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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    116
    Location
    Frozen North, Michigan
    Tractor
    Several Antique Garden tractors

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    I did not find the vibration to be a problem on the larger unit.
    Sitting in the tractor seat you can actually feel the vibration of the ground beneath you though. You could also feel the vibration standing on the ground up to about 10 feet from the roller.

    I have thought about using belt drive from the engine to the vibrating roller and it is probably a good idea even though the engine rpm should be less than 3000 rpm.

    Bill

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    457
    Location
    New York - Upstate
    Tractor
    Kubota 2710

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Can anyone here tell me what sort of total PSI is required to be effective at packing down crusher run in a driveway? THe roller I have access to is 6 feet wide and 24 inches diameter. It is heavy gauge steel, and can be filled with water, for a total weight of somewhere over a ton. What sort of footprint would this have in loosely spread crusher run (spread with a boxblade)? Obviously 6 feet wide by how many inches? Is that adequate with a vibrator mechanism on board?

    Also, can someone post a better drawing of how the eccentric weight/shaft is mounted and connected to a drive motor of some sort? I can envision this, but I would like to validate my fantasy[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  3. #13
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    51,823
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Define 'crusher run'. Are you refering to crushed concrete or gravel? Or reclaimed asphalt.
    Reclaimed asphalt can be compacted, and the more weight the better.

    Crushed concrete or gravel will not compact. You can drive it into the subgrade, and compact voids, possibly even fracture individual pieces with enough weight, but even then.. it would still be loose enough to dig by hand.... just mashed down making a footprint into the subgrade.

    Soundguy

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    457
    Location
    New York - Upstate
    Tractor
    Kubota 2710

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Crusher run means different things to different folks, but generally it is the entire output of running rocks through a crusher. I suppose concrete chunks would produce about the same results - we just don't see that around here much, though. Probably because rocks are cheaper and easier to get than concrete chunks. Gravel is the output after it has been washed or screened clean of the fines, or dust and rock bits. When compacting crusher run, the rock chunks are compacted among the fines. Generally a very hard, flat surface can be achieved on top of the layer below (without pressing it into the sublayer). When this is rolled with a large multi-ton roller, the surface is appropriate for paving (assuming you have built the road bed accordingly). Even driving your vehicles repeatedly over this surface will produce a very hard, flat surface. After a few rains (not deluges - that can wash out the fines), the surface can get to be very very hard. I just refinished my 800 foot drive this way, but I could benefit from a roller going over it. That is why I would like to know how much pressure is required to roll the crusher run into the hard, ready-for-paving surface I have described? Can I do it with the roller I have described in my earlier post? I doubt it will work without a vibratory device, but what about with one??

  5. #15
    Old Timer Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    51,823
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    I'm not sure what your local laws are.. but here in florida, we cannot use unconsolodated gravel as a finish grade material. The one conditional exception to this is a slaged road that has captive gravel embedded in tar can be overlayed.
    Reclaimed concrete can be mixed into the subgrade as well as asphalt, etc. Incidentially, reclaimed concrete makes decent stabilizer material... very easy to get a high lbr with it.

    Some states will let you pave over clay. Not having a sample of you 'crusher run' to examine the fines / silt content, etc.. I just cant say. Here, for instance, we need an lbr of 90+ ( load bearing ratio ).

    Keep in mind that a vibratory roller is used for deep compaction, and a static weighted roller like a 3 wheeled steel wheel roller is used for the finish surface. A bituminous (liquid asphalt emulsion generally) product called prime or tack coat is used to treat the finished surface, before laying the asphalt. The tack coat serves as a joining medium from the substraight to the asphalt surface course.
    Asphalt can also be laid directly on subgrade ( though much thicker ) and this method is called black base.
    Here are some basic ideas, our vibratory rollers are approx. 2 tons, some models are 3. Our static steel wheel rollers are in the neighborhood of 6-8 tons.

    I'll attatch a pic of our 3 ton unit. a yellow yardstick is included as reference. ( the 2 ton unit is just a smaller version, and seems to work fine )

    "foot drive this way, but I could benefit from a roller going over it. That is why I would like to know how much pressure is required to roll the crusher run into the hard, ready-for-paving surface I have described? Can I do it with the roller I have described in my earlier post? I doubt it will work without a vibratory device, but what about with one?? "

    Soundguy
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    457
    Location
    New York - Upstate
    Tractor
    Kubota 2710

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Did you go to school with PatrickG [img]/w3tcompact/icons/clever.gif[/img]?

    Here in upstate NY we can put any darn thing on our driveways we please (as long as it is not a substance on the EPA watchlist[img]/w3tcompact/icons/shocked.gif[/img]). Otherwise, we vote out them pollytishuns thats made them stupid rules[img]/w3tcompact/icons/tongue.gif[/img].

    I have no idea what "unconsolidated gravel" is[img]/w3tcompact/icons/hmm.gif[/img], nor do I think that knowing would help me answer my question in any way.

    Soundguy (or anyone else, for that matter), do you know much psi a roller would need in order to compact crusher run if that roller could vibrate? Telling me how to build a road in Florida, or how much pressure a 2-ton roller produces really doesn't help me, or anyone else who wants to build a homemade roller for such a job.

    Reminds of a guy I met at work when I first started. I was making the rounds with all of the folks I'd be working with, and he starts out our conversation by telling me that he LOVES to talk, so if I ask him what time it is, I better be prepared to learn how to make a watch[img]/w3tcompact/icons/laugh.gif[/img]. (I have been accused of this tendency on more than one occasion[img]/w3tcompact/icons/wink.gif[/img]). He is a great guy, and I enjoy shooting the breeze with him when I have some free time.

  7. #17
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    19,399
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Paul:

    You can rent small self propelled hand steered vibratory water filled drum rollers that are carried around in the back of a P/U. They will do an adaquate job on a driveway so I don't see why your roller would not work. Maybe stop by a rental place and see how the vibrating mechanism is made.

    Egon

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Posts
    457
    Location
    New York - Upstate
    Tractor
    Kubota 2710

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Thanks Egon, that's a good point. I have seen these things, and I've seen how they work on paved sidewalks, small driveways, etc. The finished product looks pretty good. It would make sense that if these things can compact stuff that well, that the roller I want to make (which should be heavier) should work, too.

    Paul

  9. #19
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    795
    Location
    New England...Central MA
    Tractor
    TC35D/16LA

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Paul,

    I'm no expert, but I think the compaction force is a function of the grade of the crusher-run. If you are using a large grade ( 3" minus ) you'll need more whack to pack it ... a coat of 1 1/2" minus or even smaller should pack well with less force. The stone dust you use under a patio is rock hard with only a bit of compaction. the small stuff just doesn't have the air space to loose !!

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    116
    Location
    Frozen North, Michigan
    Tractor
    Several Antique Garden tractors

    Default Re: Towed vibrating roller

    Whow, learned a lot more than I originally intended.
    I will be using my roller primarily to pack down a 20' wide by 250' long pulling track that is a flat as we can get it.
    Very little crown but the track is raised about a foot above the surrounding grade to keep the water off.
    The track is about a 40% clay to 60% sand mix about 8" deep over a packed "road gravel" base about 12" deep over the normal Northern Lower Michigan sand base.
    The track is normally disced up weekly to a depth of about 4", then watered, and then packed very well.
    Bill

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