Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    383
    Location
    Michigan , usa
    Tractor
    John Deere

    Default Michigan 675 wheel loader project

    These photos show me on a Michigan 675 Wheel loader down by Grand Rapids , Mi. We drove down and spent 4 hours with the owner . He told us there are only three 675 loaders left in the world and only two of them still run. He also told us he bought and sold this machine three different times. We took plenty of pictures and I came home and built the model. That was a fun day with Russ. -aaamich1-jpg-aaamich2-jpg-aaamich3-jpg-aaamich4-jpg-aaamich5-jpg-aaamich6-jpg-aaamich8-jpg-aaamich9-jpg

  2. #2
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,294
    Location
    the Steernbos (Holland)
    Tractor
    Zetor 3011, Zetor 5718

  3. #3
    Platinum Member DeereMann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    806
    Location
    Oak Grove, MN
    Tractor
    John Deere 1026R

    Default Re: Michigan 675 wheel loader project

    WOW!!!

    Whatever became of Michigan construction equipment?
    DeereMann
    John Deere 1026R
    John Deere 445 (sold)
    John Deere 318 (sold)
    John Deere STX38 (sold)

    Stihl 018, 026, MS460

  4. #4
    Platinum Member herringchoker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    665
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Tractor
    Kubota B7800, Case 450

    Default Re: Michigan 675 wheel loader project

    The wheel loaders got bought out by Volvo, most everything else was dropped by that time.

    Clark Michigan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    And Waldon52, your craftsmanship never ceases to amaze me.
    Kubota B7800, LA402 FEL, Homemade cab, 60" bushcutter, 74" rear snowblower.
    Kubota RTV500.
    Case 450 c/w 6-way dozer.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member ericher69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,611
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Tractor
    2008 Kubota b2920

    Default

    Looks like those front tires where too soft or not enough rear ballast.

    Walon thx for sharing. Did you get to operate the Michigan?

    Great replica,
    ericher69
    IAFF Local 849

  6. #6
    Veteran Member ericher69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,611
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Tractor
    2008 Kubota b2920

    Default

    Watching those old videos is great; a time where people not machines made things and humans knew how to troubleshoot!

    Watching the welding procedures I was surprised there was no joint prep (bevelling) as they just butted up and burned away.

    Maybe Shield Arc/Welder Mike/arc Weld can enlighten use as these where 3" plates.
    ericher69
    IAFF Local 849

  7. #7
    Platinum Member DeereMann's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    806
    Location
    Oak Grove, MN
    Tractor
    John Deere 1026R

    Default Re: Michigan 675 wheel loader project

    Thanks for the link, herringchoker.

    That is a sad read - how insufficient investment & unfair competition wrecked a great American company. Way too common of a story now.
    DeereMann
    John Deere 1026R
    John Deere 445 (sold)
    John Deere 318 (sold)
    John Deere STX38 (sold)

    Stihl 018, 026, MS460

  8. #8
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    1,458
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Tractor
    MF 135

    Default Re: Michigan 675 wheel loader project

    The tires were the biggest problem on the 675 because it was so heavy. I used to have a brochure on the Michigan C series loaders. What's interesting is that it listed the 675C model as the offering the biggest bite on wheels with buckets up to 36 cubic yards(for coal loading) but 24 yd was standard. 16 675's are listed as being built but that's a deceiving number. 2 675B's were bought back by Clark and rebuilt and sold as the C models. The prototype used 2 GM engines but had a lot of problems so they switched to 2 Cummins engines. I knew a guy that bought a 175B new and he said you couldn't hurt it! He also had a 75B and it wasn't as strong but he probably tried to do the same work with it as the 175. Michigan's are known as one of the best loaders ever made. Those old videos are fantastic!

    As far as the welding, almost all of it designed for fillet welds so it doesn't need as much prep. I would also bet a lot of the steel is thicker to not only give rigidity but also give a good safety/abuse factor without needing to use 3" fillet welds. I would think there was some preheating required and the video showed them using a hand held sub-arc gun with the flux pouring over the weld. The safety police would have had a field day there, welding without gloves, no safety glasses, etc. I'd like to see how they build/form the huge buckets.
    Last edited by Arc weld; 12-24-2013 at 08:38 PM.

  9. #9
    Veteran Member ericher69's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    1,611
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Tractor
    2008 Kubota b2920

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Arc weld View Post
    The tires were the biggest problem on the 675 because it was so heavy. I used to have a brochure on the Michigan C series loaders. What's interesting is that it listed the 675C model as the offering the biggest bite on wheels with buckets up to 36 cubic yards(for coal loading) but 24 yd was standard. 16 675's are listed as being built but that's a deceiving number. 2 675B's were bought back by Clark and rebuilt and sold as the C models. The prototype used 2 GM engines but had a lot of problems so they switched to 2 Cummins engines. I knew a guy that bought a 175B new and he said you couldn't hurt it! He also had a 75B and it wasn't as strong but he probably tried to do the same work with it as the 175. Michigan's are known as one of the best loaders ever made. Those old videos are fantastic! As far as the welding, almost all of it designed for fillet welds so it doesn't need as much prep. I would also bet a lot of the steel is thicker to not only give rigidity but also give a good safety/abuse factor without needing to use 3" fillet welds. I would think there was some preheating required and the video showed them using a hand held sub-arc gun with the flux pouring over the weld. The safety police would have had a field day there, welding without gloves, no safety glasses, etc. I'd like to see how they build/form the huge buckets.
    Thank you for the explanation and reasoning behind the build design.
    ericher69
    IAFF Local 849

  10. #10
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,294
    Location
    the Steernbos (Holland)
    Tractor
    Zetor 3011, Zetor 5718

    Default Re: Michigan 675 wheel loader project

    Quote Originally Posted by Arc weld View Post
    The tires were the biggest problem on the 675 because it was so heavy.
    These were dumptruck tires, normally used in duals, because nothing else was available.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. need some help with Michigan 55-3A Wheel loader
    By deiceman49 in forum Construction Equipment
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10-29-2012, 01:59 PM
  2. Michigan 55 loader with frozen brakes
    By deiceman49 in forum Parts/Repairs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-08-2012, 07:34 PM
  3. MICHIGAN 85A LOADER TRANS TROUBLE?
    By marraboola in forum Construction Equipment
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-21-2012, 12:39 PM
  4. 1958 Clark Michigan Loader
    By plowking in forum Owning/Operating
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-12-2008, 09:41 PM
  5. Michigan Wheel Loader
    By joebleaux in forum Construction Equipment
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-28-2006, 10:56 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.