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  1. #21
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    I had one of the bigger Stihl string trimmers and also had the metal blade (just like an 8" circle saw blade) that would cut pretty good sized saplings. But when the doctor told me to try to avoid, or limit use with, things with vibration like that and my chain saw, I sold it to my brother and he still uses it. I looked at several other brands of the wheeled trimmer/mowers, and sure didn't like the price of the biggest DR, but it does seem like the best machine. I use different sizes of string for different jobs and I also have a "Beaver Blade" which is a 12" diameter metal blade with a chain saw chain around it that will cut down saplings in a hurry. Of course, most of my use is with heavy string (.130") with the head cocked off to one side to mow under and/or along fences and around trees and buildings. And while my ground is a bit rough, it's relatively flat, except around the three culverts and borrow ditch across the front, and free of rocks. Now I'm certainly too lazy to say I like it, but I haven't found anything better for the jobs that have to be done.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Bird

  2. #22
    Veteran Member wen's Avatar
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    Apr 2000
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    1,513
    Location
    Central Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota M6800SD/LA1002 Loader Kubota RTV900

    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    I found the string in bulk, but it was a little smaller than the .130. The pre-cut are way too expensive to use. Any good sources of .130 in bulk and approx price or price/ft.

    The metal blade that fit my Sears trimmer was more like a smooth blade with notches in it not like a saw blade and it just didn't work very well on the big stuff.


  3. #23
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    Yeah, Wen, Country Home Products sells the .130" in bulk or pre-cut, but I buy it cheaper locally and cut it myself (about 2" longer than they recommend), and I prefer the 4 or 6 sided string to the smooth round string. And for just the grass in the yard, I prefer the .105" to the .130"

    Bird

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jul 2000
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    40
    Location
    New Hampshire

    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    Bird,

    Thanks for the words of encouragement. Right now since I've been cut in so many places without success (it looks like I've got zippers going up both arms), I'm a bit surgery shy. But perhaps the day will come when I ought to take a trip to Dallas.

    Thanks again,
    --Wayne


  5. #25
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    I know the feeling, Wayne. I've been in for surgery 5 times in the last 5 years, and only once in 43 years before that. I don't know how a person is supposed to find out which doctors are good and which are not, but I do know that this doctor specializes in hands and arms only, and folks come long distances, even from other states, for his services. And the other thing I liked about him is that he discusses options, leaves the decision up to you, and believes in surgery only as a last resort. When he operates on one hand, he prefers to wait 6 months to do the other one, but after 3 weeks, I told him to heck with that; the one he cut on didn't hurt anymore and it was time to get on with it on the other one.

    Bird

  6. #26
    Veteran Member wen's Avatar
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    Central Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota M6800SD/LA1002 Loader Kubota RTV900

    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    I own a horse drawn sickle mower, but no horse.
    -----------------------------now for the off topic stuff.
    I had a doctor tell me that wearing wrist braces while you sleep would fix 90% of the carpel tunnel cases. It was all I could do not to laugh at her. I absolutely didn't believe her, but have been doing it for 5 years now and the situation stays completely stabilized without surgery. Guess some of the old country docs DO KNOW what they are talking about. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]


  7. #27

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    Jul 2000
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    New Hampshire

    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    Thanks for the good word, Wen. I've tried the braces (only at night, then only in the day, then 24 hours a day, etc.). Accupuncture, physical therapy, Active Release Techniques, Chiropractors, Aquatic Therapy, Surgery (multiple times), etc. In short, if I thought it had a chance at working, I tried it. Perhaps something at some time will work, but no luck so far.

    Thanks again,
    --Wayne


  8. #28
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
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    Texas

    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    Wen, I think if you catch it early enough, the wrist braces might help (anybody need the two pair I have?). I've read that the best thing is immobilization. But I'll guarantee if they hurt bad enough, you'll shed those braces in a hurry so you can move your wrists and get at least a little relief.

    Bird

  9. #29
    Platinum Member JimBinMI's Avatar
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    Apr 2000
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    Location
    Coldwater, Michigan
    Tractor
    2014 Kubota BX25D-1

    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    Wen,

    Are those 6 hp engines diesel? Or have you been sniffing too many diesel fumes on that M6800 and now you're comparing gas engines to diesel engines? [img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img]

    JimBinMI

    We boys and our toys!

  10. #30
    Veteran Member wen's Avatar
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    Central Texas
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    Kubota M6800SD/LA1002 Loader Kubota RTV900

    Default Re: Sickle Mowers

    Jim,

    6 HP diesel is exactly the same as 6 HP gasoline.

    They really compare very favorably, when properly designed.

    I have driven a lot more gasoline tractors than Diesel tractors and they are low speed high torque engines also. Diesels are excellent choices as they will run on really bad fuel, have a lower cost of operation provided you use one enough to benefit from it, and have almost zero ignition problems. They probably would not have become so popular if the present emission controls had been in force at the same time controls were placed on gasoline engines. For someone that uses a tractor 100 hours per year, a diesel is not as cost efffective as a gasoline engine.

    On a string trimmer, probably one buyer out of 1000 would be interested since they burn only a few gallons per year.


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