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  1. #1
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    Default pole barn designing 40x64ish

    I am in the design phases of my next polebarn that I will likely start in the spring. Called a few places for quotes, and still waiting to hear back from some, bit so far it looks like I will be doing it myself to save some money. I was having them quote just a 40x64 shell, with one gable end left open. So just setting posts, trusses, and 3sides, labor alone was $6k on the cheapest quote.

    So, have been doing some research and come up with more questions than answers.

    1. Truss spacing. 4', 8',9', etc. It seems a lot of "kits"are using 9' oc posts and trusses. Seems like a waste of lumber using 10' girts and purlins just so the siding works out. What am I missing?

    Other than that, the whole 4' vs 8' debate. I like the idea of 8' with a truss over each post and no need for a large header board. But on the other hand, I don't like purlins on end, and the larger spacing inside for liner panels and insulation.

    2. Posts. Probably going 12' walls. 6x6 posts or 3 2x6's? Everyone says the laminated is stronger, and they are cheaper too.

    3. Wall girts. I have always just nailed 2x4's on the outside and worried about finishing the inside later. But seen something different when searching. Using 2x6's laid flat in between the posts. Preps both the inside and outside at the same time. Of course it means you have to drill for wiring, but I liked the clean look and seems easier/quicker/cheaper. Has anyone done this?

    4. Building size. The 40x64 isn't set in stone. Basically I am looking for something in the 2500sq ft range and looking to do it as economically as possible. Am considering 36x72 just because that works out well with 8' spacing and lumber on the sides and 12' on the ends and both directions work out well with 3'siding. (Makes no sense to me why siding is not 4' like all other sheathing?) Haven't figured cost yet, but if its cheaper, I'll go 36x72 vs 40x64. Or any other suggestions or compelling reasons to go a different size I am all ears.

    Let's hear some thoughts. And pictures are always welcome.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    Have you given thought to the prospect of getting 24'+ roof tins (depending on pitch and overhang) up on the roof?

    Those trusses won't bring much joy, either.


    That's my first thought.
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  3. #3
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    Six grand for labor doesn't sound too bad. Figure six guys working all week to get it done and they make a grand each for the week. Probably do it faster, but it's still not a bad price.

    1. Metal comes in 3ft widths. I've never seen the 9ft spacing for posts, but my guess is it has something to do with the width of the metal. I like 8 foot spacing myself. Then I can go 16ft with my purlins and alternate posts where they end.

    I like the large header board. It's not just nice for carrying the load of the truss that's resting on it, it also does a great job of holding the top of the posts together.

    2. The debate over what to use with posts has to start with making sure you are comparing the same pressure treatment ratings. 6x6's have a higher level of treatment for in ground contact with soil. Standard treated 2x6s are only rated for above ground use and not to be on or in the soil. I've never seen treated 2x6's with the same rating as a 6x6 but others on here have said they have been able to find them. The strength comparison is a moot point. Both are more then strong enough for the job and you're really just debating on how much overkill you are getting. The advantage to using the 2x6 method is you don't have to cut and notch the posts. For some, that's faster and easier for them. I'm guessing they are not used to doing that type of work and just cutting that 2x6 before laminating it to the other boards is a lot easier for them.

    3. I agree that framing out the walls with 2x6's give you a much cleaner and nicer finish. The only concern is that you have to have support under that wall. I'd pour a concrete footing, but I have seen where they lay a treated 6x6 on the dirt and use that as the footing under the sill plate.

    4. The cost of the trusses and getting them into place is probably the biggest issue with making it wider over making it longer. Same thing goes with spacing them. At 4ft, you need a lot of trusses, but at 8 or 12 feet, you save a bunch of money on trusses but then you have to go to purlins on edge for you roof. I like mine at 4 feet, but there is no best way, just what you prefer and you are willing to spend.

    If you are planning on leaving one end wide open, you really need to take into account how weak that will make the building. Corners are everything in a building and not having those two corners makes me very nervous. I wouldn't build a building like that. Given the size of your span, I would want at least 8 feet of wall on each side of your opening and I would make sure to have some OSB or plywood there for sheer strength under the metal. While metal is fine in most applications, this is pushing it's limits and not enough in my opinion to keep the building stable.

    Your best bet would be to either have a wall inside the building at that open end and leave the open end big enough for what you need it for, or put in several large doors.

    Good luck,
    Eddie

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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    If you have strong prevailing winds in a certain direction, you may want to turn the open end away from that direction.

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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    So far my favorite shop size is 40 wide and multiples of 24 long... so 40 by 48 or 40 x 72 or 40 x 96 with one large gable end roll up door and roll up doors in each 24 long section.

    Having a center isle with a large gable door in theory means not having to move any equipment to get something out and only having to to open one door...

  6. #6
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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    Menards has GC rated 2x6 lumber. If the link works, here it is http://www.menards.com/main/deckesti...87-c-13134.htm

    I really have no preference as to posts or laminated, just that laminated would be about 1/2 of what 6x6 posts would cost. Especially since we are talking 16-18' posts, and even more on the gables.

    As to the trusses, I will likely go 4' OC w/posts on 8', or even 5' OC and posts on 10. I think 8' will be too much for adding liner panel and insulation in the ceiling. 2x12's are pricey and heavy. Was trying to save some $$$ and avoid having to lug them 14' in the air.

    If all the quotes come back at $6k+, I will build myself. I certainly wouldnt think it would take 6 guys a whole week, but I could be wrong. I was thinking 4 guys and 2-3 days??

    And to clarify, I have no intention of leaving a gable end open. It will have a 16' door, a 10' door, and a man door. But I will do that myself. Along with insulation, concrete, wiring, etc etc. Was just shopping for a crew to come in and knock out the structure rather quickly so I can have a roof and start storing stuff again.

    Also considering the composite grade-board. It has the rat-guard built in. Anyone use this stuff http://www.menards.com/main/building...334-c-5713.htm

    It would rule out doing the 2x6 walls flush, but looks like neat stuff.
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  7. #7
    Super Star Member EddieWalker's Avatar
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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    Three of those 2x6's are going to cost you $57 plus two tubes of liquid nails and the cost of nails or screws to get them tight enough together for the glue to set up. One 6x6 is $54 http://www.menards.com/main/building...66-c-13131.htm

    Eddie

  8. #8
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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    The 2x6x18 GC rated is ~$16. I would only need 1. Cut down in staggering joints just to get above ground.

    Something like 4'-6'-8'. Then from there up to the 14' high wall, I would need 14', 12', and 10' NON-treated 2x6's. Those cost $6.42, $7.42, and $8.98. For a total of ~$39 for a post that totals 18'

    IF I only needed 16' posts, I could used non reated 12', 10', and 8', which would save about $4 for $35 each post. The 18' 6x6's are $65. So it would save me $25 each post. The 16' lengths would save me $10 or better each post. And the long posts on the gable ends would save even more. So if I go 14' high, it could save over $500.

    But the concept is new to me. IF I decide to go laminated posts, I do need more research. But I havent seen anywhere that anyone has mentioned gluing them together? I was wondering about that. Anyone who has the laminated style of posts....do you know if they were screwed and glued or just nailed?
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    After five pole barns I can tell you to build bigger than you want. 40 x 60 would be a minimum and if you must build that size put an overhang on the east side.

    Two big doors...one on a gable end and one about 60% of the way back on one side. Barn 14 ft high.

    Just my two cents.
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  10. #10
    Super Star Member LD1's Avatar
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    Default Re: pole barn designing 40x64ish

    Moving out of a 30x50. So either 40x64 or 36x72 or similar will add ~1000sq ft. And really all the bigger I have money to do right now. And truss prices jump pretty good once you start going north of 40'. So cost vs sq ft starts to go the wrong way.

    12' is my minimum. But planning on 14' at the moment. Also planning on many doors.

    As it is now, the plan is to build a wall somewhere around 36-40' deep into the building. Giving me somewhere between a 36x36-40x40 workshop that will be heated, insulated, conreted, etc etc. And planning on a 16x8 overhead door and 10x12 door, and a man door on the gable end that I was quoting to be left open. Then beyond the wall, another 24-36' (just depends on how I build and what size), will be sorage for the tractor, backhoe, implements, etc. Stuff that dont need to live on concrete and in the heat all the time. And planning on 2 doors on the eave ends across from each other. 12' wide and 12-14' high sliders.

    Edit: And 5 barns...did you build them yourself? you hire it done? IF you hired, what builder(s) did you use?
    ".........there is only one way to find out."
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