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  1. #1
    Silver Member
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    Melbourne, Australia

    Default Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    Are there add on rectifiers that can be bought to turn an AC welder into a DC one?

    Is it that simple, or is there a catch?

    Cheers

    Rohan

  2. #2
    Elite Member
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    Mar 2002
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    2,829
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    Iuka Mississippi USA
    Tractor
    3550 Fard Backhoe and a 1948 Farmall Cub,

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    Rohan when I was 16 I got a job i n the machine shop of a small manufacturing plant. we mostly wire welded but when a Die block in the stamping room broke we had to stick them. This company was started in the 50's and had 4 old giant stick welders. One was a huge refrigerater sized General Electric welder that was AC. It did good bt didnt have neough penetration. an old timer in the plate shop part had some DC rectifiers he tried putting on the out put side but that was trouble some. They worked flawlessly on the input side. Used the DC contered power in the transformer. I welded alot with that welder. I Talked to friend that works there now and he said its used weekly. There also been a few posted in Farmshow magazine. You can go to Farmshow.com and look up back issues but you have pay for a reprint. I think this is the rectifier method they used.

  3. #3
    Silver Member
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    Location
    Melbourne, Australia

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    How do you put a rectifier on the primary of a transformer and have the transformer still work?

    I realise the output from a straight bridge rectifier really just has the -ve part of the waveform inverted, so you get lumpy DC.

    Cheers

    Rohan

  4. #4
    Platinum Member bobodu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
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    954
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    Whitley County,In.EIEIO
    Tractor
    Farmnought.Gravely Model L,Gravely Model LI,1941 Clinton two wheeler

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    Just google "welder ac dc rectifier" and be prepared to wade through a lot of info.
    Here is one of my favorite threads.

    Machine Builders Network
    1945 Allis-Chalmers,1967 Wheelhorse.The wife has a bubble hooded Simplicity and a Dixon.
    Anything green here- has roots or gets spent!!!


  5. #5
    Gold Member
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    Sep 2006
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    324
    Location
    Extreme Northern Wisconsin
    Tractor
    John Deere 2210

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    I have seen this on a Yahoo members page. One member did it with diodes on both leads.

    Dan
    "My tractors do not make up for my lack of manhood, but rather make up for my lack of childhood"

    -JD 2210, 200CX FEL, 52" MMM, and some addtions
    -78 Case 446
    -80ish 12 HP Workhorse

  6. #6
    Elite Member
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    Nov 2005
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    2,948

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    You also need a choke in line.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
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    Mar 2006
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    1,943
    Location
    Ozark Mountains in Arkansas
    Tractor
    Montana 4940C

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    Quote Originally Posted by Taylortractornut View Post
    Rohan when I was 16 I got a job i n the machine shop of a small manufacturing plant. we mostly wire welded but when a Die block in the stamping room broke we had to stick them. This company was started in the 50's and had 4 old giant stick welders. One was a huge refrigerater sized General Electric welder that was AC. It did good bt didnt have neough penetration. an old timer in the plate shop part had some DC rectifiers he tried putting on the out put side but that was trouble some. They worked flawlessly on the input side. Used the DC contered power in the transformer. I welded alot with that welder. I Talked to friend that works there now and he said its used weekly. There also been a few posted in Farmshow magazine. You can go to Farmshow.com and look up back issues but you have pay for a reprint. I think this is the rectifier method they used.
    is it possible that you might have mistyped what you were trying to say. I cannot think of a reason that diodes would not work well in the output side of a welder other than they might not be able to handle the current. On the input side I can think of a lot of reasons why they would not work starting with you cannot get transformer action with dc current.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    39
    Tractor
    04 Deere 4610 E-hydro

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    I have a Linde stick-tig unit and it uses a stand alone dc converter.You can use it with any ac power supply.

  9. #9
    Silver Member nate_m's Avatar
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    Jan 2008
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    142
    Location
    South West OHIO
    Tractor
    JD 2520

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    Here is a link to purchase a kit:

    DC Cheater - Home

    A little spendy but probably cheaper than buying a new welder if you already have an older buzzbox that still works good.
    ~Nate

    JD2520

    "I'm not your ordinary, everyday fool." - Clark W. Griswold.

  10. #10
    Silver Member alltoys's Avatar
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    Jan 2008
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    214
    Location
    Vimy, Alberta
    Tractor
    Montana R28

    Default Re: Turning an AC stick welder into DC

    I have welded for years with an AC machine. You can buy specific rod for the AC Buzz box, 6011 was designed for AC, so was 6013. You can also buy specific 7018 Ac rod it burns just as good as regular 7018 on a DC machine. About the only thing you can't run on AC is a TIG except if it is on high frequency for Aluminum. 7014 and 7024 burns better on AC than DC.

    What I am trying to tell you is there is other ways to make your AC machine perform to near high standard as DC machines.

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