinged. I like sometimes to tilt the BB back (high in front) and drag with the rear blade to smooth the ground. I don't think a hinged rear blade would be as effective,as without the hinge the full weight of the BB can rest on the rear blade...

    I don't miss not having a hinged rear blade, but then again I may just not know what I am missing! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  4. #4
    Platinum Member
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    Mahindra 2615 4WD, Ferriz 1500Z ZTR, Craftsman GT5000

    Default Re: Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    I like to use my BB as a pre-tilling tool to break up the turf and surface before tilling. occasionally I've wanted to be able to get it to dig a little deeper and thing the hinged rear flap would allow this. I'm sure it would not be too hard to pin it shut.

    Hopefully someone will give me a yeah or nay on whether or not this is a reality.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    799
    Location
    Southern Indiana
    Tractor
    JD 2440/4440/4020/4955

    Default Re: Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( I have not used one, but I think having the rear blade hinged may make allow the box to be more aggressive.

    Some units with the hinged rear blade are supplied with a provision so they can be bolted/pinned solid if/when desired.

    I am pretty sure the rear blade on my KK box rides on the ground somewhat at least some of the time. I am not sure if it does so enough to affect cutting ability. This question is probably more of an issue with a light weight box like the KK if at all.

    Initially I ordered a Woods BB (with hinged rear blade) but it could not be delivered soon enough so I got the KK. With use, I have concluded I kind of like NOT having the rear blade hinged. I like sometimes to tilt the BB back (high in front) and drag with the rear blade to smooth the ground. I don't think a hinged rear blade would be as effective,as without the hinge the full weight of the BB can rest on the rear blade...

    I don't miss not having a hinged rear blade, but then again I may just not know what I am missing! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] )</font>

    We have a BINGO!!!!

    The rear blade will "support" the weight of the box at times WHEN YOU DON'T WANT IT TO....

    The hinged blade allows the FRONT BLADE to do it's thing....

    After having BOTH kinds. I wouldn't consider buying another fixed-rear-blade box....

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
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    Central WI

    Default Re: Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    Yup!

    Woods HB72 or Frontier BB1172 (change last 2 numbers to alter width) are awesome choices for a super stout box blade without getting into inductrial stuff.


    I often wonderd though about a "spillover" system that would allow dirt to spill to the area between the blades futher enhancing the filling/leveling capabilities...

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
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    Jul 2003
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    Ford 1920 4x4 (traded in on Kubota). Case 480F TLB w/4 in 1 bucket, 4x4. Gehl CTL60 tracked loader, Kubota L4330 GST

    Default Re: Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    Paul,

    Below is pasted my thesis on a similiar thread. Since that post, I've had a lot more experience with the hinged blade and believe it fits my type of work best.

    <font color="blue"> I think part of the controversy surrounding box blades on this board stems from what we are each trying to do with them. This post reflects my own experience, observations, and conclusions, right or wrong. I’m sure they conflict with other’s.

    If you have hard packed dirt to move, you need the box blade to act as a true cutting instrument. If spreading gravel or fluffy dirt is the task, a box blade acting merely as a pushing/smearing device is adequate.

    For true cutting, the fixed front blade/fixed rear blade style of box blade is an awkward compromise unless you are willing to manually or hydraulically adjust the top link with each reversal of direction. Either way, you need to get the leading blade much lower than the following blade. My former box blade with 2 fixed blades, when leveled from front to back, had the front blade slightly lower than the rear blade. That seemed right since most use is forward and the front blade will dominate the rear. Going forward in hard clay, the front blade would penetrate and cut aggressively for a short distance until the rear blade started dragging. At that point, the box blade just skated along without picking up much more dirt. In reverse it was worse. The rear blade being higher, never had a chance to penetrate. Instead, the lower, front blade dragged and smeared, leaving the higher, rear blade to only push loose stuff. Eventually the box blade would slide up out of the bite. I had no hydraulic top link to get the secondary blade out of the way and manual adjustment was impractical.

    The other disadvantage to double fixed blades is the dead volume between the blades. When that volume packs with dirt, pushing and smearing is about all you can do since the cutter clearance is gone. Its not obvious what is happening unless you get down on your hands and knees. Its tough to scrape that dirt out since 2 sets of blade retaining bolts protrude into that dead volume. I think this is a problem with or without top link adjustment.

    A roll-over blade addresses these issues by only having one (double edged) blade. It can be rolled over to provide a single blade oriented to cut in the opposite direction. No tag-along secondary blade to interfere with the primary blade. No dead volume between two blades to clog up. A bonus is an intermediate position for “scarfiers only” operation. Expensive and you still have to throw a lever with each reversal of direction unless you buy an even more expensive hydraulically actuated lever.

    The option I ended up with is the fixed front blade/hinged rear blade. The way it seems to work is going forward, the front blade is low and the rear blade hinges up as required to keep from interfering with the front blade penetration. Going backward, the hinged blade bottoms out at a lower level than the front blade so that the front blade does not interfere with the rear blade penetration. Also there is no rigid dead volume between the blades to pack up with dirt. And, all this happens automatically when reversing direction-no operator effort required.

    I'm not up to speed yet with this hinged blade but my first impression with finish grading is that it penetrates in reverse so well that you can easily take off more than necessary. That’s quite a contrast from my old blade/technique and will take some getting used to. Its also heavier, on a different tractor, and there is a hydraulic top link too. At this point I can't say for sure why its better than the old one, only this it is definitely much better.
    </font>

  8. #8
    Bronze Member
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    2010 John Deere 2520

    Default Re: Hinged Box Blade - What\'s the difference.

    Great write-up, thanks

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