Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,132
    Location
    Richfield, Wi
    Tractor
    Resident Architect

    Default universal joint question

    I'm working on a drive line to power a snowblower. I just realized that I'm facing some severe drive shaft angles. The angles are definetly beyond the capacity of a single U joint. I've seen some double U joints used but have little experience with them. Can I have a double U joint at BOTH ends of a driveshaft? All the applications that I can think of only have the double U joint at one end and then a single cross at the other.

  2. #2
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    19,393
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: universal joint question


    If you are building it yourself can you use the CV joint from a vehicle.

    Egon [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  3. #3
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    13,736
    Location
    Upper Midwest USA
    Tractor
    JD_4x2_Gator, JD_4300, JD_X485, JD_425, JD_455, JD_110

    Default Re: universal joint question

    Maybe some belt or chain transfer to get the offset you need.

    What angle are you trying to get to transfer the drive power?

  4. #4
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    3,373
    Location
    Goffs Corner, KY
    Tractor
    IH 2444

    Default Re: universal joint question

    You might need a carrier bearing in the middle with a double joint on both ends. Not sure, I have never done that though. But it seems that the middle might have too much wobble.

    Ben

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,132
    Location
    Richfield, Wi
    Tractor
    Resident Architect

    Default Re: universal joint question

    Yes, I'm toying with the idea of using a automotive CV joint. The problem is trying to adapt one to a ag drive line. Most of these CV joints have funky ends specific to the vehicle.

    The chain would be the perfect solution, but the attachment swings in an arc so the pulleys would never be aligned. Otherwise it would be the perfect solution. I'm going to ballpark some angles tonight.

    My research shows that you would need a center bearing if you used a double universal joint. There is a "Carden" constant velocity joint that is capable of locating the knuckle so the shaft doesn't need to be supported. I'm still trying to get some pricing on the unit, but they sound pretty expensive. Several hundred for each assembly and I need two of them.

    Somehow I may need to adapt those auto CV joints...

  6. #6
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    2,874
    Location
    Iuka Mississippi USA
    Tractor
    3550 Fard Backhoe and a 1948 Farmall Cub,

    Default Re: universal joint question

    Cord Ive adapted a few cv joints to pto shfting before its not too hard, theres several ways most of the time adpters can be found at ag shops. If you want a heavyduty one get one off an old Eldorado Ive got a few on hay bailers and pull type combines Ive fixed for neighbors.

  7. #7
    Super Star Member Egon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    19,393
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada

    Default Re: universal joint question


    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( funky ends specific to the vehicle )</font>

    Might have to do some welding to the proper ends.

    Egon [img]/forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Super Star Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    13,736
    Location
    Upper Midwest USA
    Tractor
    JD_4x2_Gator, JD_4300, JD_X485, JD_425, JD_455, JD_110

    Default Re: universal joint question

    </font><font color="blue" class="small">( The chain would be the perfect solution, but the attachment swings in an arc so the pulleys would never be aligned. )</font>

    The 'arc' you speak of is the raising and lowering of the snowblower? There isn't a need to also angle the blower is there?
    Seems a telescoping drive shaft is what is needed with simple u-joints on each end. But I don't know exactly what limitations you are faced with, I admit. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

  9. #9
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    375
    Location
    Near Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Tractor
    John Deere 990 4x4

    Default Re: universal joint question

    Here's an idea, just for the sake of brainstorming.

    How about a hydraulic drive system. A pump on the PTO and motor on the snowblower. The hoses in between are about the most flexible driveline you are likely to ever get. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif[/img]

    I don't know what the availability of surplus hydraulics is like in your area, but if you can find a source, you might be able to find a suitable pump and motor as cheap or cheaper than those fancy driveshafts you mentioned. You'd need to choose pump and motor displacements appropriately to get the blower going the right speed, and of course choose parts rated for the power you'll be transferring through them.

    Good luck whatever method you use ...
    [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]

  10. #10
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,132
    Location
    Richfield, Wi
    Tractor
    Resident Architect

    Default Re: universal joint question

    Well, I measured the angles tonight. 20 degrees on both ends. That's well beyond the capability of a regular U-joint.

    Hydraulics would be the perfect solution. Unfortinatly they are horribly inefficent. The best pumps are 80% efficent. The best motors are 80% efficent. That's a bunch of hp lost and I don't have any to spare. Great suggestion though!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2016 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.