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  1. #21
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    1,574
    Location
    Waco, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota B2910; Kubota T1670

    Default Re: Tillers

    Bird,

    Some excellent pointers on tillers which I had not previously considered. I think I'll print your comments up and study them before I go talk to the "boss".[img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]

    Maybe she'll give in 'cause I just became a PLATINUM member![img]/w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif[/img]

  2. #22
    Banned RonL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    430
    Location
    Worcester, Massachusetts
    Tractor
    Caterpillar 416C IT, Caterpillar D3G, previously owned a Ford 1910

    Default Re: Tillers

    Bird

    Another thing tillers can be used for is roadbuilding. Portland cement is spread over a gravel ( earth ) base and tilled in. This mixture is then compacted. Naturally occurring moisture ( or possibly added moisture) solidifies this base. Voila! A road base.

    RonL

  3. #23
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Tillers

    Mutt - I used to have problems from time to time in really hard stuff with the tiller wanting to walk on top, instead of digging in and really chewing it up. Perhaps a reverse-till machine would do better in that situation, but there are other issues, there, too.

    With the scarifiers, it's the best of both worlds. I've never seen a situation yet where they were a disadvantage - sometimes I want them deeper than the tines, others about the same depth, but I've never wanted them up "out of the way".

    They'll pull up big rocks, or even stop the tractor if they run into something really big - and I'd a lot rather find something like that with the scarifiers than the tiller (you haven't lived until you've had a 900-pound tiller hopping up in the air banging away on a huge rock like a flamenco dancer!).

    But the biggest advantage of them is that they break whatever you're tilling up into "bite-size" pieces, so the tiller can make short work of them. One pass will usually till up most soils as well as two passes used to - a real time saver. I've had some real "flop" modifications, but this one has been a huge success.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,807
    Location
    Sharpsburg, Md
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 HST

    Default Re: Tillers

    Mark,

    How about a couple of shots of the enhancements you made (not on the tractor)?

    What and where did you get the materials to build the rig?

    I was wondering about the tiller wanting to "dig in" with the angle you have on the scarifiers. The previous post helps but I have trouble picturing how the scarifiers actual work.

    Input, must have input....

    Terry

  5. #25
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Tillers

    Terry - Sure, I think some pics could be arranged...

    The scarifier is a scarifier bar that can be purchased separately from Landpride. It comes with a three-point-hitch on the front of it and a three-point "receiver" on the back. It's made so you can hook it up to a tractor, then put a blade or rake or whatever on behind it. I couldn't use it that way, of course, because the PTO shaft had to go through. So, I cut all the three-point-hitch stuff off the top of it, which left me with just a scarifier bar. If I had it to do over again, I'd try to find an old beat-up box scraper and cut the scarifier bar out of that.

    As to function, if the ground is pretty soft, it can have a tendency to pull the tiller down a bit, but this is easily controlled with the angle of the teeth via the top link (especially if you have "top and tilt"), and by raising the scarifiers a notch. I've really never seen it want to do that to any objectionable degree but once. And it was easy to overcome. If you had to, of course, you could raise the scarifiers all the way up, but I've never seen a reason to.

    When you're pulling the scarifiers through really hard ground, there's a fair bit of pressure against the top link, of course, which tends to raise the tiller out of the ground unless the top link is adjusted to the right length (again, t-n-t helps a lot here), but the pressure against the top link is still less than it would be with a box scraper, because of the tiller's added weight.

    Does this answer your questions about how the scarifiers work?

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    1,807
    Location
    Sharpsburg, Md
    Tractor
    John Deere 4100 HST

    Default Re: Tillers

    Mark,

    You answered my question very well, thank you. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/king.gif[/img]

    You also have some good ideas for getting the scarifiers. I may have to hit the auctions this year to get a beat up box blade. Having the pictures for reference would be real handy. So whenever you get a chance, it would be great. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Terry

  7. #27
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Posts
    960
    Location
    Tescott, Kansas
    Tractor
    Kubota L5740/cab with air ride seat

    Default Re: Tillers

    blurrybill
    I got mine last march and give 2450 plus tax and it was delivered to my place. 2570 -6 tine and slip clutch it is a REAL HOG compared to my old LP 15-50 tiller

  8. #28
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Tillers

    Terry - I'll work on the pictures, maybe tomorrow. Keep in mind, too, that, to get a scarifier bar the right length, you might want a box scraper a little wider than the tiller. Ideally, you want a tooth just about centered on the tines on each end, with the rest of them equally spaced between them. It's not super critical, but, ideally, you'd do it that way. As the saying goes, if you're going to go to the trouble to do it, you might as well do it right...

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    349
    Location
    Peculiar, MO
    Tractor
    B2400 Kubota

    Default Re: Tillers

    if you are going to do it right, why not buy a chisel and chisel first , then till. One must remember to make sure your tractor has the power to handle the equipment. The idea of using ground breakers before tilling virgin ground is great, if your tractor can handle the extra load. You can buy a five or six foot chisel, once you have this you can really work the ground.

    Dan L

  10. #30
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    3,239
    Location
    Eastern Virginia
    Tractor
    EarthForce EF-5 mini-TLB (2001)

    Default Re: Tillers

    Dan L - That's one of the beauties of having the scarifiers on the tiller: The tiller is helping helping you push the scarifiers. Now, I doubt that the engine power, once converted to PTO power, transmitted through a shaft, then another gearbox and chain or gear drive, is going to be as efficient as applying that power to the wheels, but the limiting factor on most CUTs when pulling ground engaging implements is traction not horsepower. So using some of that horsepower that you really can't get to the ground anyway to turn a tiller that will push the scarifiers while the tractor is pulling them makes for an excellent combination. Plus, you save a lot of time by doing it in one pass. At least, that's been my experience. YMMV.

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