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  1. #1
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    Default Evolution of sprockets

    I'm curious of the evolution of track sprockets. I replaced my T190 sprockets. The old sprocket is very hard. A file barely scratches it. The new sprocket is a casting that is much softer.

    Any one know the history and whys of track sprockets?
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    JRP

  2. #2
    Veteran Member dirt ditch's Avatar
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    which one?

    Default Re: Evolution of sprockets

    Aftermarket or Bobcat replacement part?

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Evolution of sprockets

    $$$$$$$. Pure and simple. It is cheaper to make a casting vs. a weldment.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dirt ditch
    Aftermarket or Bobcat replacement part?
    ItThey were Bobcat made in USA
    JRP

  5. #5
    Veteran Member CliffordK's Avatar
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    Default Re: Evolution of sprockets

    If you've worn out the old sprocket with hardened steel.
    And, the new one is a soft cast steel, with hollow teeth. How long will it last?

    I would, of course, make sure you replace the chain at the same time you replace the sprocket. Did you replace both sprockets?

    You may consider trying to make your own sprocket. Keep the old one. Either cut a new sprocket, or perhaps find a good steel sprocket, and weld it onto the base plate. Then harden and temper it.

    There are some places for softer, malleable steel, but I'm not sure this is one of those places.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Well, these are track sprockets, as listed in the first post. The chain is two $1300 tracks. The tracks are fairly new, perhaps 70%. The sprockets were replaced th maximize the track life.

    The old sprockets still worked, so ill store them for now.
    JRP

  7. #7
    Platinum Member catdozer's Avatar
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    Default

    The reason the old ones are so hard is cause the tracks hammered the old sprocket steel hard. The new ones will wear at first but then hardened up.
    That's what dealer told me when I did my T190 and T320
    Bobcat CT235 with Deere Imatch, And a very bad addiction of attachments

  8. #8
    Super Member LD1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Evolution of sprockets

    Yep. I doubt they were very hard to start with. But years of work-hardening...
    ".........there is only one way to find out."
    "Ok, hold my beer and watch this.........."


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  9. #9
    Veteran Member SSdoxie's Avatar
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    Default Re: Evolution of sprockets

    The original sprocket was a softer grade and had a surface hardening applied after is machined and welded to the hub. The cast sprocket is made of harder grade steel equal to the original surface hardening. Once the thin layer of surface hardening worn through the old sprocket would wear down much faster. The cast is same hardness throughout so wear down time will be equal through the life of it. Replacement cost of the cast sprocket is 45% less than the old welded/machined sprocket, so you can replace both for little more than what 1 old style was.
    Dennis

    CT225 w/7TL QA FEL, 60"tooth dirt bucket, 68" smooth bucket, Pallet Forks, Bale Spear. Hydrualic top llin, QH, 48 RC, 60" tiller, Angle blade, Landscape rake, Carry-all, Post hole auger.

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