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  1. #1
    Gold Member rico304's Avatar
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    May 2005
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    316
    Location
    Cumberland County, Maine
    Tractor
    JD 4300 w/ FEL

    Default Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    I'm sure it is in here somewhere, but I couldn't find it in a search. Can I use a snowblower attachment on a tractor to snowblow my 250' dirt driveway? I've read both things. Rocks break sheer pin....to....Works great. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]
    Anyone use one on a dirt driveway? Thanks in advance! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  2. #2
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    278
    Location
    Buffalo, New York
    Tractor
    2004 TC30

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    They work fantastic. Just keep it about 3/4" to a 1" off the ground and start blowing.You might pick up a small stone here or there but if your shoots aming in a safe direction you should be ok. once the ground freezes even better. I used one on a all #2 stone drive about 150' long for about 5 years and not one problem. Just keep it off the ground a little. Mine was always used on stone so I welded a shim on the bottom that kept it up a little. I say go for it you'll love it.

  3. #3
    Gold Member rico304's Avatar
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    May 2005
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    316
    Location
    Cumberland County, Maine
    Tractor
    JD 4300 w/ FEL

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    Thanks jjcc246! I was hoping to hear from someone that used one in your situation. Thank you very much for reply!

  4. #4
    Gold Member TMcD_in_MI's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    297
    Location
    NW Lower Michigan
    Tractor
    JD 4310

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    I'll second what jjcc246 said. I've used three different snowblowers on our 700 foot gravel driveway and have thrown thousands of stones, some pretty big, with almost no effect on the blower. Up here in northern Michigan, once we get a nice hard packed layer of snow over the gravel, we don't see any more stones until spring. And then we get to rake up all the ones we threw in the winter. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img]

    Tom

  5. #5
    Gold Member rico304's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    316
    Location
    Cumberland County, Maine
    Tractor
    JD 4300 w/ FEL

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    TMcD_in_MI, appreciate the reply. I was told that you can't really use them on dirt driveways. Kinda bummed me out. I was hoping to hear from people that have used them on dirt to get their input. Hope more people post their experiences.
    Thanks again!

  6. #6
    Banned shvl73's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    2,552
    Location
    NH
    Tractor
    Mahindra 2810HST

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    I have a Blizzard B64 that I use on a 600' dirt drive with no problems at all. Adjust the skid shoes so it's up an inch or so and it works great.

  7. #7
    Gold Member
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    Mar 2003
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    489
    Location
    Southern Adirondacks, NY
    Tractor
    TC24D

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    I use one all the time on a gravel road and several driveways that are made of crusher run gravel. Like others have said, set your shoes high enough to get at least an inch of clearance. As winter goes on and things harden up, just lengthen out your top link to drop the cutting edge closer to the ground if you want. My Woods SS52 came with a grade 8 shear pin in the drive shaft, should have been a grade 5, I run grade 2 and keep a few in the tool box. They are cheap and easy to replace, I would rather do that than blow out something else in the drivetrain.

    The obvious advantage with the blower is you only need to clear what you want open, no extra clearing to make room for the next storm like you do with a plow. Hit it once and its gone!

    Brad

  8. #8
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    462
    Location
    western NY
    Tractor
    MF GC2300

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    I agree with the recommendations above. In early winter, I use my backblade, turned backward and CAREFULLY push the snow off the driveway, driving in reverse. All the cautions about pushing on the 3PH apply, but I have found it works better than putting tracks into the snow like you would if you drove forward on it. Once the driveway has frozen, the blower works great if you follow the advice given here. Good luck!

  9. #9
    Veteran Member escavader's Avatar
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    Mar 2005
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    2,057
    Location
    western maine
    Tractor
    bx-23 ,

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    If your plowing or snowblowing,its best if you can pack down the first amounts of snow in a dirt driveway,It gives you a nice frozen base ,so you dont pick up the rocks.If your blower has adjustable shoes,set them so you leave snow for the first couple times.If the blower is two stage ive seen very small rocks jam things up and break shear pins,its best to try to get a frozen base in my opinion.
    ALAN

  10. #10
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    954
    Location
    Farwell, Michigan
    Tractor
    JD 2010

    Default Re: Snowblowers on dirt driveways

    This is how I use my snow blower on my 300 foot driveway that is dirt, sand, gravel and a few patches of concrete. Using a snow blower on dirt and gravel works best if you set the shoes so the chute sets at least one inch above grade the first couple of times you use the snow blower and keep it high until the snow packs and ground freezes then it can be set lower until the snow melts and the ground softens with the thaw.
    Farwell

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