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  1. #11
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    Nov 2009
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    30
    Location
    Bowie, Texas

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    Quote Originally Posted by brucewj View Post
    Nice build!
    Thank you.

    --HC

  2. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    30
    Location
    Bowie, Texas

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    Quote Originally Posted by jonc00k View Post
    Looks good.

    I am going to make something similar only on the 3pt as no loader on my tractor.

    I have some double acting cylinders to use so how do i plumb them in to work as a single acting?


    Jon
    Hey, Jon, this is what I did and it mirrors what, apparently, is done to make a single acting cylinder by the "industry" (but I'm not sure, so don't hold me to that).

    I ran a line from one work port on the DA valve to the side of the cylinder I wanted to drive. I left the other port on the cylinder open (had I kept using the cylinder in this manner I would have attached some sort of air filter (like maybe a crankcase breather filter for a car) to keep dust out of the non-driven chamber of the cylinder). I ran the other work port (the one I didn't want to use) to a T on the return line of the valve. The valve I have has 3/4" NTPF input and output ports. I used a black pipe bushing from 3/4" to 1/2" NTPF and then put in a nipple to a 1/2" NTPF T. I ran one of the two remaining open ports to the return line to the tractor. I ran the remaining port to the work port I didn't want to use. I had received a suggestion of simply plugging the unused work port but that would mean the tractor would be pushing full-power into a plug when I actuated the cylinder in one direction and I didn't want to have the hydraulics loaded up like that.

    When I actuated the cylinder in the power direction the air in the other chamber of the cylinder exited via the open port as hydraulic fluid was driven into the first chamber. When I actuated the cylinder in the non-power direction the fluid exited the driven chamber to the return line and the other work port on the valve released to the return line.

    It worked but it was too slow. I'm not sure if it was a restriction in the return line due to putting full pump volume into the line plus the added fluid coming from the driven cylinder chamber or if it was due to the anvil not applying enough load to displace the fluid from the driven chamber fast enough. I switched back to DA and the cylinder/anvil moved faster and I kept it that way.

    --HC

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    30
    Location
    Bowie, Texas

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    Quote Originally Posted by boggen View Post
    looks like you need rear ballest. box blade for weight example extra weight on the box blade. and put box blade on ground. to help stabilize the tractor some. granted front end will bounce some. but perhaps not as much. and give you some better stabilty when on a hill. and working the driver.

    i am with others moving controls back away.

    from watching video. it looks like you could make generic hinges. out of say 6" or 8" pipe. that you can open close with a hand pull pin to lock them.

    or perhaps welding a chain to one side and a hook on other. so you can just swing the chain around the post and hook it. with some slack in it.

    car rim cut in half and each half welded to create a grove / hole pipe fits into.

    flat bars with groves idea (see diagram/picture)

    at moment i could see end of pipe jumping out and do some serious damage to ya. or pipe bending and knuckling ya as it jumps out and away. seen it happen a few times. i tend to use the backhoe myself. i will put a larger size end that slips over top of post. then push the ground rod, t post or like down into the ground, by using the backhoe bucket. and i know them posts can do some pretty good jumping and flying around.

    but i have never seen a post driver up front and personal so the ideas for locking post in spot may be pretty far out there. or at least keeping the post were it should be and not some place else completely.
    Hey, Boggen, thanks for the reply. Especially thank you for the time you took to make the diagrams.

    Those are some good ideas. I had thought about the chain but not the other ideas. One problem I have (besides the fact that I'm not a professional engineer and have to kind of eyeball things with just whatever sense I have) is that the rail the thing runs on is only 9 feet tall. Since I designed it to drive posts about 2 feet into the ground I figured I needed about 4 feet of travel on the anvil, 2 feet of speed build up at the beginning to hit the post, and then a full 2 feet of driving distance to put the pipe in the ground without having to adjust/move the driver. When I quadrupled the line, though, it gave me about 54" of travel, plus the 31" or so the anvil is tall, plus the overhead of the pulley at the top and the wire clamps. Now the anvil comes to rest at the bottom of the beam, only about 5 inches from the end, and that restriction is only because I welded on a cleat of 4" channel to act as a failsafe stop in case the wire breaks so I don't have to leave the darned anvil wherever it is when/if the wire breaks.

    So, I don't have much rail at the bottom on which to attach a retainer, and up above, where you put the red circles, would get hit by the anvil.

    Still...I'm thinking now. You're right, if that pipe buckles, I'm going to be hosed. I'll grant that the pipe is about 0.250 wall...so it's pretty ridgid...but still.

    My first thought is to do the chain and weld a series of two or three of them at different places vertically along the back of the rail. Then I could string them around the driven pipe back to the other side of the rail and disconnect them as the pipe goes in the ground, one at a time, as the anvil has to travel further down the rail.

    In hindsight, I wish the rail was about 12 feet long, then I could have 3' of rail that could be used for a clamp like you've drawn to hold the pipe. Or the locking bars, either one.

    I have the backhoe on the tractor...not really shown in the video, I don't think. It gives me some weight and it's a PITA to take it off. I do have a ballast box (shown in the main album on my photobucket page, before I added about 500 pounds of scrap RR steel to it) but taking the BH off is a pill so I usually leave it on. But...I could drop the outriggers on the BH...I didn't think of that. That would reduce the bounce I get from the big rear tires. I'll try that, thank you, I hadn't thought of that before.

    Thank you again.

    Oh, and I see in your sig line you have a 555. Man, I got to use one a couple of times (and my father-in-law, four hours away from me has one). I love those things.

    --HC

  4. #14
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    8,067
    Location
    Shingle Springs California
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    I have one, but never got the extra hydraulics to run it.

    Speeco used to make a 3pt setup. An extra hydraulic cylinder is used to lift a weighted box that has a recess in it for the t-post. When it gets to the proper height, a trip lever is used to drop the box on the t-post.

    I posted pictures a while back; will have to see if I can find them.

    Quote Originally Posted by jonc00k View Post
    Looks good.

    I am going to make something similar only on the 3pt as no loader on my tractor.

    I have some double acting cylinders to use so how do i plumb them in to work as a single acting?


    Jon
    RobertN in Shingle Springs Calif

  5. #15
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,750
    Location
    Trivoli, IL
    Tractor
    SSTT (Sideways Snake Tain Tractor) and STB (sideways train box) tractor, dirt harvester

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    i wouldn't take my locations to serious. as i said. i never seen a post driver up front and personal. i just drew in the spots that seemed easiest for me to draw to help get idea across. found it easier to help get idea across with DIY'ers vs trying to get into the very specifics. due to for DIY'ers it is what ever they can find and get to work. that and most DIY'ers are tinkerers. once they get idea and half way plan (including myself). things tend to fall together fairly easily.

    as far as beam length and a holder at bottom. it looks like you already done some welding already. if ya got some scrap iron. make your a couple L shape brackets and come off the bottom of the beam with them. instead of welding. perhaps use a couple real long bolts. to hold the L brackets on.

    ============
    myself however wish i could weld. i would be turning 3" to 8" heavy duty metal pipe into a bucket for the backhoe. to just push pipe and T posts down.. though wooden posts might be a different story. haven't tried a 3" to 4" wooden post yet. granted for me. the same seat is used for backhoe and tractor. if ya had to switch seats. that would be a pain.

    p.s. i understand about pill and taking off backhoe. if it weighs more than i can lift by myself. generally it can be a pain to hook up. if you are not perfectly aligned up. and no one to help ya align things up. makes it even worse.
    Ryan

  6. #16
    Bronze Member santa2u's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    70
    Location
    Baytown, Texas
    Tractor
    Kubota L3400

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    Great driver. Wish I had the ability and equipment to build one of those babies.

    I hope I'm not hijacking your thread, but I have heard someone say that they drove T-posts by simply pushing it into the ground with their fel bucket. Is that possible? I have several T-posts to put down and hate using the manual drivers.

    I have a kubota L3400. I haven't tried pushing T-posts in, but I sure have pushed over some pretty good sized trees with it.

    Thanks,
    Don
    Don

    Kubota L3400 w/LA524 loader, 5' Howse shredder, 5' Sunshine box blade. Love my quick hitch.

  7. #17
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,896
    Location
    S. W. Virginia
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200, Ford NAA, IH 454D, Case 1845C

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    Looks good so far. I'm going to be building a similar post driver (but for 3pt) in the near future, so it's good to see someone with similar ideas. One of the simplest designs of this style post driver I have seen is the Vector Power Drive Models I and II. They have a pretty simple rope/pulley system and a good sturdy post cap/holder. I'll be roughly modeling mine after the Vector model II+ but in a slightly smaller scale to fit my small tractors.

    You may have seen this site already, but here are the post drivers I am referring to: Fence Post Drivers

    You can download a PDF brochure that has a lot of good pictures including some fairly close up of the mechanisms.
    Kubota B3200
    Ford NAA Jubilee
    International 454D
    Case 1845C skid steer
    JD 265

  8. #18
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    2,750
    Location
    Trivoli, IL
    Tractor
    SSTT (Sideways Snake Tain Tractor) and STB (sideways train box) tractor, dirt harvester

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    Quote Originally Posted by santa2u View Post
    Great driver. Wish I had the ability and equipment to build one of those babies.

    I hope I'm not hijacking your thread, but I have heard someone say that they drove T-posts by simply pushing it into the ground with their fel bucket. Is that possible? I have several T-posts to put down and hate using the manual drivers.

    I have a kubota L3400. I haven't tried pushing T-posts in, but I sure have pushed over some pretty good sized trees with it.

    Thanks,
    Don
    i used the backhoe bucket. due to the bucket has a little bit of a lip were the teeth are welded to it. which allows a little bit of a catch for the top of a T post to grab ahold of. it takes some practice and good hydrualics that you can count on not being jerky at low RPMS. at least for me any how

    if i tried to use the bucket off of the FEL (front end loader). i would end up having posts going in side ways and bent all out of place. more so sideways. and even with using the backhoe bucket i did bend a couple older T posts and put a couple in at an angle. say out of 30 posts 4 to 9 were either bent or at a slight angle. but for what i was doing i really could care less. due to the hot wire fence going on it. was / is only temporary. and if i bent a couple T posts it was no big deal. now if i was putting up mesh wire or a chain link fence. it might have been a completely different story. and may of pulled a couple T posts and re put them back in.

    ====================
    attach diagram. i would want the backhoe bucket version. then again. the ford 555c i am guessing weighs a lot more. and using a smaller size backhoe for say a small skid steer or sub compact / compact tractors may not work. due to just using pure weight to push posts down into the ground.

    and trying to drive say 4" wood posts may not even be possible for me. then again haven't tried yet. though T posts, ground rods, pipe i would like to think most backhoes would be able to do so. if the ground is half way soft. and not totaly hard compacted and not a lot of rock in the dirt.

    on a side note. driving posts tend to be much easier with 2 people. one at the controls and other grabing posts and making sure they are level. and with T posts and if you are putting up wire mesh. making sure the T posts are facing correct direction so the teeth on the T posts go towards the side the wire mesh is getting put on. the teeth help hold the wire mesh in place. vs relying on the 2 to 3 pieces of wire holding the mesh to the fence post. if you are putting up hot wire fence. you need to make sure the T posts are facing correct direction for the plastic insulators you want to use.

    sorry for last bit. but been there done that. and thinking why did i do that in the first place. as i look at a post i put into the ground.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails -post-driver-png  
    Ryan

  9. #19
    Silver Member zmansmac's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    154
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Tractor
    Kubota B7500

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    When I moved into my current house 9 years ago I needed to quickly fence in the back yard using T posts and TSC wire fencing. I went to the local rent-all place and one fellow told me he just uses the bucket on his tractor to pound them in. I didn't have a tractor at the time so we had this idea of using an electric hammer driver, the kind to break up cement. I brought in a T post and he welded a tube to fit it on the end of a broken bit. It worked pretty well to put in about 50 posts but I did have to get the tube rewelded a couple of times. A couple years later I got my B7500 and needed to put a few more posts in. The loader on my little B7500 didn't go high enough to pound them in and I knew how much effort it was to put them in by hand pounding. So I designed a simple device that fit on the back of my tractor and used a hydraulic cylinder to push them down. The device will only work with T posts but it will work no matter the length or how far you want to push them in. It has a releasing mechanism that allows the cylinder to go up and then catch the closest nub on the post when going down. You simply raise and lower the cylinder as many times as needed. Any size cylinder will work; the longer stroke will mean fewer ups and downs. Although it hasn't been a problem for me, but the nub side of the T post has to be facing rearward from the back of the tractor. If I hit a rock it will start to raise the rear end of my little tractor and I simply move over a little. I designed to be installed upside down as well. That way I can pull up a T post just as easy to remove them. Unfortunately, I never took any pictures of it and it is currently buried in the back of my shed behind mowing deck and other assorted stuff that doesn't come out til spring. But when that happens I'll be more than happy to post some pictures if anyone is interested.

    JohnZ
    B7500

  10. #20
    New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    10
    Tractor
    yes

    Default Re: Homemade Post Driver/Pounder

    i have no idea how to praise it. it's awesome fantastic and what not.

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