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  1. #1
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Posts
    504
    Location
    Vermont, Franklin County
    Tractor
    NH1720, .

    Default Block Heaters

    Guess for this forum I'll call this a very small attachment. My block heater went out and now I need a new one. Went to Napa and all they had was block heaters for cars etc. Talked to a few people and they gave me several names for the block heater. In-line, low line block heater etc.
    It is in the low line on the side of the motor. So before I go and show more ignorance at the part store. What is the correct terminology?
    Thanks for your responses!!!
    Al
    Pumpkin Village Settlement[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]


  2. #2
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Posts
    1,125
    Location
    Escaped to The Algoma

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    I take it yours fits into the block? If so it is not an in-line type then. Why not just go to your dealer and get the correct oem one,instead of a one-part fits all type?


  3. #3
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    Alan,
    If it goes in the block then you ask for a block heater and I doubt you will be able to find one except at the dealer. If it's an inline heater, meaning that the heater is actually in the radiator hose, then you ask for an inline heater. You will need to know the exact size of your radiator to get the right one. Those can be bought at any farm store.


  4. #4
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    220
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Tractor
    3130HST, Ferguson TO35

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    It sounds like you have a freeze plug type block heater. If you take the old block heater out and measure the diameter of the hole in the block-NAPA may have one if the bend of the electrode is right as it cannot touch the inside of the block. The block heater elements do go bad but some heaters have a replaceable cord that goes bad. I don't want to sound stupid but make sure you have current to the heater with a heavy extension cord. I would not let anyone talk me into a tank type heater that goes in a hose as they are not as good. You might also find out that you have to go to the dealer as previously stated. A block heater should run between 45-75 dollars.


  5. #5
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    930
    Location
    NW Ohio
    Tractor
    Kubota BX-2360

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    Mine was just called a block heater, but it's proprietary to the engine, in that it threads into the engine by removing a plug,(it's not a freeze plug). Yours may be special too, so if you don't go to your dealer, You'll probably have to yank the old one to match it up properly.

    Good luck...


  6. #6
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    220
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Tractor
    3130HST, Ferguson TO35

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    Good point about some block heaters being of the threaded type, something I overlooked. They are easier to install correctly as you don't have to worry about the heating element touching the block when installed.


  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    51
    Location
    Green Oak Township - South Lyon, Michigan
    Tractor
    1999 New Holland TC 29D

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    Now that SE Michigan is in winter mode, I plugged in my block heater (I had it installed on my TC 29D late last spring & never used it.). So far I am leaving it plugged in, I know some of you put them on timers. To me it would seem better to leave it plugged in, as when on a timer I would think the on and off (heating and cooling) cycles would promote condensation in the engine.

    The only down side I can think of is that they might last longer on a timer. What is the consensus of the group?



  8. #8
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    6,737
    Tractor
    JD 8320 MFWD, JD 6415 MFWD, FEL, and cab, John Deere MFWD 4600, John Deere 4020, John Deere 4430, John Deere 455 mower, Deutz, and Gehl 4610 perkins skidsteer

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    I don't about consensus but my vote is for a timer. First you're not going to get anymore condensation than if you went out and used it for a couple hours and turned it off. All the heater is doing is just heating up the engine like it does when it runs. No chance of condensation there. Second you are right they won't last as long if they are plugged in all the time. Third is that those puppies aren't exactly cheap to run. I figured it out one time and based on what electricity is here it would cost about $22 a month to run it full time. Even in the manuals they tell you that the heater only needs to run an hour or two to get the vehicle up to the temp. that the heater gets it to.


  9. #9
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    6,276
    Location
    central New York
    Tractor
    all makes and models

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    Some dealers only install the factory units, some build there own to keep you coming back to them. The in block design gives the heat where you need it, the tank style needs to be a little larger as you are heating a larger mass. The in line radiator hose is often used and most often the one that doesn't work well enough to do the job.


  10. #10
    Veteran Member gerard's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    1,681
    Location
    Syracuse NY
    Tractor
    Kubota L2500DT w/FEL

    Default Re: Block Heaters

    I have the threaded block type that replaces one of the freeze plugs. Went bad right after I took delivery of my tractor, Carver sent a new one out in a few days, screwed old one out, new one in, 10 minutes later all's well! It draws 400 watts so I don't keep it plugged in 24/7 either unless it's cold AND we're going to be getting snow for a steady period. Otherwise I plug it into a "thermocube" which only turns on at less than 20degF. I've also used a timer if I know it's going to snow and I have to plow the next AM. The unit I had on my international backhoe had a built in thermostat but it also drew 2000 watts!! Wouldn't want to keep THAT puppy running too much.


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