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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    480
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    JD4310 eHydro with bells and whistles

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    cp1969:

    I've seen the Snap On trucks driving around, but not familiar with BK -- so how much $ increase over Sears? Are they guaranteed, as well? BTW, liked your "erudite" bio.


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Dr. Blurry, [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    I would suggest a technical manual for your machine. I don't have mine yet, but I've needed it a dozen times already (in 2 weeks.)

    A "Come-Along" could be handy for extracting yourself from stuck situations.

    A good long pry bar for wiggling around implements when lining up the 3pt hitch.

    A rubber mallet, and some various size pieces of wood for link pins that don't want to budge.

    A good grease gun.

    Along with the socket wrench sets, get good long extensions.. some of those bolts are a long reach (like the rear wheel bolts which need to be torqued routinely.)

    A big pack of bungie cords of various sizes always comes in handy.

    Lots of shop rags.

    I know most of these are obvious, but I'm always lacking one or another at just the moment I need it.. so making a shopping list of such things can be helpful.

    If anything else occurs to me, I'll add to the list. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Bob


    Bob Trevithick

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    480
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    JD4310 eHydro with bells and whistles

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Bob,

    Thanks for the input -- I hadn't even considered the pry bar; just how difficult is it to attach implements? I see that you have a 4300; congratulations. Since I'm interested in the 4300 or the 4310, any negatives so far? ANY info on your recent JD experience is appreciated.

    Bill


  4. #14
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    37,535
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Oh well, I'll throw in my 2 cents worth; to both agree and disagree with some of the earlier posts. Of course, over the years I've accumulated most of the tools mentioned, but since most of us can't afford all of them at once . . . ..[img]/w3tcompact/icons/frown.gif[/img] For the filter wrench you're going to need, get a "three-legged" filter wrench. It's the most versatile and dependable. For air wrenches, get a 1/2" impact (don't forget to look at the specs to see how many ft/lbs. of torque it's capable of - a decent one is 400-425 ft/lbs., top of the line about 600 ft/lbs, but some cheap clones go no more than 250 ft/lbs.), and a 3/8" ratchet. Impact for power on big stuff, ratchet for speed on small stuff. And yes, you need a grinder; bench grinders are indispensable for me (stone on one end, wire wheel on the other), but a hand held angle grinder is often preferable for sharpening blades (you DO have at least a 4" vice mounted on a work bench, don't you[img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img])? A power washer is great, but not a necessity (in my opinion), especially if you have "normal" water pressure or better. I use a much cheaper method; a gun to which I hook both an air hose AND the water hose; puts out a pretty good blast; not quite as good as a good power washer, but it works and a lot cheaper.[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Snap-on tools? No better, no worse than Matco, Mac, etc., but buying off those tools trucks is usually too expensive for what you're getting unless you're a professional mechanic.


  5. #15
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    1,693
    Location
    Southern VT, Southern ME
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 HST /410 FEL, R4s

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Blurrybill, If that's what the budget allows than a beam style torque wrench will be just fine. In fact the first torque wrench I ever owned was the beam style. Worked good until my buddy used it as breaker bar and sprung it. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/crazy.gif[/img]

    I'm recommending a torque wrench because you describe your mechanical experience as somewhat limited. Seasoned wrenches will describe going by feel and knowing when something is or should be tight enough and I'm sure they do, but if you don't have that practical experience how will you know? The last thing anyone needs is to strip out a drain plug hole in an oil pan or snap the head off of a M8 or 5/16" bolt threaded into a motor block or transmission housing.

    Click styles are more convienent to use as you don't have position yourself to try to the read the face. When you hear the click your there! [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img] They are sensitive tools and certainly can be damaged with abuse. Periodic calibration is usually recommended for any torque measuring tool. As for wearing out what I can tell you is where I used to work we had systematic calibration every 6 mo. on measuring tools in daily use. Rarely had to replace anything.

    Pnuematic air tools are very practical for loosening and tightening larger fasteners with high torque values.

    As for the tractor, what more can I say except, Nuthin' runs like a Deere. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

    DFB


  6. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    480
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    JD4310 eHydro with bells and whistles

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Bird and DFB:

    Thanks! Now we're talking. The details associated with your opinions really help -- I like to research and understand before I make a move; saves $ and headaches later. DFB, that one comment about not needing to see the face of the torque wrench helped make the decision to go the other way; thanks! I have to tell all posters that I've ghosted here for 2 years and still learn something every day. Keep 'em coming guys...

    Bill

    <P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1>Edited by blurrybill on 12/22/01 03:18 PM (server time).</FONT></P>

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    566
    Location
    Williamson, NY (near Rochester)
    Tractor
    JD 4300 MFWD

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Hi Bill,

    <font color=blue>...I hadn't even considered the pry bar; just how difficult is it to attach implements?</font color=blue>

    It isn't really difficult, in my limited experience, but you do need to get those attachment holes for the pins lined up just right so the pin can slide through. Normally this means getting as close as you can by backing up the tractor, and then wiggling the attachment a bit until the pin can be slid in. Some of these attachments run into and above the 500 lb range, so a little mechanical advantage can really help. Others with more experience can comment on this better than I, and will hopefully chime in.

    <font color=blue>I see that you have a 4300; congratulations. Since I'm interested in the 4300 or the 4310, any negatives so far? ANY info on your recent JD experience is appreciated. </font color=blue>

    Okay, my first suggestion is that you get any options you might want installed at the factory, rather than as add-ons by the dealer. Case in point, I recently found that the factory rear work light behaves as is should.. it's off while the light switch is in "road" position, so it doesn't blind or confuse drivers behind you. The dealer add-on version is on while in the road position. The dealer says they can't do it the way the manual specifies, so my choices are live with it or wire in my own switch to turn the rear work light on and off independently. Annoying, but nothing major.

    My other suggestion is to not take the dealer's suggestions and advice as gospel. My dealer told me there was no need whatsoever for engine block and hydraulic heaters in this climate (near Rochester, NY.) But after doing my homework, I got them installed anyway. Pick the brains of the incredible folks here, and talk to anyone you can. Then make your decisions. Obvious, I guess.. but I found myself believing the Deere dealer would know what's best for his own product. I no longer believe that.

    Let's see.. what else..

    For me, there was, and is, a steep learning curve in terms of diesel engines. Let them idle, don't let them idle too long, if you do let them idle a long time use a fast idle and/or change the idle speed from time to time. Is diesel fuel the same as home heating oil, do you need additives to keep from gelling, which additives are best, what temperature ranges should one use the engine/hydraulic heaters, and for how long. Etc., etc. Lots of opinions on all of these things.. do lots of searches on this board and you will end up having a pretty good handle on this stuff.

    Other than that, I have had no problems.. just happiness with the incredible capabilities of this machine compared to my only previous tractor experience.. little GT235 and a friend's little Toro garden tractor.

    I suggest reading all of the safety links posted by John Miller and others here. You can get into trouble so fast and in so many ways that it boggles the mind. I found I needed to develop a balanced view of it all, combining elements of fear, and respect.. but also the confidence that comes with knowing the right ways to do things.

    So far, and remember that I only took delivery of this machine a couple weeks ago, I'm more than happy with my choice, and I can live with the dealer. He has his quirks, but he's okay. Make sure you find a dealer you can say the same or better about.

    Best wishes, happy holidays, and good luck! You're in the right place!

    Bob


    Bob Trevithick

  8. #18
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    424
    Location
    Akaroa South Island ,New Zealand (about 1/2 way down south island)
    Tractor
    8350 valmet with 980SL FEL duels had a 150 Hp deutz just sold it 10 NOV 01

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Hi ya
    well i'll steap on a few toes here but here goes frist lot of tools all hand held 1/4 ,1/2 ,3/4 scockets 3/8 don't waste ya time even 1/4 ya find ya don't use a lot ring/open end spanners ya get just ring and just open end but for what ya doing combo spanners will do ya can always buy just 1 spanner to do a job instead of a full set that never get used..grease gun your call on that ,pry bars yep handy pays to have 2 or 3 .. shop rags... grinder 4 inch is a good size ..air compresser very handy and water blaster even handy around the home for washing walls ..end of the day ya dont need a full shed of tool to work on ya gear ya will find on most tractors for day to day fix ups 6 or so spanners will cover every bolt ya will work on , ya dont have to look like a pit crew if i had a cam i'd take a pic of all my tools the whole lot would fit in the boot/trunk of a VW and there has only been one time ive had to call in spare tools ...
    catch ya
    JD Kid


  9. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    480
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    JD4310 eHydro with bells and whistles

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    jdkid:

    Man, would I like to backpack (trek?) and flyfish your part of the world -- a long-time dream that may never be realized. Anyway, thanks for the input; it sounds as though several TBN members take a conservative, practical approach. With what a JD costs, that is sensible. Take care.

    Bill


  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    480
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    JD4310 eHydro with bells and whistles

    Default Re: What makes a good tool kit?

    Hey, Bob:

    Thanks for that firsthand info from your JD experience. With an interest in the 4310, I may be able to order. Anything besides the worklight that is better installed by the factory? Also, you mentioned a steep learning curve for diesel engines -- what kind of fuel tank did you purchase? I will be only about 6 miles from town and can transport small quantities easily. If you have a tank, do you need to add fuel stablilizers or other additives depending on how quickly it is used? BTW, my "tractor" experience is a couple of years on my JD LX279 -- sounds like we both started similarly. It is a great little tractor, but not nearly what is needed on our acerage. Here in central Iowa, green dealers are everywhere, but several are one-owner, so one has to travel a bit for a competitive bid. I have followed some links debating a trustworthy local dealer over a better price farther away and haven't as yet made a decision on that aspect. However, until Deere comes out with specs and prices, it's a moot point. Are you planning on maintaining your machine? Again, opinions on tool collections are wanted/needed.

    Bill


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