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  1. #1
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    Default Next Question from way up North K, JD, NH

    I appreciate your answers to my last call for education.

    I think I have things narrowed down (as of right now...) to the following choices:

    kubota L4240 have a dealer in Fairbanks
    John Deere 4120, have a dealer in Fairbanks
    New Holland Boomer 3045 dealer in Anchorage (almost 400 miles away).

    All have cabs, all are 4WD, very close in things like HP, lifting capacities with the FEL and 3PH. The NH has a continuously variable transmission rather than an HST / HST +.

    I've not yet driven all of them. I did drive a Kubota L3940 here in town. I'm thinking I'll call the three dealers down in Anchorage, and if they have an expample of each type (or close), I'll make a trip down to the big city to drive each of them.

    Before then, I'd like to hear any prefferences out there on these machines..and why. What to look out for. Is one engine/ transmisison / hydraulics, etc known to have a particualr problem? Is getting parts from any of the companies likely to be a problem in a couple of years? Any input / advise is appreciated.

    Hope the big snow storm down there wasn't too hard on any of you.

    Thank you,

    John

  2. #2
    Super Member mjncad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Next Question from way up North K, JD, NH

    John:

    You're making a big purchase, so by all reasonable means test drive them all if you can. I prefer the JD 2-pedal HST system to the kubota treadle method of controlling direction on a HST trans. For me the treadle is a deal breaker; but that's just me.

    Deere's parts system www.jdparts.com is the same one the dealers use. So you can view and order parts from the comfort of your home. To save on shipping costs and delays I pick up my parts at the dealer; but you can arrange for the parts to be shipped to your house if need be. I use JDparts almost exclusively and just wait for the parts department to call and tell me that my stuff is in. I assume Kubota has a similar system; but I don't know for certain.

    I have no experience with New Holland; but I don't see many around here. Unless someone knows more about the mechanical guts of all three companies transmissions than I do; I'm going to go out on a limb and say the NH CVT is the same as a HST as HST's have an infinite speed range within their high and low speed bands.

    Getting parts and service for Deere and Kubota should be a snap. Going 400-miles one way to get service is a deal breaker for any brand for me when there are two other top tier brands in your hometown.
    Paraphrasing Douglas Adams - So long and thanks for all the bacon.

  3. #3
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    Default

    As far as I am aware you cannot get a cab on a 4120. I believe you have to step up to a 4320 for a cab from JD.

  4. #4
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    Kubota L4610 & BX2230, Farmall Super M, Super A

    Default Re: Next Question from way up North K, JD, NH

    Quote Originally Posted by mjncad View Post
    John:

    You're making a big purchase, so by all reasonable means test drive them all if you can. I prefer the JD 2-pedal HST system to the kubota treadle method of controlling direction on a HST trans. For me the treadle is a deal breaker; but that's just me.

    Deere's parts system www.jdparts.com is the same one the dealers use. So you can view and order parts from the comfort of your home. To save on shipping costs and delays I pick up my parts at the dealer; but you can arrange for the parts to be shipped to your house if need be. I use JDparts almost exclusively and just wait for the parts department to call and tell me that my stuff is in. I assume Kubota has a similar system; but I don't know for certain.

    I have no experience with New Holland; but I don't see many around here. Unless someone knows more about the mechanical guts of all three companies transmissions than I do; I'm going to go out on a limb and say the NH CVT is the same as a HST as HST's have an infinite speed range within their high and low speed bands.

    Getting parts and service for Deere and Kubota should be a snap. Going 400-miles one way to get service is a deal breaker for any brand for me when there are two other top tier brands in your hometown.
    I'll agree with the sentiment here, even if some of my own preferences might differ a bit based on the brand. I'm a one-treadle guy, for example, but that's something everyone should decide for themselves. The preference thing extends to the tractors themselves. They are all very good units that would no doubt do your work equally well. You should decide for yourself which one you prefer.

    The New Holland CVT is a different technology from HST. It's widely used in larger ag equipment and NH has adapted it to these smaller tractors. Without having used it myself, it seems like a promising innovation to me because it gives the infinite speed control of a hydro without the loss in mechanical efficiency. Maybe an NH owner can say more based on actual experience using it.

    The Deere and Kubota tractors both have advanced HST systems offering load sensing and responsiveness adjustments. The Kubota HST is a newer design and somewhat more sophisticated with automatic on the go range shifting and automatic throttle advance features. The owners of both systems say they appreciate their capabilities.

    Availability of parts is indeed something to consider, particularly if you're some distance out in the sticks. The JD parts system is legendary, but I've had no problems getting Kubota parts at my doorstep quickly for my 2002 tractor... virtually all of which, incidentally, were either maintenance items or stuff I managed to damage in some boneheaded manner.

    These tractors arrive at a dealers knocked-down for shipping and the dealer does the final assembly. Much of the quality of the delivered product depends on the dealer doing a careful, complete final setup, along with giving the completed machine a thorough test run. There can be loose bolts and fittings, leaks, mal-adjusted controls, you name it, if that final prep is done poorly. So, no matter which brand you choose, find a good dealer, insist that your unit is carefully set-up and and tested, and give it a good shake-down run yourself at the time of delivery.

    Good luck with your shopping.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Next Question from way up North K, JD, NH

    Quote Originally Posted by Grandad4 View Post
    I'll agree with the sentiment here, even if some of my own preferences might differ a bit based on the brand. I'm a one-treadle guy, for example, but that's something everyone should decide for themselves. The preference thing extends to the tractors themselves. They are all very good units that would no doubt do your work equally well. You should decide for yourself which one you prefer.

    The New Holland CVT is a different technology from HST. It's widely used in larger ag equipment and NH has adapted it to these smaller tractors. Without having used it myself, it seems like a promising innovation to me because it gives the infinite speed control of a hydro without the loss in mechanical efficiency. Maybe an NH owner can say more based on actual experience using it.

    The Deere and kubota tractors both have advanced HST systems offering load sensing and responsiveness adjustments. The Kubota HST is a newer design and somewhat more sophisticated with automatic on the go range shifting and automatic throttle advance features. The owners of both systems say they appreciate their capabilities.

    Availability of parts is indeed something to consider, particularly if you're some distance out in the sticks. The JD parts system is legendary, but I've had no problems getting Kubota parts at my doorstep quickly for my 2002 tractor... virtually all of which, incidentally, were either maintenance items or stuff I managed to damage in some boneheaded manner.

    These tractors arrive at a dealers knocked-down for shipping and the dealer does the final assembly. Much of the quality of the delivered product depends on the dealer doing a careful, complete final setup, along with giving the completed machine a thorough test run. There can be loose bolts and fittings, leaks, mal-adjusted controls, you name it, if that final prep is done poorly. So, no matter which brand you choose, find a good dealer, insist that your unit is carefully set-up and and tested, and give it a good shake-down run yourself at the time of delivery.

    Good luck with your shopping.
    Very good advice .

  6. #6
    Super Member mjncad's Avatar
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    Default Re: Next Question from way up North K, JD, NH

    +1...
    Paraphrasing Douglas Adams - So long and thanks for all the bacon.

  7. #7
    Elite Member AKfish's Avatar
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    Default Re: Next Question from way up North K, JD, NH

    I just noticed this last post, John. I did respond to your initial questions, though. IMO, you're looking at machines that are alot more tractor than you'd need for a 4-acre homesite. And considerably more money versus a 3000 series machine.

    The Soldotna dealership (Craig Taylor) does not have ANY cab tractors on the lot. As a matter of fact, I have never seen a cab JD on their lot that wasn't ordered by a customer - not in the 30+ years that I've lived here!

    This past fall/early winter they had several 1000, 3000 and 4000 machines. Although, no 40x20 series on the lot. A couple of 5000e machines (5065e), too.

    Unfortunately, I've never been able to work an acceptable deal with either Craig Taylor or kubota in the past. Maybe you'll have better luck - hopefully.

    Send me a PM if you'd like. I'd be happy to answer any questions.

    AKfish
    "Most people want to live on top of the mountain, but all the happiness and growth occurs while you're climbing it."

  8. #8
    Super Member crazyal's Avatar
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    Default Re: Next Question from way up North K, JD, NH

    I've got a 4240 and it's a great machine, it's not a cab though. I have no regrets nor have I seen any other brand that I would rather have. The NH CVT would be nice to try but the HST works fine. kubota's HST+ transmission is what has sold me on the Grand L. It's kind of hard to learn just how much it will increase your productivity with just a few minute test drive. If you have questions about it just start a thread in the Kubota section and you'll get all the information you cold ever want. Plus Messicks in NY has some videos on how it works that are really worth watching.
    Kubota L4240,Case 580K backhoe, Case 450 Dozer

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