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  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    8
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Tractor
    JD 4510

    Default Pucker Factor Rating?

    I have been lurking the net for months now, looking for recommendations and advice on tractors and have found this site to be awesome. Thanks to the administrators and folks who work behind the seen providing this service, as well as, those who take the time to answer the questions.

    Pucker Factor Rating?

    I have been trying to decide on exactly what type of tractor to buy in order to bush hog my property, safely. Being new at this, I am proceeding with caution. I have read many of the threads but still worry about the ďpuckerĒ factor. After viewing the attached picture, on a scale of 1 to 10 (with 10 being the worst case) how steep would you rate these hills and/or what tractor would you feel the safest in driving up & down this slope? I donít know the actual slope angle but can say Iíve been stuck twice climbing the closest hill with a 2WD ATV.

    I am thinking of going with the kubota L3430 or the L3830, HST, AG tires weighted and extended. Two local dealers are extremely helpful with one even offering to bring the tractors to the farm to see how well they do on the hills. Some who have seen the farm say these hills are nothing, but to me they seem pretty steep. Guess some seat time will tell.

    Thanks in advance,
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Super Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    6,312
    Location
    central New York
    Tractor
    all makes and models

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    I think the larger one has a wider stance for more stability and you would be easily able to go to a 72" bush hog. Some one has been mowing it and going across which is harder to hold on hills then going up and down.

  3. #3
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    589
    Location
    Illinois
    Tractor
    Ventrac 4500

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    Ron,

    You can take some of the guesswork out of this with a quick trip to the hardware store to purchase a $5 contractors protractor level. When measuring your slopes, use a piece of plywood, say a foot square, as a base for the level. After you have determined the steepest slopes and approximately where they are located you will be able to make some rational decisions about the tractor.

    Most compacts with attached loaders or mowers and with the wheels set as wide as practical can handle general slopes of up to 15 degrees sideways when operated in 4WD. They can usually do a little more in 4WD going straight up or down.

    Go for the widest stance tractor that is practical for you.

    The field in the photo you show has obviously been mowed with some kind of tractor and mower. Maybe it was a full-sized agricultural tractor with the wheels set quite wide.

    Let us know what kind of slopes you measure if you choose to take the recommendation.

    JackIL

  4. #4
    Super Member JerryG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    7,212
    Location
    Northwest Arkansas
    Tractor
    MF 1440-4 PowerShuttle

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    Ron,
    I am pretty comfortable going across 15 degree slopes, I do mow up to about 20 degrees. As far as going up and down, I do a lot of 30 degree slopes. Anything over those amounts my pucker is working pretty hard. I might add for safety, the angle of a tractor can change real fast if you hit a rock, stump, log and drop in to a hole. The areas that I am referring to, I have mowed dozens of times and know for sure what is there.

  5. #5
    Veteran Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    1,070
    Location
    Western Washington
    Tractor
    5300 JD 4X4

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    I do what most would call extreme mowing on the pipeline. Up and down hills that you can hardly walk on. the thing is, do not get sideways and have your tractor spread as side as it will go. Keep all attachments as low as you can, especially loaders. When mowing downhill be sure to have 4 wheel ingaged. If you don't have 4wd donot attempt to nose over a hill, you will have no brakes as the weight of the tractor will be on the frontend and it will get away from you. I generally mow downhill as sometimes the sticker bushes are well over 12 ft high and I am blind going down through them. I just take it easy, and feel my way down, backing out is not usually a problem as the bucket will push me back when I need a little help. I have a belly pan under the entire lingth of the tractor to protect plumbing and linkages and a winch in the loader, just in case. I am using a 5300 Jd at this time with a bush hog 6ft. I would recommend that what ever mower you buy that you reinforce the shroud if you have any tough going. Have fun

  6. #6
    Platinum Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    992
    Location
    Salem, CT
    Tractor
    Deere 4310

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    If I see the angle correctly in the picture I would give that a P factor of 8.5 - Looks like a good hill to sled on though. [img]/forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Elite Member SPIKER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    4,841
    Location
    Ohio, Jeromesville, Ashland County
    Tractor
    Jinma 284

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    Looks like the little pond will break any falls you might have! but ya good pucker factor !

    Mark M [img]/forums/images/graemlins/ooo.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Epic Contributor MossRoad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    25,906
    Location
    South Bend, Indiana (near)
    Tractor
    Power Trac PT425 2001 Model Year

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    Welcome to TBN! [img]/forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

    I agree with JackIL... determine exactly what the slope is.

    Just for fun...

    Check out these slope mowers from Power Trac. Be sure to scroll down to see the rest and click on the attachment links. Fun reading.

  9. #9
    Super Member _RaT_'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Posts
    5,814
    Location
    Northern CA.
    Tractor
    Push mower, Snapper 21" 6 shovels, 2 rakes, a pick, 2 pinch bars, a post hole digger (two handle type) and 2 wheel barrows that handle like a Porsche.

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    Ron, I have hills all around my place and use a L3830HST. I mow in all directions but must be extra cautious on only one (besides around the pond). The tractor actually slips down the hill most of the time. I am always ready to turn the wheel in the event the tractor gets to light on the uphill side and have never had any of the wheels leave the ground. My older International 454 saddle tractor feels incredibly secure yet even it slides down the hill depending on grass conditions. I do not have my L3830 ballasted in the tires and don't feel the need. I should measure the slope on my hill to give you an accurate rating of what it is I'm working on, perhaps a picture tommorrow with my new digital camera is in order.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    8
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Tractor
    JD 4510

    Default Re: Pucker Factor Rating?

    Iíve taken JackILís advice and took some measurements this morning and found the slopes to be an average of 20 degrees on both sides of the pond. (The temperature was 9 degrees with the wind chill factor so I didnít stay very long.) The steepest I was able to measure was on the far side of the dam, close to the pond, which measured 30 degrees.

    While walking the hills I noticed where some erosion had occurred where we ran some ATVís over the summer. Including the ruts would quickly worsen my measurements as JerryG had warned. (See newly attached photo).

    MossRoad - I have requested info from Power Trac and that might be my best option. I like the low center of gravity and width.

    I guess I am looking for some reassurance that these hills can indeed be safely cut with a Compact Utility Tractor. It sounds as if the CUT tractor may be borderline. Maybe a larger utility tractor is needed or a special like the Power Trac is the way to go. Iím still undecided since I donít want to wind up upside down in the pond.

    Thanks,
    Attached Images Attached Images

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