Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    Gold Member o2batsea's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    435
    Location
    Maryland
    Tractor
    Kioti DK45C 2005

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    We received one for $30k! $18k was the lowest quote.
    Highballing is how contractors say no thanks.
    Practicing the ancient oriental art of ren-ching.

  2. #12
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Posts
    15,198
    Location
    Tyler, Texas
    Tractor
    Several, all used and abused.

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    Quote Originally Posted by o2batsea View Post
    Highballing is how contractors say no thanks.
    I'm guilty of this. If a client seems like they are going to be annoying to work for, or the job has that, it's going to be a pain to do factor to it, I raise my rates to make it worthwhile to deal with the client or the problems I foresee with the job. Sometimes I'm the only one who even submits a bid and I get the job. Sometimes I never hear back from them. Since there is so much work in my area, I tend to be on the higher end of bids anyway and kind of pick and choose who I want to work for.

    Eddie

  3. #13
    Veteran Member JerryK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,328
    Location
    Vanderbilt, Michigan, USeh?
    Tractor
    Mahindra 5035, JD 2240, 420

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    If you 'need' 16' now, I'd pony up the bucks and go 32'..... Hard to have too much barn or too much tractor.

  4. #14
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    65
    Location
    Browns Valley, MN, USA

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    Quote Originally Posted by BuilderML View Post
    Hi dilligaf,
    You can get storage trusses that give you an open space in the middle. Usually 16' open in the middle. For a 16x36 addition 18k sound high especially with you doing the ground work.You would only need 9 trusses 24" o.c. and 5/8 plywood for the roof and you are good to go.
    For a hay loft, the load requirement is for "light storage" which in the International Building Code is a 125 psf (pounds per square foot) live load. This is really beyond the capacity of any affordable prefabricated wood roof truss.

  5. #15
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    65
    Location
    Browns Valley, MN, USA

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    Quote Originally Posted by BHD View Post
    I guess I am not understanding your problem

    jsut copy what is there and extend it, (you nearly going to have to leave your end wall is my guess, jsut take the door off) and may be open up the wall, (as it is most likely supporting the end of the building and roof,

    can you post some prictures of the existing building

    I seems to me like it would easy jsut to copy the construcion you have if it working, and extend I not under standing your needing of a beam, or where you want this beam,


    even if you do build a second building (that may be an avantage) if some thing catches fire, not the whole thing is in danger, (one reason old farms has so many little buildings spaced all over the place),
    Just copying the existing design is no guarantee of structural success. Pole buildings "work" due to the shear strength of the roof and wall sheathing. Depending upon the wind speed and wind exposure factor, by moving the endwall, it could cause one or the other of the endwalls of the new structure to become inadequate in being able to transfer windloads from the roof to the ground. Also, lumber values (especially those of Southern Yellow Pine) have been significantly lowered.

    IMHO - While the best solution is a new code conforming structure (which will be less expensive in the long run), if the insistence is in adding on, it would be prudent to hire a registered professional engineer to evaluate the existing building and design an adequate solution.

  6. #16
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    65
    Location
    Browns Valley, MN, USA

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    Quote Originally Posted by o2batsea View Post
    Highballing is how contractors say no thanks.
    In most cases, when a contractor adds onto an existing structure, he then becomes liable for the structural integrity of the entire building. From the contractor's standpoint, why take on the huge risk, unless their is also a huge reward?

  7. #17
    Veteran Member KennyG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,145
    Location
    SW Michigan
    Tractor
    John Deere 2320

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    Quote Originally Posted by PoleBarnGuru View Post
    Just copying the existing design is no guarantee of structural success. Pole buildings "work" due to the shear strength of the roof and wall sheathing. Depending upon the wind speed and wind exposure factor, by moving the endwall, it could cause one or the other of the endwalls of the new structure to become inadequate in being able to transfer windloads from the roof to the ground. Also, lumber values (especially those of Southern Yellow Pine) have been significantly lowered.

    IMHO - While the best solution is a new code conforming structure (which will be less expensive in the long run), if the insistence is in adding on, it would be prudent to hire a registered professional engineer to evaluate the existing building and design an adequate solution.
    While this is technically correct, I wouldn't overthink this one. Remember, the original building is not a truss structure, it's rafters on post walls, if I understand it. As long as the rafters are tied the building can be as long as it needs be. The end walls are not going to be a limitation on the building length. The post size/spacing and the rafter size/spacing should just follow standard timber tables.

    While I always appreciate people getting professional engineers involved (I am one), this case certainly doesn't seem to require it.

  8. #18
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,096
    Location
    easten Colorado
    Tractor
    JD 4020

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    going back to tieing in if the ridge beam goes thought the wall it is simple two steel plates with holes and a few bolts, (ply wood and nails would work as well, if necessary one can weld up a bracket that can bolt on the last set of rafters and then to support the ridged beam, (remove the siding if necessary), basically a T shaped unit with two pieces on the center to bolt to the beam, a beam hanger may work as well that one can buy at the lumber center
    on the (over hang) one can just cut the rafter ends out to clear the roof beam the closer the cut the better, or remove the over hang rafters,

    but like said the ridge is not actually a support , it is a convenience and makes putting up the rafters easier, as it supports them and gives a spacing and locater, (not that that is a bad thing in any way shape or form)

    many old buildings do not have ridge beams or boards, trusses don't have ridges beam/boards,

  9. #19
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,096
    Location
    easten Colorado
    Tractor
    JD 4020

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    Quote Originally Posted by PoleBarnGuru View Post
    Just copying the existing design is no guarantee of structural success. Pole buildings "work" due to the shear strength of the roof and wall sheathing.

    IMHO - While the best solution is a new code conforming structure (which will be less expensive in the long run), if the insistence is in adding on, it would be prudent to hire a registered professional engineer to evaluate the existing building and design an adequate solution.
    If the building is not sagging and has some age on it (proven) and no problems the existing method of building is not a SIN,

    My barn would not meet modern building code but it is as straight as the day it was built and has only stood over 105 years, I would not have any fear of copying it's design and or construction, ( know it has stood in over 85 mph winds that lasted for over 8 hrs, a number of near tornado), I am not saying do not build to code, but most likely the existing structure is a good design (from the picture it looks good).

    what I am saying you have a proven design copying it and constructing in like manor and similar materials I really doubt if you ever would have any problems, (unless the tornado takes the whole building), Put it this way the new part will stand as well as the old part if built the same, using equal or better materials,

    I have been building things for over 40 years some professionally (I ran my own construction company)and on my own place, and I will say from what i see that is a fairly well constructed building and it has a lot more than lumber and depth of structural members than most,

  10. #20
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    65
    Location
    Browns Valley, MN, USA

    Default Re: Extending pole barn help

    Quote Originally Posted by KennyG View Post
    While this is technically correct, I wouldn't overthink this one. Remember, the original building is not a truss structure, it's rafters on post walls, if I understand it. As long as the rafters are tied the building can be as long as it needs be. The end walls are not going to be a limitation on the building length. The post size/spacing and the rafter size/spacing should just follow standard timber tables.

    While I always appreciate people getting professional engineers involved (I am one), this case certainly doesn't seem to require it.
    When a trussed building or not, the framework is not stiff enough to be a rigid frame, therefore the shear loads are being transferred from the roof to the endwalls. It very well could be a problem. The column sizes need to be appropriate to be able to carry the combination of 1/2 snow plus wind. A simple table is not going to be able to adequately size the columns, and the roof diaphragm will need to be adequate to transfer the loads, else the columns should be designed as a pure cantilever (in which case it is going to take sidewall columns larger than 6x6).

    Pole buildings are remarkably complex structures, this is why I would recommend investing in the services of a professional.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Pole Barn vs Metal Barn....pros and cons?
    By markmc in forum Projects
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: 08-27-2014, 02:33 PM
  2. Pole Barn, Pole Question
    By HoustonBrama in forum Projects
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 07-27-2008, 05:15 PM
  3. And Yet another Horse Barn/ Pole Barn
    By FL4400 in forum Projects
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 05-05-2008, 06:39 PM
  4. pole barn pole problem..
    By mopower440 in forum Projects
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-15-2003, 06:35 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.