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  1. #31
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,157

    Default Re: Home made loader

    I thought that was what your last 3 posts were doing? (well, 10-30 years old anyway).

  2. #32
    Elite Member schmism's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    4,857
    Location
    Peoria IL
    Tractor
    New holland TC(33)

    Default Re: Home made loader

    Quote Originally Posted by cruzer
    Simplicity - Attachments

    John Deere products for homeowners: Features for Attachment 45 Loader

    So i guess John Deere and Simplicity don't know what they are doing??
    EXACTLY but you missed a few, like kubota, and Newholland and ....
    http://hallbrosenterprises.com/siteI...ota-BX2350.jpg /scarcasm

    the point is for every one "garden tractor" size machine that might have acutally been built with a FEL in mind, there are a 100 out there that werent.
    Shall we discuss each and every one?

    the issue (in my mind) is spending a bunch of time, energy and money adding something that (in my mind) clearly (and grossly) exceeds the orginal expection of the use of the machine.
    if you READ that, its is generic of any brand, size, year, type.

    Its good advise for ANY "build-it-yourself" project you take on, no matter what the size.
    Steve - TC33D 4x4 FEL, dual rear remotes with toys

  3. #33

    Default Re: Home made loader

    schmism, I can agree with that statement.

    the issue (in my mind) is spending a bunch of time, energy and money adding something that (in my mind) clearly (and grossly) exceeds the orginal expection of the use of the machine.
    As long as it really "exceeds the original expectation". As Mith stated, all the
    tractors we are talking about in this thread had optional loaders available.

    durring the design of my small CUT, it was fully intended to come with a FEL so front axles, frames, attachment points were all designed to handle the increased weight, and stress that is put on those points/components.
    Same goes for my John Deere 317, it has a thicker frame, cast iron front axle assembly with large diameter axles, individual wheel brakes and onboard hydraulics. You could purchase a loader directly from John Deere or by aftermarket from Johnson. If you wanted to go further you could by a small Brantly Backhoe that would fit it also.

    Here is my story:

    I currently have about 6 acres out in the country and was in need of a tractor. The house was new and the yard was not landscaped at all, not to mention I needed to put up a barn/fence for the horses and do a garden. I went to the dealers and looked at all sorts of different tractors. The compact utility tractors with the attachments I wanted were well out of my price range. I started looking at used tractors, but the CUT tractors really hold their value, so there wasn't too much of a price break there. I ended up doing a little research on Garden sized tractors and which ones had the options of adding a loader and other attachments. I ended up at the John Deere dealer and bought my 317.

    I then started looking for a 44 loader for it, yes there are some out there, but they average about $2500 if they are in good condition. I had some steel available and chose to build one instead, total cost of the loader was around $600, alot less than a used 44 loader.

    Once I was done with the loader I took it over to the neighbors house to show it off. At first he kind of laughed at it, but then I went out behind his barn and showed him what it would do. We moved 22 tons of gravel and spread it in his driveway. He was very impressed with the tractor/loader combination and frequently asks to borrow it.


    Have I spent my time well ................... I think so. It gave me a good winter project and having the loader has cut down alot of time on projects, where without it, I would have been using a shovel.

    Have I spent my money well ................... Yup, I saved ALOT buy buying the garden tractor and building the loader, when compared to buying a new CUT with a loader. As a bonus I have a tractor that is the "right" size for my place and what I plan on doing with it. (I didn't mention it above, but I did dig a 4 foot deep horse pond with it.)

    Does it exceed the original expectation of the use of the machine ??........... I don't think so, it was offered with a loader and all I did was build my own instead of buying a John Deere loader. John Deere advertised the 44 loader as having a lift capacity of 400 lbs (that is lifting capacity above and beyond the weight of the loader itself.). Why would they advertise that capacity and then put a weak front axle under it? The answer is simple, when they designed the tractor it was fully intended to have a front loader on it ??. (Kind of sounds familiar.)

    the issue isnt the SIZE of the machine (BX line of kubota's are very capable)
    Take a look at the spec sheet on the Kubota BX Loader, it is rated to have a 400 lb lift capacity, same as my John Deere 317. So I agree, the issue is not the SIZE.

    The bottom line is common sense. The tractors we are talking about in this post are Garden Tractors, which are a built a lot stronger and beefier than your average Murry Lawn Mower. If you plan on spending the time, money and effort to build a loader, do a little looking, find a tractor with a strong frame that will handle the additional weight and abuse.

    Scott

  4. #34

    Default Re: Home made loader

    2manyrocks,

    The box blade was the first project I built for the tractor. I fabricated my own lift, it is kind of a combination of sleeve hitch and 3 point. It will ift the bottom of the box about 10" above the ground. I did have to add weight to use the box. I filled the rear tires with fluid and if you look on the back of the box blade itself it also has some weight. The black bar acrossed the back of the box is a removable and weights about 80 lbs. Filling the tires and adding a little weight to the box made it work great. I can overflow the box with gravel when grading the driveway. I also have provisions on the back of the tractor (you can't see them very well in the pics, but they are where the canopy attaches) that allow me to add additional tractor weights to the back of the tractor. If I am working with the ripped teeth on the box blade I usually throw on some additional weight.

    Overall, I think it works really well. My only problem is the the typical box blade issue, when the rear of the tractor dips in a rut, the box blade creates another dip! In the future I may end up making a land leveler type setup using the box blade to get around that, but for now the blade works great.

    Scott

  5. #35
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,237

    Default Re: Home made loader

    Thanks much. You've done such a great job. At first, I didn't even realize this was a garden tractor until I saw the 317 on the hood. It looks like a CUT with factory attachments--that's why I had to ask if you bought or built the box grader. Yours looks much better built than the one I have for my YM226D.

    One advantage of a GT is you can use it and store it in a much smaller space than a CUT. I think the real limitation of a GT is tire traction. If you can solve that with wheel weights or fluid or dual tires, etc., then the its use increases so much. I think the other limiting factor for a GT is finding implements at a reasonable price. $2500 for a factory FEL for a GT is price prohibitive, and I understand why you chose to build your own.

    Are you running the FEL off the 317's hydraulic system or did you have to add another hydraulic pump? Which engine do you have on that 317?

    How about some pictures showing how you made the rear lift and maybe some pictures of that box grader? I would like to build a rear lift for my garden tractor and would like to see how you made yours.

  6. #36
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,210
    Location
    the Steernbos (Holland)
    Tractor
    Zetor 3011, Zetor 5718

    Default Re: Home made loader

    Schmism, i feel the same way about building all these implements for, basically just lawnmowers... But the big thing is: some people dont NEED a larger tractor, and dont even need that loader: It's just a lot of fun to build, and it comes in very handy as well, if you have the time to spend all day moving some dirt, instead of hiring someone who does the same job in a half an hour.
    On the other hand, often you just dont hire someone for a half hour job....

    the only thing i'm worried about, is the absence of powersteering and front wheel drive... since i've upgraded from a 1964 2wd Deutz D50 with 500 kg loader, to a 1986 mfwd Zetor 5245 with self levelling 1200 kg loader and powersteering, the idea that i was loading 120 ton of muck each year with that awkward old Deutz, is getting kinda funny when i look back...

    It's just about what machinery your reference is... are you used to a shovel and a wheelbarrow to do chores, or a full size farm tractor loader, or maybe a construction loader ?
    Free scrap is a good investment !!!
    “The worst enemy of life, freedom and the common decencies is total anarchy; their second worst enemy is total efficiency” · Aldous Huxley
    __________________
    1967 Zetor 3011, restoration in progress: Technically new, just needs the cosmetics..
    1973 Zetor 5718, home made loader
    1998 Volvo S70 TDI
    2007 Volvo 440 1.9 TD based dirt buggy, needs time !

  7. #37

    Default Re: Home made loader

    weak Loader frame couldn't handle scooping dirt @ 18mph
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #38
    Bronze Member blacksmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    66

    Default Re: Home made loader

    Here is a picture of my frame and disc brake of my 30 year old Dayton (MTD). That is 3/16 thick steel. The rear tires have 15" rims that is why I installed skid steer tires. They are much better than chains execpt on ice.




    I built a dumping scoop for my tractor over 20 years ago and wanted to up grade to a loader. Here is a picture of the Cat. 0 3ph scoop.



    Then I needed a back blade so I made my own. It will rotate 0,15,30 deg. right and left forward or back.



    Today it is much easyer to get Cat. 0 equipment but it my be pricey. I like building my own.

  9. #39
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    3,237

    Default Re: Home made loader

    Both of those attachments would be handy.

    A friend of mine has a back blade that also has an adjustable tilt, but I wonder if he even uses the tilt feature.

    I did a little garden tractor grading yesterday with a unit that only has a mechanical lift. The stops on it were a nuisance in trying to get the blade positioned. If it were a hydraulic lift, it would have been a lot easier.

  10. #40
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    105
    Location
    Kansas City Mo. area
    Tractor
    YM226D

    Default Re: Home made loader

    I wish I could find a 3 point hitch for my JD 420 lawn mower that I didn't have to rob a bank to buy it. I would add some homemade attachments for it.

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