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  1. #1
    Silver Member fattyfat1's Avatar
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    MY DEALER SUCKS, WA
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    John Deere 2305

    Default PTO driven log splitter?

    i have seen many 3pt. logsplitters that use tractor hydraulics, but do they make one where the PTO drives a hydraulic pump so you don't have to use the tractors system?
    JD 2305, 200cx FEL, 48" MID MOWER, BALLAST BOX

  2. #2
    Veteran Member
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    Northern VA, USA
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    Mahindra 6000 MWFD, 2 1950's Farmalls, 1974 Farmall 140, 1967 Mf 135Delux

    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    Quote Originally Posted by fattyfat1
    i have seen many 3pt. logsplitters that use tractor hydraulics, but do they make one where the PTO drives a hydraulic pump so you don't have to use the tractors system?
    They do...you can actually take a 3ph hyd log splitter and put a pto pump on it. I use a pto pump on my BH. Saves the hyd system on the tractor (rear end will get quite hot if used a lot). Only thing is you need a resevoir to hold the fluid as in an engine powered unit. BobG in VA

  3. #3
    Bronze Member nosliw's Avatar
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    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    i think just biting the bullet and setting up a powerbeyond kit one time, then just plugging a hydraulic line in each time is a lot simpler than having to fumble with a driveshaft. and since hydraulics are already pumping in your tractor you might as well utilize them.

    just my opinion.
    JD 990
    GMC D/A

  4. #4
    Silver Member fattyfat1's Avatar
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    John Deere 2305

    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    nosliw, i agree 100% but i have heard that log splitters are very hard on tractor pumps and most take a hydraulic capacity of 11 gal. per minute. my tractor is small with only 5.2 gal. per min.
    JD 2305, 200cx FEL, 48" MID MOWER, BALLAST BOX

  5. #5
    Bronze Member nosliw's Avatar
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    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    wow, 11gpm!

    i think my 990 could BARELY muster that.

    can i ask why a tractor-powered unit and not the normal lawnmower engine setup?
    JD 990
    GMC D/A

  6. #6
    Super Member greg_g's Avatar
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    Western Kentucky
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    JD3720 Cab, 300X loader with 4-in-1 bucket

    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    Quote Originally Posted by fattyfat1
    nosliw, i agree 100% but i have heard that log splitters are very hard on tractor pumps and most take a hydraulic capacity of 11 gal. per minute. my tractor is small with only 5.2 gal. per min.
    I've never once heard it said that splitters are hard on tractor pumps. I can't imagine why they'd be any better or worse than any other hydraulic requirement.

    Anyway. Like all other implements, you size the splitter to the tractor. When the pump is at operating RPMs, pressure is a constant. What drives GPM from that point is the size of the splitter cylinder AND the time it takes to extend/retract. The more GPM you pump, the faster the cycle time.

    //greg//
    USN (Ret)
    Former Chinese tractor owner (x4)
    Current John Deere owner

  7. #7
    Silver Member fattyfat1's Avatar
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    John Deere 2305

    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    can i ask why a tractor-powered unit and not the normal lawnmower engine setup?[/QUOTE]

    because i'm a gadget freak. also i thought it would be cheaper.....not the case.
    JD 2305, 200cx FEL, 48" MID MOWER, BALLAST BOX

  8. #8
    Platinum Member
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    Amanda, OH
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    John Deere 5400, Farmall H, Farmall Cub, Allis Chalmers CA

    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    [QUOTE][I've never once heard it said that splitters are hard on tractor pumps. I can't imagine why they'd be any better or worse than any other hydraulic requirement/QUOTE]

    Most things your tractor pump powers are fairly intermittant giving the system some cool time. And most tractors don't have much hydraulic reservoir volume. A splitter is very demanding on a pump an can create gobs of heat. The factory splitters sometimes have as little as 5 or 6 gals of fluid and after a few hours of splitting in temps above 50 degrees you can't touch the cylinder or tank. Imagine that heat on the fluid shared by the tranny. A separate pump and right sized reservoir will make a system capable of running year around and years to come without undo wear and tear on the tractor. And then theres always the issue of most CUT's don't have very large pumps to begin with.

  9. #9
    Super Member greg_g's Avatar
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    JD3720 Cab, 300X loader with 4-in-1 bucket

    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    Quote Originally Posted by wkpoor
    Most things your tractor pump powers are fairly intermittant giving the system some cool time. And most tractors don't have much hydraulic reservoir volume. A splitter is very demanding on a pump an can create gobs of heat. The factory splitters sometimes have as little as 5 or 6 gals of fluid and after a few hours of splitting in temps above 50 degrees you can't touch the cylinder or tank. Imagine that heat on the fluid shared by the tranny. A separate pump and right sized reservoir will make a system capable of running year around and years to come without undo wear and tear on the tractor. And then theres always the issue of most CUT's don't have very large pumps to begin with.
    I think you're using an unreasonably small frame of reference. A TPH splitter does in fact represent intermittent use to the tractor's hydraulic system. It's only pumping under pressure while the cylinder is being extended. Pressure's relieved on the return stroke. Fresh (cooled) oil is picked up for the next pressure stroke.

    And my tractors don't share; the 454 for example has a hydraulic sump that holds 6+ gallons of AW32, and tranny/diff/shuttle housings that share about 9 gallons of gear oil. The 354 holds proportionately the same. I've split huge pieces of ash/hickory/oak for hours on end, never ever once had a heat problem. Even the cylinder doesn't get hot, I lean on it regularly to rest between some of the bigger chunks.

    So I gotta say - at least the way I've sized my splitter choice to my tractors - heat is not a problem for me. Nor is flow - I split everything with 1100-1200 engine RPMs. So I think it's also safe to conclude my pump isn't unreasonably overworked either.

    //greg//
    USN (Ret)
    Former Chinese tractor owner (x4)
    Current John Deere owner

  10. #10
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
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    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: PTO driven log splitter?

    Quote Originally Posted by fattyfat1
    nosliw, i agree 100% but i have heard that log splitters are very hard on tractor pumps and most take a hydraulic capacity of 11 gal. per minute. my tractor is small with only 5.2 gal. per min.
    Go look at all those log splitters sitting in front of TSC or any home improvement store. They put out nowhere near 11GPM. They only have 6 or 8 HP engines. Our PT425 tractor puts out 8GPM at 2500psi and that is with a 25HP engine.
    MossRoad

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