Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 111
  1. #21
    Super Member crazyal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,924
    Location
    Northern Vermont

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    Here's what I'll do, after I complete a couple other large projects around the house. These guys have lots of options for backup generators with name brand engines, not the Chinese stuff that you may never find parts to repair. They have a 10K kubota I really like.

    Central Maine Diesel Generators | Diesel Generators | Triple-Fuel Generators | Propane/Natural Gas Generators
    Kubota L4240,Case 580K backhoe, Case 450 Dozer

  2. #22
    Super Member Scooby074's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6,087
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Tractor
    BX 25, ZD 326

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    If you arent going to try and run a computer (some do, I probably wouldnt) a big ole' Listeroid diesel powered genny would be the ticket. 6000-7500w . Run forever on questionable fuel. Big hunk of iron that you can fix with a hammer etc.etc. Plus theyre pretty cool in their own right. If the world ends, cockroaches and listers might be all thats left Plus just listen to it! How can you not love a ticking diesel!

  3. #23
    Silver Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    135
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Tractor
    JD 5055, Mahindra 315, JD 2040

    Default

    10kw? 20kw?
    I just don't get it.....
    Have been through 3 6 day power outages in the past 10 years.

    Honda 2000 and love it. Sips fuel which can be very difficult to come by. No problems. Quite comfortable.

    If I had a well a slightly different story, probably something just big enough to handle the well.

    I suggest you rethink exactly you really need.

  4. #24
    Elite Member GManBart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    3,005
    Location
    Belleville, MI
    Tractor
    Massey Ferguson 241, Massey Ferguson 2244 crawler, Case 580 Super M Series 2

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    Quote Originally Posted by dave1949 View Post
    How much of the 20KW are you actually using? Peak? Average? Unless you know, then it doesn't matter how big the generator is.

    The OP lives in a rural setting in NY. Chances are, he will survive without AC. I'm sure AC is nice to have in your location, but unless you have a compelling medical condition, you would also survive.

    My 6500W generator will run my house. Well pump, water heater, lights, microwave, refrigerator and small chest freezer. I cook with propane, heat with wood and sunshine, and it would be a long outage before I would really miss using the washer and dryer. With some manual power management, the dryer could be used. It wouldn't surprise me if the generator breaker tripped if the well, water heater and refrigerator all ran together. That would not be hard to manage either.

    No point in overspending for generator capacity that will never be used.
    Sigh, why is it when someone here posts something like "I've done the math, and I need 10KW", some expert has to tell them "oh no, I get by with 7KW, so you should be able to as well"?

    The OP said he's estimated that he needs 10KW....let it go.

    I had two electricians do a survey of my house, and they both said an absolute minimum of 17KW to run most things, including the AC, but that would still require being careful. I ran the numbers myself (I'm pretty familiar with Ohm's law), and cross-checked that on Generac's site, and other sites that have calculators for figuring how much you need. The low end was 17KW, and the high end was 22KW, as I recall. The difference between a 17KW and 20KW unit was around $300, so it would have been stupid to go with the smaller unit. I would have gone with 22KW, but they don't make an air-cooled model that large, and the liquid cooled units get big, and expensive.

    Survive an outage in high temps? Probably, but as usual, the folks making comments like this don't know the facts that they're commenting on. My wife primarily works from home (this week she's in DC), in a loft office that would have been simply unbearable if the AC wasn't available the last time we had an outage (24hrs). She's a senior VP at an international company, and is paid accordingly, so she can't just say "oops, our power is out". She absolutely has to be able to work normally regardless of power outages....cell phone backup, mobile 4G hotspot, etc, etc are all in place so she can stay connected. Her company made a major concession keeping her as a remote employee, so we have to do our part. In addition, I sometimes have to travel for work, and am literally on-call 24/7/365. If things go really bad, I may not be home for several days, or longer. The closest gas station is 20min away, and I wouldn't have my 105lb wife trying to drag a generator out, and deal with trying to keep the tank full, and gas cans topped off, on top of working all day....it's simply not worth it.

    We've had outages as long as four days here in the last few years, and several hours, to a day, is pretty common....we're in the sticks, and the last to get things fixed. I'm much happier having a unit that isn't taxed 100% to just barely keep things going. In fact, during the last outage, it was very hot (as I mentioned), and there were times when the AC would kick on, and it was obvious that the fan was spooling up slower than usual....short version, we were using all the generator had to give, and we were being careful about what we were using.

    There's no point in spending a bunch of money on a generator if it still won't do everything you want it to do, and a little extra capacity won't hurt anything. It's like buying a 40gal hot water heater when you really need a 50gal unit, and wind up taking cold showers....dumb, and false economy.

  5. #25
    Super Member crazyal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,924
    Location
    Northern Vermont

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    For each person the minimum load will be different. I'm making due with a 5kw generator but it's the bare minimum to run my well pump. To do it I have to shut off everything else. 10k will not drive everything in a house but it would be fine for me. AC is not an issue and I can make do without the electric oven. Heating is done with a wood stove. But the freezer and fridge need to be ran for a little while every couple of hours as well as the furnace to keep the hot water at temp. That works out to 7kw to 8kw. A 10kw would give me a little extra room.

    A pto generator is OK but I can easily teach my GF how to start a stand by generator. Trying to teach her how to start the tractor, engage the pto, and set the RPM to get the correct voltage is asking too much. The same holds true for refueling. A stand by with a large tank that I also use to fill the tractor wouldn't need refueling.
    Kubota L4240,Case 580K backhoe, Case 450 Dozer

  6. #26
    Elite Member newbury's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    4,894
    Location
    From Vt, in Va, retiring to MS
    Tractor
    Kubota's - B7610, M4700

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby074 View Post
    Some people want to just flick a switch and live like there is no outage.
    And a LOT of people would object to even flipping the switch. They want POWER 24/7 seamlessly.

    After Hurricane Isabel (2003) my former boss had a $10,000 generator package installed that kicked in whenever the power went off. The only "urgent" condition that required 24/7 power was that his stereo didn't get interrupted. I bought my $600 Honda powered generator.

    Since then - almost 10 years - other than a few "short outages" where power wasn't off for more than an hour or so and thus wasn't an emergency - we've had 1 power outage that I ran my genset intermittently for about an hour.

    He's happy, I'm happy.

    If the OP thinks he needs 10KW and diesel let's give him advice for that.

    If you read the other threads gasoline is often difficult to get in an extended power outage ( think Hurricane Sandy).

    Diesel makes great sense if you have the infrastructure.

    OP
    Do you need it "quiet" or can you work with an open genset and build an enclosure?
    Can you wrench and take care of a used unit or do you need new?

    I also would strongly suggest a used military genset.
    My rides - '95 Kubota M4700 w/ PEC, LA1001 FEL :'07 B7610, LA352 FEL, Bush Hog SBX 48 box blade, '09 Woods BH70-X w/ 16" bucket and thumb, 3pt pallet forks, Dale Phillips PHD, Jinma 8" chipper, 2 Piranha's, Winco 12KW PTO generator, Howse plow, 5' KK tiller, 5' Big Bee cutter, with a 2002 7.3L Ford F350 CC DRW 4x4 and '07 18' Hudson HSE Deluxe trailer - 5 Ton to haul it all

  7. #27
    Super Star Member dave1949's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    10,830
    Location
    Industry, Maine
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    GManBart

    Go back and read posts #1 and #2. OP "rough calculations." Me "how sure are you?"
    Post #16 Me, "I'm not trying to tell the OP what size gen. he needs. His estimate was 10KW as I understood it. Could be right, or not."

    So far, everyone BUT the OP has offered up their personal experiences. You, not knowing anymore than anyone else about the OP's real needs, are defending a large capacity generator--because you have one I guess, but don't know how much it actually produces apparently.

    Anecdotal info about "spooling up slowly" is not how generator output is measured. Although I've never seen medical research that correlates one's pay grade to their core body temperature, and I want your wife to be comfortable by all means, that is not what is being talked about regarding actual generator output either.

    An electrician is not going to put themselves in a position of a customer calling them and complaining about not enough power, just like furnace & heating guys, they will always err on the side of abundance rather than get calls that a house is cold. If they are installing a particular brand/model, from past experience they will recommend a unit rating that has worked in the past for the estimated load. Unit rating is not actual performance.
    "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end ..."
    When there is a huge solar energy spill, it is called a "nice day"!

  8. #28
    Super Member Scooby074's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    6,087
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Tractor
    BX 25, ZD 326

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    Quote Originally Posted by dave1949 View Post
    GManBart


    An electrician is not going to put themselves in a position of a customer calling them and complaining about not enough power, just like furnace & heating guys, they will always err on the side of abundance rather than get calls that a house is cold. If they are installing a particular brand/model, from past experience they will recommend a unit rating that has worked in the past for the estimated load. Unit rating is not actual performance.
    This is it in a nutshell nobody wants a callback. Code requires you to size a genset a certain way, and those calculations lead to a HUGELY oversized generator compared to if you do your load balancing manually and start motors one at a time etc.

  9. #29
    Super Star Member dave1949's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    10,830
    Location
    Industry, Maine
    Tractor
    New Holland TC40

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    Quote Originally Posted by Scooby074 View Post
    This is it in a nutshell nobody wants a callback. Code requires you to size a genset a certain way, and those calculations lead to a HUGELY oversized generator compared to if you do your load balancing manually and start motors one at a time etc.
    Ease of use, for a given person's situation, is certainly important, but logically I think nailing down the actual power need should come first, then look for a unit/installation/set-up that provides that in a way that works for the situation. It's really two different selection parameters.

    It could well be that to get the desired ease of use, a person ends up with a larger capacity unit than needed electrically because that is what the market offers. The difference needs to be understood though.
    "Those were the days my friend, we thought they'd never end ..."
    When there is a huge solar energy spill, it is called a "nice day"!

  10. #30
    Elite Member GManBart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    3,005
    Location
    Belleville, MI
    Tractor
    Massey Ferguson 241, Massey Ferguson 2244 crawler, Case 580 Super M Series 2

    Default Re: Diesel generator for home back up use

    Quote Originally Posted by dave1949 View Post
    GManBart

    Go back and read posts #1 and #2. OP "rough calculations." Me "how sure are you?"
    Post #16 Me, "I'm not trying to tell the OP what size gen. he needs. His estimate was 10KW as I understood it. Could be right, or not."

    So far, everyone BUT the OP has offered up their personal experiences. You, not knowing anymore than anyone else about the OP's real needs, are defending a large capacity generator--because you have one I guess, but don't know how much it actually produces apparently.

    Anecdotal info about "spooling up slowly" is not how generator output is measured. Although I've never seen medical research that correlates one's pay grade to their core body temperature, and I want your wife to be comfortable by all means, that is not what is being talked about regarding actual generator output either.

    An electrician is not going to put themselves in a position of a customer calling them and complaining about not enough power, just like furnace & heating guys, they will always err on the side of abundance rather than get calls that a house is cold. If they are installing a particular brand/model, from past experience they will recommend a unit rating that has worked in the past for the estimated load. Unit rating is not actual performance.
    My point wasn't defending larger generators, it was simply saying that 10KW isn't necessarily "big". My neighbor's house is a fair amount smaller than mine, and he's running either a 14KW or 17KW unit (can't recall)....many other people in the area are as well. There's a reason dedicated standby generators start around 8KW, and go way bigger than that...8KW just isn't that big.

    I ran the numbers on our house prior to the install, and came up with the same ballpark two electricians did, and a couple of online calculators...I didn't keep any of that data, so I can't quote a figure, but 20KW wasn't even close to being an over abundance, it was slightly more than a max running load (generator is spec'd at 75amps continuous).

    I never said we couldn't survive without AC, just that my wife wouldn't be able to work effectively, which is a non-starter. Right before we moved in, the power was out for four days while we were doing a remodel, and if we had been living here, we would have found a hotel to stay in...it was brutal.

    If the OP thinks he needs 10KW, it's really not going to save him a bunch of money dropping down to 7/8KW, but it might cause him to lose things he'd like to keep running during an outage.

Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 22
    Last Post: 03-10-2013, 07:26 PM
  2. Back up generator ideas
    By grainger12002 in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-02-2013, 01:18 AM
  3. Generator feed back
    By Trainer in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 12-28-2008, 04:36 PM
  4. home back-up generator help
    By ccatfish in forum Rural Living
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-31-2000, 11:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
© 2014 TractorByNet.com. TractorByNet is a registered trademark of IMC Digital Universe, Inc. Other trademarks on this page are the property of their respective owners.