Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22
  1. #1
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default New Tractor Ahead

    Hello Everyone.

    We have recently purchased a house on 32 acres in East Tennessee (20 in pasture, the rest steeply wooded), and it seems we need a tractor. [img]/w3tcompact/icons/tongue.gif[/img]

    I've never purchased a tractor before (lawn tractor aside), so I'm a neophyte at this business, but I've learned a tremendous amount by reading the posts on this board. I now feel fairly confident that I will make the right decision when purchase time comes. In the meantime, however, I hope to learn more by asking a few questions of the knowledgeable folks who post here, so here goes.

    1. What's the best way to decide on how wide an implement should be, a box blade for example?

    2. I gather that heavier weight implements tend to be of higher quality, and in some cases perform better. True?

    3. Lots of people reverse the wheels of their tractors. I plan to do the same. What are the negatives?

    4. What brand of FEL do you recommend?

    5. Rotary cutters seemed to have two HP ratings: Tractor HP and Gearbox HP. Am I correcting in assuming that gearbox HP is the maximum power that the cutter can handle without grenading itself?

    6. Remotes are an option on some makes and standard on others. How important are they, and if springing for them as an option, is it worth it to go to dual remotes?

    7. How are tractors titled, or are they? Does a new tractor come with something like a certificate of origin as motor vehicles and trailers do?

    8. What's the customary deposit when ordering a tractor? 10%, 20%...?

    9. Anyone in the Tennessee Valley care to comment on R1 versus R4 for the hilly conditions around here?

    10. My current thinking is a 35hp 4wd tractor with FEL, box blade, bush hog, and auger to start. Work will be pasture clipping, constructing swales, driveway and trail grading, pond maintenance, some fence work, and general dirt moving. Any comments?

    Thanks, SnowRidge

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    873
    Location
    N Central Ohio
    Tractor
    NH TC35D/SUPER H&M/F-20/JD B&D/FORDSON/JD250 SSL

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    The NH TC 35D or 40D are nice tractors,
    they are on the large frame which gives
    a 2000# loader rating.
    The box blade should be wider than tires,
    this size tractors can go 6' or 7'.
    W/ box blade dual remotes can use the top-n-tilt
    (2 cylinders that adjust side to sideangle and
    front to back level to allow cutting or to cut
    swales or ect).
    The factory NH loaders are nice and come w/
    SSL quik-tach so forks,grapple bucket,or different
    buckets can be changed fast.
    Most SSL companies make a HPD that will go
    on FEL so easier to see what u are doing.
    Northern Hyd. has a HPD that bolts onto
    bucket also.
    Both of the mower HP ratings should be above
    the tractor HP, the higher HP mowers are built
    stonger and could give more life.
    Some tractors have more PTO HP than
    others w/ same engine HP (hydro lose more
    PTO HP than gear drive) .
    Wider tires settings give more stability but
    also need wider tools to cover tire tracks.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    874
    Location
    Monroe,Washington
    Tractor
    New holland TC29-9x3 Woods 1012 FEL, Woods, 7500 Backhoe / Kubota L345DT 4WD, Kub FEL, Kub Backhoe

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    SnowRidge Wecome toTBN:

    If you read my reply in the "New To Tractors" thread that I posted earlier today you will get a good veiw of my opinions on buying a compact tractor for an acreage owner. I only have three acres myself but do a lot of commercial mowing, landscape and excavation work for the surrounding area. And I use a New Holland TC29 (midsize frame) equipped with a Woods 1012 loader and a Woods 7500 backhoe. For my operation this is exactly the size I need as it affords better maneauverability than most of the higher horsepower models. Basicly the only limiting factor that I have to deal with is it only has enough pto horsepower (25) to operate a 5ft bushhog and a 6ft would be nice. And it will only power a 5ft rototiller, but that is fine. I also pull a 6ft rear discharge 3pt. finish mower with no problems.

    Basicly on implement width I shoot for what extends beyond the width of my rear tires, and the limiting factors of power versus traction. That way my tire tracks are covered up by the pass of the implement. The rear tires on my TC29 are @ 5ft wide, therefore I am running a 6ft boxblade. however if I allow the BB to completely fill with dirt the weight will quickly overcome my ability to apply traction to the ground. If its an implement that angles such as a rear blade or landscape rake I shoot for a size that extends to the outside of my rear tires when at maximum angle. Therefore I am running 7ft rear blade and Landscape rake.

    In reguards to implement weight. It definetly helps ground engaging implements dig better, as they cut in, instead of floating over the top of the ground. As for quality thats just common sense.

    There has been some talk that reversing your front wheels have caused extra strain on front spindles and bearings. I had an older kubota that went through two sets in twentytwo years of service. Yes the wheels were reversed. But with the heavy loader work that tractor saw constantly they might have gone out anyway. positive side is more stability and traction.

    Most of the manufacturers provide decent loaders badged under their names. And most people seem to purchase the loader designated for that tractor model by the tractor manufacturer. I for one went to an aftermarket loader manufacturer simply because I needed a higher max lifting capacity than New Holland offered. There are some very good aftermarket loaders out there. Woods and Allied/Buehler both make good ones. As well as others. One peice of advice no matter who's loader you purchase, buy a heavy duty bucket for it, and you will probably only have to do it once.

    The HP rating designated by the manufacturer of the rotary cutter is the max PTO HP that the gear box is designed to hold up to. While tractors are advertised in gross engine HP, and max HP at the PTO

    One set of rear remotes allows you to operate one hydraulic cicuit through its own valve. One set of remotes is nice, two sets even nicer if you are going to have the need to operate two seperate functions at the same time. I for one have one set for the rear and the second set plumbed for operating an extra function off the loader arms, such as angling a snowplow or hydr. auger. They are not cheap, so if you want them I would purchase them at the time of purchase.

    Not sure how the tractor is titled ??? wil have to check with the bookkeeper.

    Most dealers I know ask for a 10% deposit minimum.

    Local dealers can tell you which tires most customers take out the door.

    Hope this helps you. I see you already have a good idea of what you need to start out with. Good luck with your new tractor.






  4. #4
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    4,455
    Location
    Road 4310
    Tractor
    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    Rotary cutters hp ratings are:

    Tractor HP: The very minimun HP tractor to effectively use the cutter.

    Gearbox HP: Yiu said it best. Maximum HP before destruction

    Both might be fudged a little, but it sure would be better to stay qithin them. And actually, the number SAYS HP but may also mean Weight. A light weight tractor might get thrown around by the same cutter that a heavier tractor of the same HP can handle effortlessly.

  5. #5
    Elite Member rockyridgefarm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    4,455
    Location
    Road 4310
    Tractor
    Deere 4310 HST MFWD

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    <font color=blue>Most SSL companies make a HPD that will go
    on FEL so easier to see what u are doing.</font color=blue>

    Assuming you have half a clue as to WHAT a HPD is...[img]/w3tcompact/icons/grin.gif[/img]

    What is it?

  6. #6
    Epic Contributor Bird's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2000
    Posts
    36,984
    Location
    Texas

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    Snowridge, you've already gotten good answers, but I'll throw my 2 cents worth in (in many cases we're talking about personal preference and opinion, of course, and to a great extent, I'll just be repeating what others have already said):

    1. I want implements slightly wider than the overall width of the tractor - outside rear tires, and it greatly simplifies things if all implements are the same width; i.e., the same width as the bucket on the front end loader.

    2. Usually true.

    3. Be sure to check with the dealer/manufacturer/manual; some tractors are designed to reverse the wheels and some are definitely not.

    4. I want the FEL to be the same brand as the tractor; only one dealer/manufacturer to deal with in the unlikely event of a problem, it'll be designed to work with that particular tractor, it will "look" like it belongs there, and resale will likely be better in the future.

    5. Tractor HP = minimum you need to use it effectively.
    Gearbox HP = maximum you can use without risking damage to the gearbox.

    6. Well worth the cost to get the dual remotes; you'll find many uses for them.

    7. I think that may depend on your state laws; no title in my state; just a bill of sale.

    8. I think 20% is most common, but I also think it just depends on your credit rating.

    9. Well, I'm not in the Tennessee Valley (but I've been there); I'd go with R1 for maximum traction unless you have a specific need for another type.

    10. Sounds like the right set-up to me, and when you start using that box blade, you'll find hydraulic top 'n tilt to be indispensable, and that's when you'll want those dual remotes.

    Beautiful country you're in; good luck with the tractor shopping.

  7. #7
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    2,385
    Location
    Michigan
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40D Supersteer

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    I believe that HPD was meant to be PHD (post hole digger). These can be Skidsteer plate mounted with QuikAttach, or mounted on the side of a FEL bucket. The problem with the Skidsteer plate mounting is that it is difficult to see the auger working because the hood of the tractor is in the way. <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.danuser.com/products/hydraulic_diggers/hydraulic_diggers.htm>Danuser Mfg.</A> suggests that CUTs use the bucket mount (rather than the QuikAttach mount) for that reason.

  8. #8
    New Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    0

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    Hi,

    I got a lot of good advice on the tractor title question when I asked:

    Should I title my tractor?</font color=blue>

    Click the above link for all the details[img]/w3tcompact/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    Ended up settling for the certificate of origin...

    Bill in Pgh, PA

  9. #9
    Super Member
    Rest in Peace
    frank_f15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    6,033
    Location
    BUFFALO ,NEW YORK AREA
    Tractor
    kubota b2400- R4 tires

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    WELCOME TO THE FORUM; just tell u to re-read KODIAK"S post he pretty much says it all

  10. #10
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Posts
    46,372
    Location
    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: New Tractor Ahead

    Answers are interlaced.

    1. What's the best way to decide on how wide an implement should be, a box blade for example?

    Many people choose an impliment that will cover the tracks of the rear wheels.

    2. I gather that heavier weight implements tend to be of higher quality, and in some cases perform better. True?

    Generally. For instance, I have seen very light box blades bowed back, when they snagged on a root. ( I'm shure it jolted the heck outta the tractor too! ).

    However, remember that the more weight your impliment is, the less weight you have available for payload or pulling ( dirt scoop or trailer ). Though this becomes less important as you move into the mid size tractors with 3pt capacities in the 2k# range.
    Also, lotsa weight on the rear may neccisitate some weight on the front to ballance out.

    3. Lots of people reverse the wheels of their tractors. I plan to do the same. What are the negatives?

    Wider footprint? less maneuverable? I think the benefits much outweight the negatives, unless you are on a size
    constraint.


    5. Rotary cutters seemed to have two HP ratings: Tractor HP and Gearbox HP. Am I correcting in assuming that gearbox HP is the maximum power that the cutter can handle without grenading itself?

    Yes, one is hp ( range ) needed to operate the cutter, the other is the hp it is rated to handle.

    6. Remotes are an option on some makes and standard on others. How important are they, and if springing for them as an option, is it worth it to go to dual remotes?

    Do you plan on running external hydraulic cylinders? If so, the are important.. if not.. then....

    Some tractors have a hydraulic manifold for plumbing in external hydraulics at a later time. For instance, my NH 1920 has it, and I have seen many more.
    If you don't get the remotes, you may want to at least considder a tractor with this option so you can easilly add the remotes later.

    7. How are tractors titled, or are they? Does a new tractor come with something like a certificate of origin as motor vehicles and trailers do?

    I have heard that in some cities / states you can register a tractor like a car.. but the general consensus is 'no'.



    8. What's the customary deposit when ordering a tractor? 10%, 20%...?

    Hafta ask the dealer on that one.. for reference though, I put 10% on mine to hold it till I came back with financing.


    10. My current thinking is a 35hp 4wd tractor with FEL, box blade, bush hog, and auger to start. Work will be pasture clipping, constructing swales, driveway and trail grading, pond maintenance, some fence work, and general dirt moving. Any comments?

    Sounds like a nice machine. Though your front end loader will probably do the largest share o f the work,, we 'loader-less' people get lotsa work from a boxblade.. very usefull impliment, probably a close 2nd to the loader for general purpose work.

    Good luck!

    Soundguy


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2013 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.