Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    140
    Location
    NH
    Tractor
    NH TC-40D

    Default Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    For anyone who cuts there own fire wood, I bought a "Woodsman" PTO cordwood saw last year. I spent many a winter with my father on the "catch end" when I was a kid and thought I should have one of my own. I don't do but 4 cords a year or so but I thought I would keep up tradition. The newer models have come a long way from the twisted leather belt unit we used to have. The cordwood saw works well although the pully system only uses two v-belts which slip a bit under load. I've tried tightening them a couple times but they 'still slip a bit. Going to swap out the belts with new ones and see if it solves the issue. Also, I've been searching for a log splitter for some time now and looked at a lot of models. I decided to take a chance on the Harbor freight unit mainly because of first cost. Unless it's making money everyday, I find it hard to purchase a top line piece of equipment to be used minimally around the yard. I originally ordered the 20 ton splitter with the 6 hp Robin engine, however it got backordered a couple times. Ended up going with the 24 ton unit with 8 hp Briggs. The splitter came crated and required assembly which I actually enjoyed doing (being a gear head and all). I modified the location of the control valve for better ergenomics. I have split about 2 1/2 cords so far - oak, birch, elm - and it's done everything its supposed to do. I thought about building one at first but I think it would have cost almost as much as what I paid for this one. I have purchased a few items from HF in the past - some good and some not so good - this splitter appears to be built fairly well. All the welds are decent, the pump is a two stage "Haldex" (which is made by Barnes) the unit has a hydraulic filter, holds about 4 1/2 gals of hydraulic fluid and all the fittings were NPT thread?! I admit, if I bought it to make money with I would have gone with a Timberwolf, but for homeowner use it's a decent unit for the guy who can turn a wrench.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Super Member Highbeam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    5,039
    Location
    South Puget Sound, WA
    Tractor
    Kioti CK30HST

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    So what's wrong with the chainsaw? Having never seen or used a cordwood saw like that I wonder if the blade gets dull, how do you move the log as you buck rounds? Surely there is some huge benefit to a saw like that, right? I think we need some action pics.

    Thanks
    Kioti CK30HST, FEL w/toothbar, 60" RC, 60" BB, PJ 10k trailer. Weekend warrior hauling 50 miles each way.

  3. #3
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    140
    Location
    NH
    Tractor
    NH TC-40D

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    A cordwood saw can be a lot quicker than a chainsaw depending on how its used. The way we used to do it after dropping the tree was to cut it into 4 ft to 6 ft lengths with the chain saw depending on the diameter. We usually then quartered the logs with a wedge and sledge hammer on site before loading the truck. The small stuff we left in 8 ft lengths. The wood was then hauled to the yard, stacked and tarped to dry/season. We always tried to stay a year ahead so that we would have enough seasoned wood for two wood stoves running all winter. We would then cut the seasoned wood to length with the cordwood saw and split down the larger pieces with a maul before it got stacked in the wood shed to be burned. Usually a never ending cycle of cutting trees, and stacking for the following year. I guess everyone does it a little differently, but I prefered this way it was a lot more organized and I believe we were handling the wood a lot less although in heavier pieces. Right now I have a mess in my yard with just piles of wood dumped in the woods getting slimmy from all the rain we have been having - some logs are even sprouting new branches?! Sometimes the old ways are best or at least in our memories.

  4. #4
    Super Member ronjhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,405
    Location
    SE Michigan, TX when its cold in MI.
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910 HST

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    I sold my Woodsman Cord Saw a couple of years ago. Never had problems with belts slipping. Mine was never stored outside. That may be why belts never slipped.
    One note on the Cord Saw. They are nicknamed Buzz Saws. As you may have already found out. That blade makes a sound that will make your head buzz for days after using it for a couple of hours. Always wear ear protection when using it.


  5. #5
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    140
    Location
    NH
    Tractor
    NH TC-40D

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    Yes sir they do buzz. Spent my childhood on the catch end - although I find it to my advantage to be a little def these days around the mother in law! I believe some of the earlier Woodsman saws had 4 vbelts in lieu of the two they are designed with now. I do store it out of the weather but I'm sure it was stored outdoors at the dealer's lot. Going to change out the belts. Thanks.

  6. #6
    Super Member ronjhall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,405
    Location
    SE Michigan, TX when its cold in MI.
    Tractor
    Kubota 2910 HST

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    I'm not sure they ever had 4 belts. I bought mine in the late 70's. It had 2 belts.


  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Posts
    2,264
    Location
    SE Wa

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    For stuff small enough to load on the carriage, a buzz saw is far faster and easier than chain saw.

    For slipping belts, belt dressing works. True, it is only a temporary fix and once you start using it, it usually has to applied for each use but beats putting up with slipping belts. It used to come in a 'stick' you rubbed on the belt while it was running. Now it comes in spray cans.

    Harry K

  8. #8
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    140
    Location
    NH
    Tractor
    NH TC-40D

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    I remember my father using the belt dressing stick for the flat belt. Thanks guys!

  9. #9
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,774

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    Mine is stored indoors, and the belt hasn't slipped enough to make a big difference. I have found that Id rather have it slip then to stall the tractor and cause damage. Ive found that I need to keep the blade sharp as possible and go slow with it.
    Definetly safer than the older ones.But noisy as the other have said. I still use ear plugs. Im 49 but my dad still refused to wear any , he is 85. Amazingly he still hears well.
    The "BUZZ" saw is great for his wood, as we have to cut ut to 11 inches or less. Cutting that short is difficult with a chainsaw.
    Last edited by Bedlam; 06-29-2006 at 11:15 AM.

  10. #10
    Gold Member knute_m's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    394
    Location
    Hilltop Hollow, WV
    Tractor
    Rehab of modern wrecks, now ranging from a 20 HP tractor, to a little Cat 320, to a really fun Cat 953 dirt mover.

    Default Re: Woodsman pto cordwood saw & HF log splitter

    Wow! I can't imagine ever going back to a buzz saw. But, its fun to see that somebody still uses these things.

    Until I was about 20 years old (and that was a long time ago) everybody I knew in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin who burned wood, did their cutting with a buzz saw. Usually the saw was mounted on the front of a tricycle tractor, running on a belt. I can't even begin to imagine how much wood I helped cut that way.

    The hardest part was having to spilt the cordwood lengths so that one or two men could lift them onto the sled and then onto the saw. Sure wore out lots of wedges and sledges. In those days we still did a lot of the skidding in the dead of winter with horses. I think the horses may have been the only ones who enjoyed this.

    I still heat with wood. Between the house and the work shop, I go through about 5 cords a year.

    I sure like modern chain saws. I sure like my hydraulic splitter.

    You guys have my admiration -- or is it sympathy? Keep up the tradition.

    Good luck,

    Knute

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.