Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 46
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    179
    Location
    Southwest Indiana north of Evansville
    Tractor
    NH TC45D

    Default Re: Tillers

    I'm using a BushHog RTS74 on a TC45D. Most of what I did this past year invovled breaking sod for first time. Did the job just fine, though if I were doing it again I'd probably elect to use a middle buster or moldboard plow to turn it the first time. Only had it put a pull on the engine once and that was is some wet clay.

    Would I spent the money again for it ($1900) or shop around a bit? I'd look around a bit, but not because I am unhappy with the RTS.

    Paul


  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    415
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota B7100HST & Kubota L4610HST w/FEL

    Default Re: Tillers

    Rat
    Remember this pic? A tiller is a possibility in the future so I'll follow this thread.{thanks for the pic MChalkley!}
    regards
    Mutt
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #13
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Tillers

    Mutt - You're welcome! Actually, it's the effectiveness of those added-on scarifiers that made me go to the trouble of buying an extra plate to skid steer plate to weld on it, finding a hydraulic motor to power it, etc. The scarifiers made it a much better tiller. I don't understand why they aren't offered as an option by all the manufacturers - I guess it just hasn't occurred to them. I'd be willing to bet somebody does, though - the trick would be finding them.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,807
    Location
    Sharpsburg, Md
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 HST

    Default Re: Tillers

    Rat,

    Here's a link to the <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.landpride.com/lp/products/rta15_specs.html> Landpride RTA 15XX</A> model I purchased.

    For the JD 4100, I believe the maximum recommended size is 50". My JD Dealer sold me this one and it has worked like a charm. It has been used on various soil conditions and has never given me a problem - well except for one rock which caused the slip clutch to perform its magic.

    Does the tiller put a load on the PTO and tractor. Only when I put too much of a load on it. When that happens, I just slow the ground speed and let the tines do there job. You have experience with a Troybilt and know its capabilities. I have similar experience. There's a night a day difference between the two. The PTO tiller has a lot more power behind it and usually just picks the rock up and throws them out of the way. But occassionally....

    As a matter of fact, my PTO tiller cost me a little less than my Troybilt. I much rather have the PTO and the 3pt hitch take some of the abuse than me behind the Troybilt. And the time saved, no comparason.

    I think that a rotary cutter is more abusive to the PTO that a rotary tiller. The tines are closer together and rotating mass have much less momentum than the blades on a rotary cutter, so they will stop much quicker.

    Terry

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    457
    Location
    New York - Upstate
    Tractor
    Kubota 2710

    Default Re: Tillers

    I, too have been wishing for a tiller. I have never owned one, but one of the things I've learned is to pay attention to the direction of rotation. They are not all the same. For higher HP tractors, what I've heard is that a rearward rotating tiller works best. It naturally wants to pull backward against a tractor that is moving forward. This effect tends to keep it digging into the earth, but also increases the load on the engine. Now the tractor is not only trying to keep the tiller spinning, but also working extra to keep the tires rotating (hopefully not spinning). If you have a lower HP tractor, consider using a narrower width reverse-rotating tiller. the forward rotating tillers try to push you forward (so the power used for turning the tines is contributing to forward movement, rather than fighting it). In hard earth, this creates the tendency for the tiller to "walk up" or bounce up out of the earth and ride on top.

    This is still just theory to me, so I could be overestimating the impact of these characteristics.

  6. #16
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    62
    Location
    Penryn, CA
    Tractor
    Kubota L3450

    Default Re: Tillers

    I have a L3450 (30 hp on the PTO) and am using a Gearmore L series 63 inches wide. It covers both rear tires so I can till in both directions with out having to worry about the tire tracks. Make sure you can get parts (especially tines). In my area we need to replace tines every 3 to 5 years. My tiller has 40 tines at $6.50 each.

    carl

  7. #17
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    39,355
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Tillers

    PaulT, nothing wrong with your theory. I've only used a forward rotating tiller on the tractor, but I've use both forward and reverse rotating, walk behind tillers. I had a reverse (or counter rotating) rear tine Craftsman tiller when I bought the tractor and tiller, then sold the Craftsman. I know some people say you get a better tilled seed bed with fewer passes with the counter rotating tillers, but I would not buy one for the reasons you mentioned, plus a few more. For one thing, they are unreasonably high priced in my opinion. For another, if the tines are rotating in reverse, that means they may come UP under a root or other obstacle, and hang and break something, whereas with the forward rotating tines, if the tine comes DOWN on an obstacle, the tiller just hops up and over. And the final reason for me is that when you come to the end of a row (edge of the garden), and want to till right to the edge, the reverse rotation throws dirt out in front of it if you raise it while it's still turning. I don't like to have to rake so much dirt off the grass back into the garden.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    480
    Location
    Iowa
    Tractor
    JD4310 eHydro with bells and whistles

    Default Re: Tillers

    Bird/Paul: Boy, I learned something from each of you today. Great thread. I really want a tiller with my forthcoming tractor purchase and this info is really educational. The problem is I'm becoming more nervous all the time about how little I know. Thanks to all TBN members for sharing their ideas and experience.

    Bill

  9. #19
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    39,355
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: Tillers

    Bill, I'm sure there are some people who have no need or use for a tiller, mostly because they'll say they don't raise a garden. And that's fine, but for me the tiller is one of the most useful tools. I do raise a garden, so a tiller of some kind is the best gardening tool I know of. However, there are lots of other uses. Blades and box blades are great for smoothing and leveling, but what if you have big hard clods like we get when something is dug up when it's wet and then dries? On more than one occasion, after a septic system was installed, the ground settled, had to haul in more dirt, sometimes big hard clods. The tiller busted them up so they could be spread and smoothed, whether with the front end loader, a blade, or a rake. There are times when I want to move dirt, and I can tear it up with the scarifiers on the box blade, then scoop it up in the front end loader, but if I want it to be easy to spread and smooth, I run the tiller over it before scooping it up to move to where I want it. Sometimes if you want to level something and the ground is hard, you can just use a box blade, but of course, the dirt you scrape off the high spots is soft and loosened up, you move it into the low spots and it looks great, but after the first rain, the dirt that was moved settles, while the high spots you scraped it from were already hard and settled and don't move. If you till the whole thing first, high and low spots, then smooth it out, it's all more likely to settle together. Anyway, I think you're wise to be looking for a tiller for your tractor. Get one that's just as wide as your rear tires, or wider, and you'll find lots of uses for it.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    415
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota B7100HST & Kubota L4610HST w/FEL

    Default Re: Tillers

    MChalkley
    <font color=blue>effectiveness of those added-on scarifiers</font color=blue>
    yep, took one look and knew that was the ticket. got a folder for TBN gadgets to be built someday!!
    regards
    Mutt

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2016 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.