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  1. #21
    Gold Member rmk700's Avatar
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    Mar 2011
    Posts
    437
    Location
    Utah
    Tractor
    Kubota L35

    Default Re: Heavy machinery operator

    Made my career as an heavy equipment operater. Going on 27 years now and still enjoy my job. You do need to like the outdoors and I'd take that over an office job any day. Now a days these big companies are using GPS on there equipment and having computer skills is essential. I mostly run a large trackhoe equipped with GPS.

  2. #22
    Bronze Member rubes2311's Avatar
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    Aug 2012
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    66
    Location
    Peterborough, Ontario
    Tractor
    Dynamark

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    I Love being outside and I live in Peterborough a city close to Toronto Ontario. Im looking for a career ill love and be happy with

  3. #23
    Bronze Member rubes2311's Avatar
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    Aug 2012
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    66
    Location
    Peterborough, Ontario
    Tractor
    Dynamark

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    [QUOTE="rubes2311"]I Love being outside and I live in Peterborough a town near toronto Ontario.

  4. #24
    Elite Member ovrszd's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    4,818
    Location
    Missouri
    Tractor
    Kubota M9540, JD2210

    Default Re: Heavy machinery operator

    Quote Originally Posted by rubes2311 View Post
    One thing i would like to do with my life is get a job I like and im happy doing. I know what your saying and i understand, im not thinking about becoming a heavy machinery op. because its cool its because its what I like doing
    Wow,,, you sure you're just 15??? Your post is wayyyyyy more mature than BobG's. Good thing for Bob that there are people like you that don't mind a hard day's work so he has a good road to drive on while looking down at the rest of us.
    Richard
    Kubota M9540, JD2210

  5. #25
    Bronze Member rubes2311's Avatar
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    Aug 2012
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    66
    Location
    Peterborough, Ontario
    Tractor
    Dynamark

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    Thank you very much and I love working. Ill work outside all day. I once had to remove a gravel path with a jd 755 i worked from 8 am to 11 pm, and I didnt want to stop!

  6. #26
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    1,895
    Location
    S. W. Virginia
    Tractor
    Kubota B3200, Ford NAA, IH 454D, Case 1845C

    Default Re: Heavy machinery operator

    If you are the entrepreneurial type (like to run your own business), you could get started in just a couple years with modest equipment, even the JD in your avatar would be a start. IF you really want to make good money in life doing work with 'heavy equipment' you need to own the company. Start small, be a good businessman, and don't use debt to build the company and you'll be well on your way to success.

    I started my first business when I was 17 using rented and family equipment, working after school/weekends/summers to build up the business, add equipment, etc. I got a Bachelors degree in Agricultural Economics, then got my contractors license and now build barns, fences, and do plenty of light grading/excavating. I have modest equipment but make a good living by finding the right niche. I enjoy running the big yellow iron and rent dozers, excavators, etc when my jobs call for it, but I don't really strive to be just a grading/excavating contractor. I've found the best money to be made with machines isn't by doing hourly work with them, but instead using them to complete a project you bid on. (although hourly work is a good start)

    Also, one of my cousins started a landscaping company when he was 15 or 16. It took off and he was owning trucks and equipment before he even had his license. Had employees that drove the trucks and helped with the work. It's all about working hard, being smart with your money, and being honest and personable.

    With all that said, if you are not the business owner type that's ok (in fact there are a lot of people that own businesses that shouldn't). I also know people that are quite content just running the equipment and getting paid for it. For some it's just a side job because they like to do it, for others it's their full-time living. Regardless, you can't go wrong by doing well in school, getting a good degree in business or whatever and pick up the skills/trade licenses on the side along the way.
    Kubota B3200
    Ford NAA Jubilee
    International 454D
    Case 1845C skid steer
    JD 265

  7. #27
    Veteran Member bigtiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,930
    Location
    central Iowa
    Tractor
    JD 2720

    Default Re: Heavy machinery operator

    Quote Originally Posted by ovrszd View Post
    Wow,,, you sure you're just 15??? Your post is wayyyyyy more mature than BobG's. Good thing for Bob that there are people like you that don't mind a hard day's work so he has a good road to drive on while looking down at the rest of us.
    Why are you slamming BobG's contribution to the conversation? The voice of experience is always a good one to listen to.
    HAVE FUN

    Life is easier when you plow around the stumps.


    2720

  8. #28
    Veteran Member RDrancher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    1,762
    Location
    Sanger, Texas
    Tractor
    New Holland TC35D, Case TR320 CTL

    Default Re: Heavy machinery operator

    Quote Originally Posted by Verticaltrx View Post
    If you are the entrepreneurial type (like to run your own business), you could get started in just a couple years with modest equipment, even the JD in your avatar would be a start. IF you really want to make good money in life doing work with 'heavy equipment' you need to own the company. Start small, be a good businessman, and don't use debt to build the company and you'll be well on your way to success.

    I started my first business when I was 17 using rented and family equipment, working after school/weekends/summers to build up the business, add equipment, etc. I got a Bachelors degree in Agricultural Economics, then got my contractors license and now build barns, fences, and do plenty of light grading/excavating. I have modest equipment but make a good living by finding the right niche. I enjoy running the big yellow iron and rent dozers, excavators, etc when my jobs call for it, but I don't really strive to be just a grading/excavating contractor. I've found the best money to be made with machines isn't by doing hourly work with them, but instead using them to complete a project you bid on. (although hourly work is a good start)

    Also, one of my cousins started a landscaping company when he was 15 or 16. It took off and he was owning trucks and equipment before he even had his license. Had employees that drove the trucks and helped with the work. It's all about working hard, being smart with your money, and being honest and personable.

    With all that said, if you are not the business owner type that's ok (in fact there are a lot of people that own businesses that shouldn't). I also know people that are quite content just running the equipment and getting paid for it. For some it's just a side job because they like to do it, for others it's their full-time living. Regardless, you can't go wrong by doing well in school, getting a good degree in business or whatever and pick up the skills/trade licenses on the side along the way.
    I'm in perfect agreement with all of the above.

    If I would have followed my dreams back back in the '70's when I was working my first real job for an excavation company, I would be way ahead of where I am today. That's not saying that where I'm at isn't a pretty good darn place! Back in the days before skid steers I wanted to own and operate a track loader and dozer. I got sidetracked and ended up being a concrete contractor for a bunch of years. (That's a whole 'nother story.) After all of those years of worrying about taking care of a bunch of employees I decided to go it alone. I've now found a niche and work mainly by myself with one tractor and rental equipment when I need it. It's a very good living without all of the worries and I wouldn't have it any other way. BTW - I never do hourly work...period.

    As far as being a heavy equipment operator as an employee, my brother-in-law works for a small non-union excavation company (80 employees) in SoCal and has made a very good living at it by paying attention, always being available and being very reliable. He's what they call a "valuable employee" and if that's the route you choose then that's what you want to strive to be.

    I will also add that I've never been around an "excellent" operator that didn't also know how to run a shovel like a pro. It's okay to start at the bottom and learn the ropes.
    John

    My Work & Stuff Photo Thread: http://www.tractorbynet.com/forums/p...to-thread.html

    Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.

  9. #29
    Bronze Member rubes2311's Avatar
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    Aug 2012
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    66
    Location
    Peterborough, Ontario
    Tractor
    Dynamark

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    I was hoping to work in road construction or for a contractor and getting some contacts and then when i have a small work crew of a few people I would start a landscaping company hoping i could get cheat material from a few of my contacts

  10. #30
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    1,696
    Location
    Central VA, USA
    Tractor
    Mahindra 6000 MWFD, 2 1950's Farmalls, 1974 Farmall 140, 1967 Mf 135Delux

    Default Re: Heavy machinery operator

    Quote Originally Posted by ovrszd View Post
    Wow,,, you sure you're just 15??? Your post is wayyyyyy more mature than BobG's. Good thing for Bob that there are people like you that don't mind a hard day's work so he has a good road to drive on while looking down at the rest of us.
    Cute! Funny you should mention roads to drive on....since it was Interstate 64 thru Virgina that I worked on when I was and operator..by the way...have YOU ever been one? BobG in VA who was "operating" machinery on the family farm by the time he was 9....still do that sort of stuff after I gave the Dep of Defense (ours by the way) 34 years of his life...so pls don't speak to me or anyone else about maturity until you walk a mile in someone else's shoes. BobG in VA

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