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  1. #21
    Veteran Member
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    Sep 2009
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    1,614
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    The County, ME
    Tractor
    Kubota M5640SUD

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Quote Originally Posted by flusher View Post
    That MF135 diesel has a basic gear drive tranny 6F/2R with multipower-a hydraulic setup that gives you two more ranges for a total of 12F/4R.

    Roundish gear boxes? Are you referring to the bull gears that are used on the rear axles of some high crop tractors--like the 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF tractor that I'm restoring now?

    Attachment 227452Attachment 227453Attachment 227454

    If so, the answer is no--my 135 is a standard field tractor without bull gears like a high crop. No modifications were made to the rear axle. The original owner replaced the 28" dia rims that you generally find on the rears of field tractors with 16" dia rims carrying Goodrich 6-ply 18.4-16A rubber. He used shortened spindles on the front axle to keep the tractor level. He used it mainly for mowing and discing his olive orchard, essentially converting a field tractor into a low-squat, high-floatation orchard tractor. BTW--this is a simple way to modify a field tractor for mowing steep slopes. The 18" wide rears are used on a variety of big ag equipment (swathers, combines, etc) and are readily available at places that sell ag tires, like Les Schwab out here on the West Coast.
    Interesting points about gaining more stability for work on sloping ground. Thanks.

  2. #22
    Super Star Member brin's Avatar
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    Jul 2009
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    10,713
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    Georgia - Mt. Vernon by The Store just 5 miles east and right by the big oak tree then to the creek.

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Quote Originally Posted by keegs View Post
    That's in the plan. I've been working with a retired farmer/logger on projects around the place who I think doesn't own anything built prior to the mid-sixties. From what I've gathered from conversations, he knows his way around farm equipment.
    Oh then you are fine...you will find yourself a great tractor, just be patient for the right one and when it surfaces go get it...don't delay or someone will beat you to it. I bought several over the years and I would litterally stop what I was doing as soon as I heard about or read and ad about it and go see it..even then sometimes others beat me to it...and some were wasted trips to look at junk...but that is part of the process...You will get a good one with your retired friend helping you with his experience...
    Bob

    WORRYING does not take away tomorrow's TROUBLES, it takes away today's PEACE.


    NH - TC-29 , FEL, Bush hog, Bush hog brand finishing mower, Post hole digger, 6' Back blade, sub-soiler, Pallet forks, 20KW PTO Generator , 21 hp Murray Mower
    JD -3020 with FEL and a 16 HP. K-Grow Lawn Tractor (bought from K Mart 1994) and runs great !
    Clark 130 EN Mig Welder

  3. #23
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
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    4,144
    Location
    New Brunswick, Canada
    Tractor
    Kubota L5030 HSTC, MF 5455

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Well maintained old tractors are reliable. Keep water out of the fuel tank and maintain them and they go a long time. Battery dead? Roll start it. Don't need any of the electrics on most oldies.

    I've got newish tractors myself to have nice cabs but not afraid of older stuff. Grew up on it. Hours aren't a big issue and don't be fooled by fresh paint. Get someone to check it out well.

  4. #24
    Veteran Member
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    Sep 2009
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    1,614
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    The County, ME
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    Kubota M5640SUD

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Quote Originally Posted by brin View Post
    Oh then you are fine...you will find yourself a great tractor, just be patient for the right one and when it surfaces go get it...don't delay or someone will beat you to it. I bought several over the years and I would litterally stop what I was doing as soon as I heard about or read and ad about it and go see it..even then sometimes others beat me to it...and some were wasted trips to look at junk...but that is part of the process...You will get a good one with your retired friend helping you with his experience...
    Yeah...sometimes the hunt can be allot of fun.

  5. #25
    Epic Contributor Soundguy's Avatar
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    Mar 2002
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    47,662
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    Central florida
    Tractor
    ym1700, NH7610S, Ford 8N, 2N, NAA, 660, 850 x2, 541, 950, 941D, 951, 2000, 3000, 4000, 4600, 5000, 740, IH 'C' 'H', CUB, John Deere 'B', allis 'G', case VAC

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Quote Originally Posted by brin View Post
    Oh then you are fine...you will find yourself a great tractor, just be patient for the right one and when it surfaces go get it...don't delay or someone will beat you to it. I bought several over the years and I would litterally stop what I was doing as soon as I heard about or read and ad about it and go see it..even then sometimes others beat me to it...and some were wasted trips to look at junk...but that is part of the process...You will get a good one with your retired friend helping you with his experience...
    Excelent advice right there!

    To the OP.. this is good info.

    don't get into a rush.. look around.. I can tell you that unless you get real lucky, you will likely look at a few trctors before you see one that fits your needs.

    when you do see that one.. get it.

    I can't tell you how many times I stopped and looked at a great deal and said..wow.. i'll come get that this weekend, only to have it gone the next day.

    it's to the point now that when i see something i like.. if I can I put a down payment on it or some other means to hold it, and if possible.. just buy it then and go get a trailer and lunch just to get it into my posession.. etc.

    soundguy

  6. #26
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    350
    Location
    DSM IA USA 50310
    Tractor
    Kubota Bx-23

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Hi: My only comment would be to avoid older tricycle front ends ie get wide fronts for slopes pr

    It costs a lot to feed a dinosaur.
    Never trust a computer you can pick up.

  7. #27
    Super Member flusher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    6,425
    Location
    Northern California-Tehama Co.
    Tractor
    2008 Mahindra 5525, 1964 MF-135 diesel, 1951 Farmall Super A, 1951 Minneapolis Moline BF, 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop, 1949 JD B widefront

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Quote Originally Posted by My Hoe View Post
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    And I've heard that BRAKE REPLACEMENT can be a hassle on some models, something HST owners probably wouldn't think about, not having to use them much (or at all?)?

    I hope my questions are helpful to the OP--and I hope I was clear enough that someone can answer them! LOL

    My Hoe
    Brake replacement hassle? Yes and no. It's not that bad. Here are the brakes on that MM BF tractor (the yellow and red one). They're under the red shop towels in the photos. You can do a complete brake job without removing the rear wheels. During the restoration, I did the brakes on the workbench after I removed the rear axles--easier that way.

    -dscf0088-small-jpg-dscf0091-small-jpg-dscf0016-small-jpg-dscf0066-small-jpg

    My 1945 Oliver 60 Row Crop has a different arrangement but the brakes can still be replaced without removing the rear wheels. The brakes are attached to the shaft in the differential that carries the small gears that drive the bull gears on the rear axles. You just remove those round covers ahead of the rear axles and you can do the brake job sitting on your butt.

    -dscf0052-small-jpg-img_0434-small-jpg-img_0435-small-jpg-img_0626-small-jpg

    I bought that Ollie last Jan, it runs fine, has a parade ready paint job and only cost $2250. However, the right brake lining was completely gone and the left lining was soaked with gear oil. Had to replace the two shaft seals behind the drums and reline the brake bands. The right drum was pretty scored so I went hunting for a replacement. No luck from the usual suppliers but I found one on eBay for $20 plus shipping that turned out to be OK. The drums don't have to be perfect because Ollie has been retired to parade duty.

    Another challenge in restoring old tractors is tools--most tractors requires a few unique tools that normally a dealer would have. If the manufacturer/dealer network is out of existence like MM and Oliver, you have to rely on eBay, craigslist, etc. or make the tool yourself. In the case of the Oliver 60's brakes, there's a tool to remove that big hex nut that holds the drum to the axle. Luckily, the head of a 3/4" hex bolt fits the socket in that nut nearly perfectly, so fired up the welder and made a tool. It's in the center of this photo. Put the transmission in low, chock the rear wheels, use the pipe cheater, some muscle and, presto, those two nuts are loose.

    -img_0487-small-jpg

  8. #28
    Veteran Member
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    Sep 2009
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    The County, ME
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    Kubota M5640SUD

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer View Post
    Hi: My only comment would be to avoid older tricycle front ends ie get wide fronts for slopes pr
    Thanks...I'm a little concerned about running into trouble around the pond area where there's a grade.

  9. #29
    Super Star Member
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    Mar 2009
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    16,150
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    Missouri
    Tractor
    Kubota, John Deere, Case, Massey Ferguson, Ford

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Quote Originally Posted by keegs View Post
    Thanks...I'm a little concerned about running into trouble around the pond area where there's a grade.
    There are a couple of good threads about operating on slopes. I am in the process of mowing on slopes and around ponds this week with our M8540 and no matter how many times I do, it is always a bit scary at times.
    Thread on helpful tractor abbreviations: http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/o...-acronyms.html

  10. #30
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    9,388
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    somewhere usa
    Tractor
    Deere 110tlb, 4520, x749, L130

    Default Re: How much repair do the old timers require?

    Interesting that tricyles fronts were brought up, I wouldn't mind having a good one for some uses, they turn on a dime.

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